Interview with a LEGO Certified Professional

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Ever wondered what a LEGO Certified Professional (LCP) does, how you become one and how to engage their services?

A few weeks ago I met up with the UK's only LCP, Duncan Titmarsh of Bright Bricks, at his workshop in Surrey to find out. Read my exclusive interview for the answers to these questions.

Once you've done so, check out Bright Bricks' website where'll you'll find more photos of Duncan's excellent work and details of how to get in touch to commission your own masterpiece.

17 comments on this article

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By in United States,

Man, that's got to be the coolest job ever! I'd love to work building these things for companies, etc!

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By in United Kingdom,

Good interview Huw, it's a great idea to publish stuff like this, especially in slow news weeks!

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By in United Kingdom,

WOW, I'd love to be a LCP! Being paid to build LEGO, what could be better? It's interesting that there are only 13 across the world, I imagined there being more.
Anyway, thanks for this Huw, it was very interesting.

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By in United States,

i am sooooo jealous of his organisational set-up!!

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By in United States,

His Empire State Building is more what I have in mind than the teeny Architecture one (well, maybe not five feet tall, but still). What a great job and a great imagination. Thank you for the interview!

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By in United States,

This guy is cool.

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By in United States,

I wonder where Duncan got his lego storage. I'm super jealous!

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By in United States,

I have a few of those wooden drawer units, they are nice. Sturdy and simple. I got them at Ikea, but I don't see them on the website.

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By in Australia,

The LEGO community simply never ceases to amaze me.

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By in United Kingdom,

Wow it must be awesome being a certified Lego expert!

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By in Netherlands,

Fun read. Although it's probably hard work like any other job, it's certainly still a dream job for most of us :)

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By in United States,

Yeah, those are wooden IKEA drawer sets called FIRA. Not available at my local IKEA at the moment, but they frequently have that type of small drawer unit available. I would find them in the IKEA department that sold small storage items, wastebaskets, clocks, tools etc. Right before the lightbulb & lamp department. As I recall, they cost somewhere between $10 and $15 per unit, which gave you 8 drawers -- one large, two medium, and three small. He obviously mixed them up to put the different groups of drawers in the best arrangement for his bricks. And it's quite thin wood, which means you can fasten the grey anchor plate onto the drawer with nuts and bolts, then change the labeling item as your needs change by clutching it onto that anchor plate with LEGO clutch power. How brilliant!

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By in United States,

while that is cool, i wouldn't want a job like that. maybe its because i'm nont that obbsessed with lego, or because you might not make as much money than if you were working an office job.
still cool though.

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By in United Kingdom,

The draws were from IKEA, Duncan got them as a job lot. The bits of plate on the front are glued on and Duncan's got a great lettering code to identify where additional stock of any part is stored using the LEGO 1x1 letter tiles. That is because, frighteningly, what you see in the draws is less than half his stock! Of course it has now increased significantly now it also contains all my LEGO.

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By in Taiwan,

Thanks for that interview. It was interesting to learn more about the behind-the-scenes for a Lego topic that has always seemed interesting and a bit under-explained.

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By in Croatia,

According to the MOCpages titles, Matija Pužar is also and LCP, and he lives in Norway.
Explanation?

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