Mr. Gold on eBay

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Two Mr. Golds have been offered for sale on eBay by the same seller in Germany:
Lot 1 | Lot 2. The asking price is €999, which is about $1300.

This proves why it was a misguided decision on the part of LEGO to produce the figure in such limited numbers and distribute them as they are doing. All it will do is enable third-party sellers to profit massively should they find one whilst at the same time annoying loyal customers and minifig collectors.

In other series 10 news, I'm told that they can be ordered from shop.LEGO.com in Switzerland and that the official release date in the USA, when they'll be available in Target, is May 1.

(Thanks Luke, lifelislegos and Ben for the news).

175 comments on this article

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By in United Kingdom,

This is why all theese limited number promotions simply don't work! They rarely go to the people who appreciate them the only seem to go to financially enriching some ebay seller who couldn't care less about the figures and only cares about profit. I understand it is supposed to an exciting challenge but "super rares" just don't work because no lego fans find any. Its exactly the same thing with the doctor who character building pack super rares. There is no point,if lego and character to an extent want the fans to find theese figures they should just release them universally rather than relying on blind bags. In fact they should have the character in the bag printed on the front! More often than not you don't get the one you want so it may be fun all this mystery for some people but it would be better if you knew what you were buying. There i said it.

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By in United Kingdom,

Does it not seem a bit odd that 2 Mr Gold's are with the same seller, so soon? My first instinct was that these may be fakes, but it's probably not the case, particularly as the seller has such good feedback.

Anyway... I have never despised a few pieces of LEGO before, but everything about this minifigure and the way it's sold by LEGO is truly hideous. Even if someone handed me one tomorrow and said "just take it", I wouldn't (unless I was going to sell it on ebay and give the money to charity, perhaps).

I felt a bit sick about the whole thing when the news of the figure was released, but today, with the above news, it feels like a dark day for this LEGO fan, indeed. :(

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By in United Kingdom,

The odds on a collector pulling two of these are almost zero. I wonder how the seller came by 2?

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By in Australia,

Yeah, I don't know about this either. I'm not gonna be bothered trying to find Mr Gold. If I find him through sheer luck, great, otherwise I'm throwing a lot of money away to someone on eBay.

These minifigs test my patience enough (with the blind-lucky-dip element to collecting them). Anything beyond that, and no Lego, I don't think so.

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By in United Kingdom,

They should have placed a small note in a standard CMF with a code to send off and claim the exclusive figure. This way no one can feel for it and then everyone has the same chance of winning one. These bags will be felt to death probably before put out for sale so a little child has no chance of pulling one out of the box.

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By in New Zealand,

There are other super rare minifigures, such as a the comic con or toy fair super heroes. But at least LEGO gave them away for free. They are also on sale at BL for nearly 1000 USD. This has nothing to do with collecting. This is only about money. I am disappointed.

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By in Belgium,

I'm also wondering why one person can find two? Perhaps he already has more by now. I'm just gonna buy one sealed box and hope there's one in there.

Who's going to pay €1000 for a minifig?

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By in United Kingdom,

I'd rather have the gold C-3P0 from way back.

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By in United States,

Like I've said before: I am not a fan of marketing schemes that revolve around getting someone to buy something that they would not have bought if they knew what they were buying. CMF has always done this to some extent, but this is too far. I always kind of hoped Lego would not resort to this. Congratulations Lego marketing, this will propably succeed at getting some kids to save up and spend all their money on a bunch of skydiver repeats.

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By in United Kingdom,

@BishBrick, good comment, my thoughts entirely...

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By in Netherlands,

Saw the gold minifigure yesterday. It still is a bad way from lego to market ther toys this way.
This only makes money to third party sellers, and no collector will find one.
The only way to stop this, is not to buy them of lego dealers, and everyone has to call lego and tell
them how bad this marketing is.

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By in Germany,

1000 €, this is crazy.

Any my son still hopes to get one... :-/

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By in United Kingdom,

This is ment to be a fair game, everyone should be able to buy them on May 1st but then Hungary gets them in March and now switzerland??? They have more luck finding them and at this rate of 2 already found, by the release date (May, 1st,) there might be none left. Come on Lego, what's the reason?

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By in United Kingdom,

In all honesty, the figure looks horrid. Even if it was one of the 16, I don't think it would be my first choice of 'wants'.

It will be interesting to see if they sell at that price. I suppose some people might jump at the chance to be 'first', but I'm guessing that most of these will end up on ebay once found after collectors and parents get a sniff of this.

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By in United Kingdom,

@101ThePolybagCollector101 wrote: "This is meant to be a fair game"... well, there is a certain amount of fairness in the way LEGO sells the regular CMF, despite the "blind" packaging but many people writing in this thread can answer your question to LEGO - regarding the gold minifigure - themselves ; "Come on Lego, what's the reason?", the answer: GREED!

Yes the G-word. LEGO is of course a big commercial, money-making company. But historically, it's also been (largely) regarded with respect as a manufacturer of the greatest toy in the world. For me, a LEGO fan of over 30 years, this situation, regarding the gold minifigure is a HUGE turning point in the way we should all look at LEGO. It is genuinely the first time I've seen LEGO in this sort of light.

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By in Germany,

For me some more questions arise with Mr. Gold:
- if you can feel a MF being worth so much, what will the true collectors do?
- what will store emplyees do, if they figure out they might luckily have that MF in their box?

So what we are going to see, is a lot of crumpled bags left over from those, who were lucky enough to get their hands on the bags first.

There's only one small light at the end of the tunnel: If TLC decides to put that Mr. Gold into every upcoming series AGAIN. But I fear they will change the design from series to series... :-(

It's not only a bad day for collectors, it's a bad day for every single FOL.

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By in United States,

April 16, 2013 @ 2:!0 AM | Seattle Washington

Fred Myer have release the Series 10 yesterday, we already complete it. But no luck for Mr. Gold...

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By in Gibraltar,

stop complaining people!

in my local shops they've just started with series 9 !

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By in Germany,

I have written this before - they way TLG is pushing exclusives is dangerous. It resembles the comic market of the ninties a lot - publishers were confident they could throw everything at their customers, exclusives here and there, variant covers, tie-ins, what-not. It eventually led to the market collapsing.
With Mr. Gold being so scarce and valuable, everybody will try to feel for it. I used to buy whole boxes of the series off the internet, something I will surely not do with this series. I will probably skip it altogether, I think the series are being released to fast one after another anyway. I want a box that is actually fresh (let's face it, it is extremely easy to open the seal and make it look like it was never opened). TLG will have to shrinkwrap the boxes with custom shrinkwrap with logos in the future to ensure the boxes have not been looked through (like they do with trading cards). I really fear for people's enthusiasm concerning not only the cmfs, but other exclusives, too. Enough is enough, really.

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By in United Kingdom,

Agree with original post. Appalling decision by Lego Group. Hopefully the first and last time they do something so stupid and repugnant.

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By in United States,

For those of you who don't or haven't collected other toy lines, this is the norm, sadly enough. Companies constantly try to generate attention and collector hysteria by producing extremely rare "chase figures" and "variants" that do nothing but tick off collectors and encourage scalping. Many of these figures never even reach the shelves because store employees poach them directly from the case boxes. It's sad that LEGO is jumping into this abusive practice.

Given that even relatively small companies like Brickarms have the ability to create chrome pieces, it's entirely possible these are home-made knockoffs. They may also be the real thing taken straight from the production line by factory employees, or they could be production samples or slightly defective factory discards. (If you were a factory worker and knew something that could be concealed in your palm fetches $1,000 or more, you'd be tempted to steal 'em, too.)

On a side note, this whole blind-bagging thing was already a big screw-you to collectors. LEGO has always wanted you to spend a fortune trying to collect all of the figures in each series. Mr. Gold is merely an amplification of this: blind-bagged AND ridiculously rare.

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By in Australia,

Surely any collector with any common sense wouldn't pay those ridiculous prices before the series has been officially launched. There will also be months of stock availability to come to have a chance of legitimately finding one. While I really don't like it when people buy up limited sets to sit on them for a later profit, it's the world we live in with every LEGO set released being a limited edition.

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By in United States,

At least some Lego employees are going through the boxes they've received now, before they even put them out. Saw a post on reddit from someone who claimed to be a Lego employee and had gone through X number of boxes with no luck. I don't think TLG would be happy to know that. Hope they're reading this.

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By in United Kingdom,

I was annoyed when it was announced that there was a 17th Minifig to collect in the Series of 16. And the chances of finding one was always going to slim. It takes the collecting part out of it and the paying for it part kicks in. Which doesnt seem to benefit the collector or Lego. I suggested to my other half that they will probably all go for £50 on ebay... slightly out I think. The more important thing to me now is the fact that its dreadful. The poster isnt chrome, its sort of pearl gold. I dont really like Chrome so im not interested in it now anyway, even for £5 on ebay.

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By in United Kingdom,

Oo shiny! ^Agreed^ I never knew it would be in chrome so I also think the marketing art is misleading. I always hated those golden street mimes anyway. This is like the Super Heroes Comic Con MFs except I wanted a couple of those.

I'm getting memories of being unable to find all the foil (chrome) Transformers stickers I needed as a kid due to their rarity.

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By in United Kingdom,

To be honest, I love the irony in it. A greedy, monocled Mr. Gold with a diamond-topped golden walking stick. Just look at the face print! How wonderfully in-your-face and un-PC.

Seriously, I believe most of the criticism is far from fair. No matter how Lego would address "special items", a good share of them will always end up in the hands of people who are willing to put money or time to work in order to acquire them. Lego can't be blamed for having discovered the "collector" as customer, or paraphernalia and X-selling as income source.

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By in Switzerland,

5000 produced, but I don't think that even half of that number will be in stores. Most likely Lego employees are finding way to receive early bonus.

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By in Singapore,

Is that the actual staff?

Many sellers are selling complete set of 16 minifigs. I guessed they have higher chance to find it since they will be opening many boxes.

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By in Austria,

Wishful thinking: The seller should donate at least 50% of the purchase price to charity.

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By in United Kingdom,

We all knew this would happen. The first few would come onto eBay and command ridiculous prices. We all knew that the resellers who bought a lot (I mean a LOT) of s10 boxes would probably find at least 1 Mr Gold. I suspect the high price is to pay for all the boxes they have bought and obviously they are first to resell.

It's dangerous on turning into other collectible markets where the less rare figs 'crash' in value and you instantly lose a high percentage of what you paid unless you pull the 'chase' or 'super rare' figs. I've already seen and experienced it and it's not something I want to repeat. It's nice to know all figures can retain most of their value.

As for the appearance, I think Mr Gold proves Pearl Gold and Chrome Gold don't mix well IMO.

I'll maybe still try get one but the price is miles too high at the moment.

I just hope they don't repeat this in other series'.

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By in United States,

wow just wow...

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By in New Zealand,

On the one hand they treat AFOLs as if we're trying to 'get one up on them' by getting an occasional small discount on exclusives (at a great hassle to ourselves), whilst using the excuse that they're at war with resellers.
On the other hand they do stupid things like this which will only feed the worst of the worst of the reseller community (e.g. the ones who work in retailer stockrooms and rifle through stuff before it goes on display).

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By in United States,

Just don't think about it, that's the trick. :S This is probably just what they want, more people talking about it, and getting it.

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By in Germany,

The single pearl gold piece on the staff looks oddly out of place.

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By in United Kingdom,

Problems with this (some points already mentioned)-

1 - A bunch of super rares always end up in the hands of Ebay scalpers, giving something that supposed to be fun a horrid profit grabbing edge.

2 - ANY competition involving the item (ticket/figure etc) being printed/bagged and shipped out will always end up having wierd distribution numbers around the world, for instance Italy might get 30% of them of which most of them are in the capital whereas Austrailia might only get 3% of them and its one little toy shop near the coast. Theres too many variables

3 - People having access to or much easier access to early pickings, be it living near a factory or working in a store for first picks.

4 - limited number availible, in a world of billions of people only 5000? (of which a lot will not be availible) ridiculous number for a "fun collectable toy"

If Mr gold was something simple like 1 in every 3 or 5 cases I would be MUCH happier with that even if it still promotes early picking.

I really hope Lego do not promote this kind of thing again it only helps the scalper, NOT the company and NOT the fans, at this rate they could become as bad as Mattel >_>

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By in Belgium,

The new Technic Crawler 4x4 designed by a user, will also have a limited number of sets, 20.000.

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By in United States,

Lego should just release the Minifigures on sets.

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By in United States,

So much frustration coming across as anger?!

Though we are fans of the bricks, remember that our world is based on supply and demand. Yes, it is saddening that Lego has gone the route of the "super rare," but someone at the company said this was a good idea... and sadly, it most likely will increase sales.

Do not forget that Lego was basically bankrupt 13 years ago. This company exists to offer high-quality bricks, but it also exists to find ways to earn profit. As a former marketing exec, I know a company's goal is to create excitement around their brand, to gain attention and hopefully sell more product. Trust me, I do believe (in the short term) that the Mr. Gold offering is going to do just that... what is often overlooked is the externality-effect. Who will quit buying due to frustration... and will that loss of shopper be offset by new shoppers created through the new marketing move? I'd say, in the current Lego-boom, this small event will be an overall bonus for Lego (yet not for those of us who can only afford to purchase one set or one box).

The scalpers, as Lego K labelled them, will profit, if they can find ways to acquire the figures. That acquisition is expensive, though. Payoff is huge on this one, but how many loose mini-figs is that seller holding... hoping... they can resell? They are taking a gamble... not just with their asking price, but with the level of purchase, too.

I hope to get a Mr. Gold. Will I, 95% sure I will not. I am a realist, though. If I really wanted one, I would go back into marketing and leave teaching. That way, I could afford to purchase 50 boxes an hope to secure a Mr. Gold. In the end, I'll just enjoy building with the pieces I do own.

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By in United States,

Is there really a difference between a stockroom employee pulling a hot item and buying it and the guy who enters the store the moment it opens to search for and buy the hot item? When I worked at Target there were several guys who came in first thing every truck day to try and grab the rare Hot Wheels cars before anyone else could get them. In either case the hot item is gone before the average person has a chance and it goes up on eBay for way more than it is worth.

I like the idea suggested about a code to send in to claim a prize. I would even like to see the booklet in every pack have a code, some really lucky folk could win a chase figure but there could also be better odds to win $5 off a S@H order or some other sort of discount that would be a fun surprise. No pack feeling would help anyone and the coupons would only drive more Lego sales

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By in United Kingdom,

More proof that capitalism rules the world.

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By in United Kingdom,

@krklint I'm not angry or frustrated... just a bit depressed. LEGO may have been essentially bankrupt 13 years ago, but they bounced back very quickly and have been doing well for a number of years now. Your points are essentially correct but you ignore what some of us feel... that the release of this figure and the way it has been put into the market by LEGO is a change in attitude for them and certainly not in a good thing for anyone else but them.

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By in {Unknown country},

Do keep in mind that this could be the first instance of Mr. Gold being sold in the marketplace and when more of Mr. Gold is selling there, prices will go down. Thus to judge about profiteering and scalping by looking at Eur999 at the moment is quite inadequate. Ask yourself that if it finally stable down to be around Eur200, will it be a reasonable pricing then, for a limited figure such as this? Only the person who can't wait longer and have the money to spurge will buy from this seller at this moment. And this is a reasonable value to ask when you are the one and only one offering it the first time.

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By in United States,

This is why I have no interest in "rare" items. Like many have stated, no REAL collector and lover of the MFS will be able to just "feel" for it like usual. All of the packets will have been sifted through or all bought up. Not to mention that the only reason people want this thing is because of its rarity. I have no interest in rarities. In the long run, I would still prefer my old Gandalf the Grey minifigure over this gold one. But that's just my opinion.

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By in United States,

Has anyone thought that this might be a custom FAKE?! 2 by the same seller? Plus how does he know what number they are without opening the bags? Let alone, I doubt they are numbered?

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By in United States,

Well, better 5000 than 5 like Willy Wonka right?

I've never collected any of the minifigures as I don't have a need for them with the exception of making sig figs of my friends and trying to be accurate, but I have Bricklink for that. I have no need for Mister Gold, but $1300 is way over the top. I can understand $500 but it is also just a few pieces. Sure, it's a lot more rare than Millenium Falcon Leia or Han from 2000 but in the grand scheme of things, having one minifig that I can never do anything with in the context of both build and display, I'd rather have a bunch of bricks.

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By in United Kingdom,

@starfire2 If you look on the ebay listing he also has a picture of the insert, which includes a printed number (whatever) of 5000.

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By in Hong Kong,

for $1300 you could buy an ounce of actual gold today
:-)

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By in United States,

Unfortunately for us mere mortals, there are plenty of collectors with millions and millions of dollars who would not blink at paying $1000 for an extremely rare collectible item that catches their eye. It's good to be the king.

As to a single seller having two of them, who's to say he didn't buy them locally from people for hundreds of dollars each before hand? There was no need for him to actually randomly find two himself.

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By in United States,

Lego probably should have done 1 per box or something... Or they could've just made it its own "top o the line" figure for $25 or something. The way it is now is a little silly and even goes against the companys own statements regarding the figures. Trading them, etc. And why they went against the bar coding.

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By in United Kingdom,

Phew, they didn't get it wrong when they decided to call him Mr Gold.

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By in New Zealand,

This is kind of off-topic, but also related. The people who this really hurts is the kids who dream of finding the "magic" gold figure ala Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Instead its been turned into a business where the highest bidder wins.

Now Lego aren't entirely at fault, but there are far more equitable ways of them being able to do this - such as making it a redeemable voucher inside a packet, that can't be discerned from the outside or by weight or feel.

Where I come from, it feels like Lego stopped really caring about the kids a long time ago - over here, Lego is so expensive that for all sets, we pay twice the amount in USD that kids in the US do for their Lego. The only people who can really afford to collect Lego here are AFOLs and kids with rich parents.

It sucks to know kids who sit all day dreaming and looking at their Lego catalogues, but who never get most of the sets they want because Lego charges twice the USD amount for them.

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By in United States,

I think the marketing by TLG is clever. Look at all of you crying, cheering, and lusting over this minifig. Heck, there were only 5 golden tickets to Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory. Wonka sold 10 tons of chocolate bars too because of that.

For the cryer's: This is capitalism. TLG is in business to make money. What is a business' main goal? TLG has you crying over not being able to acquire a golden piece of plastic. Brilliant!

I think Lego's marketing and handling of the press is spot on. Good luck to everyone looking for the golden minifig. If you're one of the lucky 5,000 then enjoy your windfall any way you like.

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By in United States,

Speaking of which, it's exactly like that classic movie where the adults (wealthy ones) bought loads of boxes of the bars just to find the ticket. Question though, is it REAL gold? Silly question I know, but just wondering because at teh prices listed above it seems it may be a little cheaper to actually get a 'real gold' Minifigure. lol

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By in United States,

I jist found out that you can pre-order series 10 on the toysrus website

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By in United States,

That is one ugly CMF. . . If I find one I have no desire to open it. And seriously, I'd rather have the UCS Millennium Falcon for$ 1,300.

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By in United Kingdom,

$1,300 ... really?

I was expecting some steep prices on eBay, but not to that extreme. That is more than twice as much as I was expecting. Trouble is, now a price has been set they will all be ridiculously expensive.

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By in United States,

Here is my take. I have two kids 7 & 10 who both love legos. Of course they both want one of these. They have all the CMF except a few from series 1. I totally understand the frustration people are having over this. However, if Legos were not so popular and worth so much in the aftermarket, you would not have nearly as many collectors. I just saw on Ebay that you can buy the old Statue of Liberty set for $1200. Where is the outcry with that? Being able to profit from Legos is not a bad thing. And as far as this guy trying to sell these Mr. Gold for $1200 on Ebay, good luck. Just because it is listed for such a high amount doesn't mean he will sell them. And if he does find one sucker to buy it at this price, that doesn't mean others will be able to profit this much for these guys.

I buy tons of legos for my kids, but I also sell many of their legos on Ebay. If I was not able to get some of our money back, I would not buy nearly as many sets for them. Now what I have a real problem with Lego marketing is the stupid VIP Valentine Keychain that they sent out. Our family has racked up over 12,000 VIP points in the past few years. And we did NOT get a keychain sent to us. The lego company needs to figure out a way to reward its most loyal customers. So if that means sending out a special minifigure once a year, great. That way the people that spend the most on legos in their stores may be able to get a little bit of their money back by selling the special minifigure. Or if they want to keep it, great. That's my 2 cents.

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By in United Kingdom,

HOW MUCH!?!?!?!!?!?!?!!??!!??!?!?¬!?!??!?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!????????????????????????

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By in Sweden,

Capitalism may "rule the world", but a company lives and dies by its customers. Brand value is worth more in the long run than a quick buck, and all these limited edition, hard-to-find minifigures etc. they've been pumping out lately do nothing but lower my opinion of the LEGO company, as I'm sure it does for many others.

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By in United Kingdom,

@greenwithenvy - "For the cryer's: This is capitalism. TLG is in business to make money. What is a business' main goal? TLG has you crying over not being able to acquire a golden piece of plastic. Brilliant!"

I think you miss the point here. I work at a Lego retail store and the Mr. Gold situation has been a grumbling since the new year, because it's inevitable that customers are going to come in and ask, one-by-one, for the staff to feel out a minifigure that we are likely not even going to receive in delivery. The company has already told us that we are prohibited from doing so with any of the characters this time round ('feeling' for earlier series figs was known but not stopped), and this will leave families frustrated. Other visitors will likely then crowd around the boxes to find their figures.

The chances of lower staff getting a Mr. Gold are also close to zero, as they are not allowed to 'feel' during work time if the figures are for themselves. So few people have a higher ground than anyone else.

What I would say to fans is simply this: let your voice be heard. Don't be afraid to contact the company with your frustrations, because they really do listen to customers and act. With enough feedback, they may realise their mistake.

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By in United States,

I remember when the first white Boba Fett appeared on Ebay it sold for $600, later on however it was selling for as little as $25. So I won't be surprised if the mr. gold figure drops below $150.

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By in United States,

@Nesquik, nah, I didn't miss it, I think you have, especially as a TLG employee.

Simply, if TLG didn't make exclusives then they'd sell less, and you'd not have a job at a retail Lego store. You don't mean to tell me that people grumbling is a bad thing do you? Parents and/or collectors standing in line waiting to pay for something they don't know is a winner or not. Keyword is 'pay'. Removing cash from someone else's willing wallet.

Lego has created a wonderful marketing and business machine. Children the world over love their products and they're going to market to the best of their ability to sell as much plastic gold as they can. You think 5,000 Mr. Gold's was an accident? No. It was a thought out and crafted marketing decision. It's paying off.

As long as kids (and let's face it, kids are TLG's largest customer either directly or through their parents) desire Legos there will be marketing and active capitalism. You should thank your employer for solidifying your employment.

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By in Slovakia,

Now is 1 of them sold ! Who paid that crazy price ?

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By in United States,

I'm more or less indifferent to complaints about the rarity. The idea that a minifigure exists does not create any kind of need for collectors to own it, and if this figure weren't a chase figure he probably wouldn't exist. He's meant almost more as a token/prize than a traditional minifigure, and so suggestions that creating him is any more underhanded than any other type of sweepstakes/contest end up feeling a bit sour.

As I often point out, TLG did something similar with BIONICLE Krana-Kal masks in 2003. One white metal variant had around the same rarity as these (5,000 total); there was also a sterling silver variant of which only 75 were produced! You had to buy an $8.00 Bohrok-Kal set to even have a chance of obtaining one of these-- they weren't sold individually or in the smaller collectible packs. And generally, the BIONICLE fandom was very understanding of this. It was more or less understood as a contest prize which would be outside the reach of most people, not a must-have collectible item which your collection would be incomplete without. I'm not entirely sure why the collectible minifigures' adult audience seems to have a harder time accepting this kind of promotion.

Then again, we see the same bickering any time there's an event exclusive at events like Toy Fair or Comic-Con, which often have even less chance of getting into the hands of average kids and collectors and are meant largely as souvenirs/memorabilia for the event. Perhaps minifigure collectors, unaccustomed to these kinds of marketing techniques, just feel entitled to easy access to every figure produced, unlike BIONICLE collectors who were used to mask collecting and the like being a major challenge and a complete collection being an ideal rather than a commonly-achievable reality.

The next year instead of putting prizes in sets, little cards were packaged with the sets that would have an "instant win" offer like you'd see on soda cans... open the set and look at your card to see if you won any of the sweepstakes prizes. These included some typical sweepstakes prizes like TVs and signed comics as well as a solid gold LEGO disk as one of the higher-valued prizes. Ideally, this could have been done with Mr. Gold as well, but perhaps TLG had problems with this method in the past (perhaps a number of winning cards were never redeemed, or perhaps getting the prizes to winners was a hassle, or perhaps it was hard to ensure that sets without a physical prize inside were distributed evenly across the globe).

Now, I AM a bit worried about the fact that one seller has acquired two of these already, because it suggests either he had a less-than-legal means of acquiring it (sneaking it from a factory or something) or the distribution of these figs is not very even and a number ended up in one seller's order or one seller's area. With that said, it's totally possible he came upon these through legal, fair means, ordering a large batch of figs he planned to identify individually anyway and taking this guy out to sell at a premium. It does unfortunately keep two kids from having that unmatched thrill of opening the two figs themselves, but on the whole it is probably not causing any measurable harm to the fan community at large, because chances are toy stores and other brick-and-mortar toy sellers are ordering the vast majority of boxes of figs and will be putting the boxes out on store shelves, without attempts to identify the figs beforehand.

Hopefully kids will be a bit more reasonable about this and will be able to recognize that if they get ANY fig, they've gotten what they paid for. All the CMFs are lovely, high-quality designs and since there's already an element of chance in the typical CMF purchase, kids should know not to be heartbroken over not getting a fig they want, just as they would about any set or figure they miss out on.

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By in United States,

My impressions.. the most disappointing thing is the Minifigure itself, the rest was just predictable.

On a side note, the picture is really awful… and looking at the way the accessories are assembled tells me that this guy does not play with LEGO very often.

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By in Netherlands,

besides all this, i am still going to try to find one with feeling at every shop i come across.
No guts, no glory as they say.

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By in Malaysia,

people nowadays make money out of Lego and lost the love/fun of collecting it.
How sad.

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By in United States,

I really am quite disappointed with all the complaining. Its not as if this is actually part of the series but an EXTRA fig in celebration of being the 10th series. The odds of getting one of these have always been extremely improbable so it was never meant for every collector to collect. I do however agree with one of the comments above saying that there should have been a "You have won" paper in random bags instead of the actual figure. There are a lot of exlusives that are rare for instance the valentines keychain LEGO sent out this year. Just because some ebayer is greedy asking ridiculous price doesn't make LEGO responsible. I'm siding with LEGO on this one and still think LEGO is the greatest toy company around even though I may never get some of the rare products.

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By in Canada,

I've read through the various comments and largely agree with everyone's sentiments. Personally I like the idea of having a Mr. Gold figure. However the limited run of 5000 and the fact that you have to feel for it means price gouging at its worse and the kids or AFOLs (like me) will not have a decent chance of finding one with others or employees having first chance at it.

I would have preferred a code voucher on the instruction manual to redeem with Lego. Would have meant that they could sell a lot more CMF in the packs and would truly randomised getting Mr. Gold. There are a lot of sets I see on the after-market going for a lot of money but I wouldn't spend 150 pounds or more on such a figure. I love collecting my Lego but not for that kind of money for a figure no less.

Who knows perhaps they will think better next time to release such a thing for the fans and kids. Never know they may just release into the market down the road a bunch of Mr. Golds or offer it as a promo with 50 GBP purchase one month. That would certainly kill off the price gouging sellers and still enable Lego to earn a profit.

All things considered, I'd rather have Lego stick around as a company and keep their coffers full to produce more. I'm more concerned about the Chinese factory and how can their versions be kept out of the market. But that is another topic :P

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By in Canada,

I've said it before, and I'll say it again: Bad idea, and just a weensy bit hypocritical.

TLG is trying to dissuade secondary sellers from hijacking the kids' hobby market by limiting sales on S@H and even writing letters to secondary sellers about it.

Then, they do this, which is virtually guaranteed to do exactly what TLG says it is trying to prevent.

Bad idea.

Hypocritical.

*blowing raspberries*

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By in United Kingdom,

I don't see what all the fuss is about, the figure looks hideous anyway

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By in United States,

@BishBrick No idea why you're mad, I mean "depressed", at Lego for this. Shouldn't you be "depressed" at this ebay seller? Seems kinda obvious. And personally, if I get Mr. Gold, great. If not, it's not the end of the world. LOL at all you greedy collectors complaining that you won't be able to get this guy so it can collect dust on your shelf! So you'll probably have a gap in your collection, DEAL WITH IT! We can't have everything in this world!

Like Aanchir said, I think of this as a prize, a "Congrats! You Won!" type of thing. Companies have been doing this for AGES.

DON'T let this make you view the Lego Company in a different light. They've done this before, with the gold C-3PO hidden in the Star Wars sets and stuff like that. How is this different? I still haven't seen them do anything greedy enough to really disappoint me... yet.

I like Mr. Gold. :) I think this is a cool and fun idea, and I will certainly hope to get him. If not, whatever. Series 10 does look like one of the best series yet!

Man, I'm so glad I'm not burdened with a negative mind like everyone else on the Internet.

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By in United States,

GOD! I wish I had one to sell on ebay. That would pay off some the bills.Oh well. ;)

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By in United Kingdom,

One of these has actually been sold??!!! who would pay that price for a minifigure? I also agree with the points already made, these things are going to go for thousands on second hand markets, and I'm suprised lego didn't see that coming. Plus, does anyone actually like this minifigure? I personally see no appeal at all. If it wasn't gold it would just be a fairly ordinary man in a top hat. I really don't like it.

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By in United Kingdom,

Those prices are ludicrous.Though I really want mr Gold, I wouldn't pay that much.

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By in United States,

@grievous952 - Actually, an ordinary man in a top hat would look significantly better than this.

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By in {Unknown country},

2 minifigs from the same seller: Good job, Lego in spreading those figs across the globe!

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By in Germany,

There is no way any of us will find one in a store, if the employees know anything about this figure. I know from local toy stores and even the Lego store that they pre-search the boxes for rares, and this happened long before Mr Gold. The guy with the 2 auctions on Ebay has a toy store, he did the same. I would do the same. Before some sweaty middle-aged nerd comes in and browses with his sticky fingers through them and picks out what he can sell on Ebay - I would do it before him! I completely understand what's going on. As a customer I lost more and more interest in the minifigs through this, cause it's hard to come by some of the more rare figures already, due to this.

Collecting is only fun as long it is fun. Collecting doesn't equal fun. I can always stop and no one's forcing me to.

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By in United Kingdom,

@dcmal
Yeah its like a super ironic tribute to the worst resellers/scalpers out there:

'Mr Gold: The villain who creeps around kids layouts at night, selling off all their most valuable sets'.
They forgot to give him 3 things;
A) Mini 'box' of lego
B) Camera
C) Laptop

In addition to selling millions through his 5 ticket promotion, Willy Wonka also used unpaid foreign labour en masse at his factory, shunned health & safety and had wild animals working non stop in one section.
*With Mr Gold you will not inherit the Lego factory nor receive a lifetime's supply of Lego.

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By in United States,

@shawneboy - Comparing this to the prices of older sets is a false equivalency. There is a reason why the toy industry calls things like this a "chase" figure. They're designed for immediate scarcity and to generate buzz. The extremely inflated value is owed solely to the limited quantity and difficulty to find, both of which LEGO has exclusive control over.

On the other hand, sets like Cloud City or Cafe Corner are highly desirable now because they're off the market. They've appreciated naturally over time. But while they were still around, just about everyone had a chance at them--it's no different than vintage Star Wars toys, old baseball cards or other now-valuable things people wish they had bought way back when. It's only when you start intentionally (and cynically) manipulating the market forces that people get upset.

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By in Netherlands,

This is like april the 1st all over again. You should be glad with what you have. I wouldn't be able to buy a full set of every series and I'm not planning to do so. Just relax, it's not that big a deal. Besides, how do we know these two are real?

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By in United Kingdom,

@binaryeye Haha good point.

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By in United States,

@Modok- The extremely inflated value has not been set yet and I definately would not say LEGO is to blame. Just because an ebayer asks a ridiculous price does not mean he will get it and if he does then kudos to him for some fool paying the price. Please wait and hold your judgement of LEGO until after series 10 is actually out and the distribution facts have been assessed. There were more than 5000 "Mr. Chase" figures actually produced even though only 5000 will be going to official distribution. So there is a good probability that this ebayer got a hold of the minifigures from another source other than distribution. If after all 5000 "Mr. Chase" figures are in circulation and the aftermarket price remains this ridiculously high, I still would not say that LEGO was to blame but instead collectors who are willing to pay that price.

And to say that LEGO could foresee this is a far cry. What about Minecraft. People were buying that set for $200 and up. Was LEGO to blame for that as well? Guess what, LEGO fixed the aftermarket price by producing more sets. So I would say LEGO has a more than exemplary record.

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By in Germany,

Have you guys seen hordes of people buying Collectable Minifigures like Wonka's chocolate? :P

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By in United States,

If you think that the price is bad, don't buy it. I really don't see what the issue is. It's a marketing trick to get people to buy LEGOs. LEGO is not your friend, or your family, they are a company out to get your money the easiest way possible, and that's what Mr Gold is doing.

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By in Switzerland,

I've got no problem with Lego's idea. They could produce only one piece for the whole world, I don't care since I'm collecting only those figured that I like and not all of them.
But I have reasonable doubt that they will manage to export all 5000 pieces to the consumers. And that is not fair. Maybe Lego should take Coca Cola's idea- to put bar codes with figures in 10'th series and whichever 5000 users would submit most codes on the internet web site, they should get figure. But then again, those would be collectors and wouldn't be on ebay so quickly.
So I'm guessing that Lego is hoping for some free publicity- Lego figure sold for 2000 eur on ebay. Sounds great for marketing department.

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By in United Kingdom,

I am highly suspicious of this, firstly, as others have said getting two figures seems highly unlikely. Also, the lightsaber hilt piece seems to be missing an area of chrome which is a little odd if you ask me.

As for this as a marketing move for Lego, I do not mind to be honest and while I disagree with this in principle as it will deprive people of a truly 'complete' collection, I will likely be looking for a Minifigure on eBay or Bricklink assuming that I am not lucky enough to find one myself.

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By in United Kingdom,

@greenwithenvy - I am well aware that Mr. Gold is a "well thought out" marketing ploy as it will help make a profit. However, that doesn't make it profitable to the company's image.

Lego retail stores exist not solely to sell products, but to communicate with visitors. The questions and problems that people come in with only highlights the general strength of communities like Brickset, and most certainly the principle of the 'AFOLS'. Fans who take the time to understand Lego products and treat it as a hobby take certain things for granted, but you shouldn't underestimate the naivety of what must surely be at least 80% of the store's guests.

The fact remains that 'Mr. Gold' will frustrate a lot of families who don't understand to the full extent how hard this 'figure is to find. I have no doubt that fans and hobbyists will go to great lengths to try and find this character, but it is no fun when something like this comes along and you have to, basically, pretend that anyone can find 'Mr. Gold'. Not only this, but those customers who expect staff to find these characters at the click of a finger will now have to be turned away, and this will happen several times a day.

'Mr. Gold' is more suited as a prize that can be earned through creativity and imagination, such as a competition or event.

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By in United Kingdom,

^ I completely agree with your comment on staff in stores having a difficult time as parents demand that they feel through the box for a Mr Gold Minifigure, who will be turned away disappointed. That is one of my primary concerns about the entire ploy as I doubt many parents will be aware that the Minifigure is as rare as it is and will not understand why the staff cannot find one for them.

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By in United States,

If one of the Mr Gold figures did actually sell on eBay I'd bet it was purchased by one of the 'popular' YouTube Lego reviewers... no? That sure would drive some viewer traffic and revenue to that particular channel and certainly outweighing the cost of the figure itself. Being first on YouTube is key to viewership... so it seems.

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By in Denmark,

Why borther! The figure doesn't even look nice... :-) Seriously!

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By in United States,

@Nesquik- From my experience with LEGO retail stores, the employees seem clueless about LEGO as a hobby. I was a bit surprised that AFOLs are actually such a novelty that LEGO store employees seem extremely surprised and intrigued by the notion.

And as far as parents and kids having a problem understanding the idea that "Mr. Gold" is such a rarity and desperate search for "Mr. Gold", I think is absolutely absurd. Also in my experience from LEGO retail stores, employees have not been allowed to search for particular minifigs since series 3. At least every time I have been in a store since Series 3, the employees have told all the kids asking that they weren't allowed. I have several times been asked by a kid after recieving no help from a store employee if I could help them find a particular figure.

Also from observation of my times at the LEGO stores, the majority of customers treated the CMs like they were meant to be, like random toys you get from the egg toy machines. They simply grabbed a few packages without bothering to feel the contents. No complaints, no whining.... well at least until they got home with doubles. :D

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By in United States,

If I got one I would sell it. For cheap too. Its ugly :/ If it was a gold spaceman, then it would be awesome.

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By in New Zealand,

One of the ebay ones comes with a code: MF-Y6YGYT7J and a symbol showing it unlocking something at www.lego.com/minifigures .. but I cant see anything on the site to unlock. Does anyone know what it does?

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By in United Kingdom,

One sold and 22 offers on the other!! There are some CRAZY! Lego fans out there!

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By in United Kingdom,

I love the idea of a kid buying one of these, not knowing what it is and simply playing with it - as all lego should be in my opinion.

The particularly distasteful thing about this is that they can "found" through the packaging by prodding, fingering etc. Its not like a hidden ticket inside a chocolate bar.

To those who say the complainers just don't get Capitalisim etc. A business needs to keep its customer base happy and although I'm not going to stop buying Lego I don't like them for what they've done in this case.

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By in United Kingdom,

if i got one i wound be so happy

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By in United States,

Wow, that is ridiculous, good thing I don't collect the Collectible Minifigures. Also, for those who are complaining, if you are willing to pay that much, you are part of the problem.

The solution is simple: Refuse to buy it at an absurd price. If no one wants to buy it they will be forced to lower their price.

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By in Germany,

About the sold on ebay: I dont believe that.

Collecting minifigures is not that expensive. You can get a complete series on ebay for the same price, you would have to pay 16 figures in shops, but without risk and shipping! A few Euros every 4 months is not that much. So I guess minifigures collectors, like me, are not the ones to spend hundreds of Euros. So who of them would pay 1000E? I cant imagine.

I think, the best figure to compare Mr Gold with is chrome C3PO. That one was limited to 10.000 and sells on Ebay between 300 and 500E.But thats star wars. There are a lot more collectors who are used to pay ridiculious sums.
A realistic price would be somewhat around 100E. I would pay something between 60 and 70E.

But if I was the first to have one when there is no other figure on the market to get a realistic price and I would like to sell it for the best price, I would try to make people think, thats there are others who are willing to pay big money. For example by placing a second figure and closing the auction early. At that price it doesnt hurt to waste some money on ebay fees.

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By in United States,

Sure, I'd be happy to find one in a packet at a store. But the fact that people are selling them at ridiculous prices kind of defeats the point. It should be something that a kid could show his friends, "Hey, guess what, I got a Mr. Gold yeterday!" "Really? Awesome!". It can't be: "Hey guess what I just spent $1307.09 on a Mr. Gold minifigure on ebay!". Plus the whole thing about limiting the production number suggests that Lego is just after the money. I just think that Lego should have scrapped the Mr. Gold minifigure idea and prevented all this awfulness!

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By in Canada,

I don't know, Mr. Gold looks like something an avid Lego custom designer could do in their basement. I've browsed the odd site here and there, and I've seen a lot of custom pieces done up in chrome. I'm not going to go off on some rant calling it a fake, since either way I wouldn't be expecting someone to pay $1300 for a real Mr. Gold. If people want to spend crazy-money on a stupid minifigure, I guess that just answers the question as to why they're not married.

As for Lego's strategy; I think they wanted to bring back that excitement and generate a thrill for the hunt... all to mask up the fact that each modern CMF series is over-produced and will likely sit on the drug store shelves for months as opposed to a couple of days like with series 1 and 2. I'm surprised so many of you are complaining, but I suppose that's all because of the number produced as opposed to the extra work involved. I was honestly shocked to hear how many people could still by series 10 come home with a crate of CMF and sort out sixteen or more on your floor than return the rest. Maybe that's just to avoid the embarassment of sitting in a TRU for over an hour, but someone like myself never wanted to create the hassle in the first place. CMF are products of China, and the majority don't have a re-sale price above the MSRP in Canada, so my motivation to collect them went out the window as soon as they went from 'collectible' to being 'cute little display pieces'. CMF were never anything more than an addiction for me, and I'm much too old to behave like that. Lego got me good; no hard feelings though.

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By in United States,

@m. kalores - I'm not really talking about this specific eBay price. It may well fall once they all hit the market, but based on the total number of figures alone, it's going to be way more expensive than just about any other minifig. I wouldn't exactly consider it a victory if the going rate settles in at $200 or some such.

And again, none of this was necessary. Chase figures are the antithesis of fun, innocent collecting. It's the type of craven grab for attention and dollars that drives collectors nuts and frustrates children who don't understand why they can't just get their darn Mr. Gold. Again, I thought LEGO was above this type of game-playing.

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By in United States,

Mattel did the same kind of Treasure Hunt stunt with their HotWheels back in 1995. It really ruins things for the kids trying just to collect mini figures. May 1st is when all the scalpers will come out buying cases, cherry picking them and returning the rest for money back or store credit. Thank You Lego. I won't waste anymore of my income on your mini figures.

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By in United Kingdom,

This is like the VIP keyring all over again. I was lucky and received one of them but my chances of getting a mr gold are zero. It is like Lego are trying to get fans back up and make a quick profit for the shady people who will ransack boxes before they are put out for sale. I am old enough to remember collecting golden studs for free items and enjoyed it but these sort of promo's just seem to smack the fans in the face. Come on Lego you are better than this. Record profits and sales up and then this mess. Pull your fingers out and start looking after your fans not wind us up. Rant over looking forward to the new x-wing next month at least everyone who wants one can get it. And I am not happy about the lone ranger delay :-(

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By in United States,

This is ingenious by lego because I usually I will buy my 16 minifigure and it will take me 30 minutes to find, in this case I will feel packets till I find Mr. gold and as im feeling packets ill say well I guess I could get another of this one... In the end ill probable not get Mr. gold and get 3 sets.

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By in United States,

I agree with many others that the Mr. Gold deal is outrageous. The figure is indeed attractive, but there are so many costs, not to mention the morality of selling one for $3000, especially if said seller is not actually passionate about Lego. On the other hand, is anyone allowed to judge whether a single individual is entitled to a Mr. Gold? Is that just? This seems at once democratic and extremely elite and (obviously) exclusive. If I happen to find one, however, I don't think I will throw it away - I'll just keep it.

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By in United States,

I don't understand all of the complaining. If you don't like it don't buy it. Focus on sets you enjoy more. Personally I think it is a neat idea. The appeal of having an exclusive figure of this nature will probably make this series the most successful of the line. No one is being tricked or abused here. By the way LEGO is not selling the figure for $1000. If someone finds one and makes a ton of money off of it, well good for them.

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By in United States,

I personally am not complaining about the figure itself. I think the collective objection is more aimed at the idea that certain people deserve to have or sell the figure less than others. This idea, at its heart, may be fundamentally flawed, but that is a matter of debate.

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By in United States,

The way I see it is you most likely weren't going to find one anyway. At least now you have a better shot at it by forking up the cash if it means that much to you. All I can say is I'm so glad I don't collect minifigures!

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By in United States,

This is a long post, so I'll probably slip up and say something odd somewhere here. Point it out if you find it.

As a TCG (primarily Yugioh) player (and collector) I can understand why this is frustrating. Rare cards in Yugioh can fetch hundreds of dollars due to the utility of the card in a deck (or decks). Old cards can be worth similar prices - early pre-cards are worth hundreds apiece.

TLG may not be known for doing this, sort of thing, but it's not their first venture into collectibles. The first four years of BIONICLE had tons of collectibles and exclusives - gold, silver, chrome-plated, even platinum masks and krana, a solid gold disk, and so on. There were bashes to be won for contests even before BIONICLE. To get one of all of those collectibles would be next to impossible - at least one of those is unique.

Personally, I don't like this. As an obsessive collector of whatever catches my interest, I hate not being able to reach something. Yeah, it's a trick. It's a trick to get kids to buy bags to get a figure that they will never get. It's underhanded to do it with an audience this young, but they've done it. Companies are about profits. As much as I wish we lived in a world where it were otherwise, we don't.

I think this does tarnish their image, largely because people who collect CMFs feel cheated. Before, it was feasible for anyone to collect an entire series. However, now it's impossible to collect them all for all but 5000 people. The idea was that anyone could collect them. But it works.

If anything, I'm more pissed of their handling of LEGO City: Undercover (their first original game for a while, and by far their best one, discounting LEGO Battles, which was also obnoxiously given to Nintendo) as the game could easily have been adapted to another system but they gave it to Nintendo and as a result the greatest LEGO Game (not counting LU) is not available to most people.

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By in United States,

Now available at Fred Meyer stores in the Pacific Northwest

My Series 10 Box breakdown was as follows:

6x - Alien Avenger, Cyclops, Heroic Knight, Policeman
4x - Battle Mech, Chicken Suit Guy, Judge, Mermaid, Mr. Good and Evil, Roman Emperor
2x - Forest Maiden, Fortune Teller, Hollywood Starlet, Plumber, Roller Derby Girl, Waiter

http://www.flickr.com/photos/wiredforsound23/8655754865/

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By in United States,

I agree no one has the right to this figure more than anyone else, but is LEGO responsible for the unethical behavior of opportunist? Saying that I would not restrict the right of an individual that choses to sell the fig for whatever price they want, nor would I want to live in a place where one was restricted to do so. I do feel though that employees should face punishment for rifling through merchandise before it hits the shelves. I am sure that this type of behavior is against most company's policies. LEGO realizes collectivity is a huge selling point for older fans. The idea of exclusiveness will be more of an allure than turn off. I am excited about the possibility of stumbling across one of these guys even though realistically I know the odds are not in my favor.

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By in United States,

I hate the victim mentality. There is no trick! This is intended as a marketing device to get more people to buy the product, sure, but how are you being lied to or misled? I think it is absurd that people are saying this tarnishes the LEGO image. I can understand that all LEGO adult fans have a touch of OCD, me included, but outside of our sphere of conversation this will be embraced by most LEGO purchasers. Honestly think about the sets you cherish the most. 9 times out of 10 it is the most exclusive of your collection.

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By in United States,

I found 20 boxes of series 10 at my local Fred Meyer in Washington. I think I'd sell Mr.Gold if I find him. I'm gonna go check them all tomorrow and hope for the best!

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By in United States,

@Modok- I learned a long time ago when I was a kid, that life doesn't give everyone equally. My friends got 6 or 7 large lego sets for their birthdays while I only got one medium and possibly a small sized set for my birthday. Point is I didn't wish my friends would only get a medium and small sized set because thats all I got. As I stated before Mr Gold is a bonus not actually part of series 10. He is the 17th fig. It was an innocent attempt by LEGO to throw something extra in. The rarer the item, the more awesome it is for the kids who find one. And I think LEGO did an awesome job choosing a fig for this that a CM collector does NOT have to obtain to have a complete collection. I think it would be awesome if I find one but realistically I don't expect to find one and it doesn't bother me. I think most kids get that the chance for them finding a MR Gold is as slim as winning a contest in the LEGO club/magazine. And if a kid can't live without a Mr Gold then that kids parents need to do some explaining to him about what actually matters in life.

@wiredforsound- I do believe you mean series 9.

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By in United States,

What bothers me the most about this chase figure is that it is connected to this series which makes me feel like I won't be able to complete the set. I am an AFOL and I have been trying to complete all of the series because I am also a collector. I used to collect comics and my goal was to complete the series of comics I was collecting. I am now trying to collect Harry Potter minifigs and my ultimate goal will be to have one of every figure. The challenge of this is that I didn't buy all of the Harry Potter sets when they were first released and have only just started. If this Mr. Gold was just a random figure that you could find in a random set of Legos it wouldn't bother me as much but because it is tied to this specific miniseries I now feel as though my set will never be complete without that figure. I certainly can't afford to pay that much money to get one. I still don't know how I will get a Mad Eyed Moody at a reasonable price ! LOL But I don't feel that the Lego company was trying to do a greedy thing here, I just think they came up with a really bad idea and I hope they have someone following the opinions being expressed by the fans who use this site. It would really suck if they do this again.

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By in United States,

I totally agree with you M. Kalores!

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By in United States,

I was upset when I thought this was one of the 16. Seeing as how it's an extra 17th, and isn't on the enclosed pic of the 16 figures, I can just pretend it never existed right?

They're releasing these series too quickly anyway, I can't even pretend to try to buy all 161.

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By in Canada,

For that price what retailer wouldn't weigh the box or go looking for the MR GOLD.

The chances of it falling into a childs hands is very rare, and a shame.

But.... Even in Willy Wonka charlie found a ticket, there is hope.

That being said I still sent my complaint to Lego via email.

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By in New Zealand,

It may be an "innocent" attempt by Lego to put something extra/bonus in - but they really need to wake up a bit and consider that there are far better ways of doing this. It just ends up breaking a whole bunch of kid's hearts, whereas people with money and access to dodgy ways of getting minifigures (such as weighing boxes of them) get to benefit.

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By in United Kingdom,

Well if an idiot has enough money to buy a single minifig at those prices then he deserves to be parted from that money as quick as possible! I seriously can't be bothered enough about this to get angry and unless I stumble across one of these figs by accident then i'll not get one. Oh well, too bad ;)

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By in France,

Wow ! So many reactions about this news, so many people ready to express their anger ... Speaking about unfairness :
War is unfair.
Famine is unfair.
Children with heavy diseases is unfair.
Sadly, there are more important battles that raise less fervor ...

As an AFOL myself, I can figure all the disappointment feelings about MrGold but please let's keep all this plastic related worries at the appropriate level. Move on guys !

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By in Indonesia,

with that crazy price I guess the first one to find Mr. Gold in your local store is that local store employee!!!!
hahaha

A lot of people want to have a complete minifigures set (me for example)..... until lego decided to make Mr. Gold

oh well.....

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By in United Kingdom,

@yvo uhm... you do know that this is a LEGO website, where people come to (among other things) discuss LEGO news. Your point is pointless I'm afraid and your suggestion that anyone writing and discussing this topic is putting LEGO before war, famine and children with diseases is just idiotic. Fortunately there is more to get passionate about in this world then just the things you describe.

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By in United States,

Well some good news came from this 6 roman commanders in a box.=)

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By in France,

@ BishBrick : Judging people you don't know just from one sentence is not a maturity proof, really. Before concluding that my point is "just idiotic" maybe you could consider you didn't get it or it is simply different from yours (yes, it can happen).

From what I read here on BS and in some other Lego related forums, some people take this situation way too seriously. They become really mad about not being able to get Mr Gold or other exclusives. They just focus on what they can't get and not on what they have. In another hand, I rub shoulders with kids who have cancers and other serious diseases, and I'm just admirative how they barely never complain, and just take the good things life brings to them.

My point was just to say that not being able to get a certain minifig when you already can have 16 new ones is not the end of the world. Just enjoy what you can have and move forward.

That's my opinion, share it or not, but don't disrespect.

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By in Republic Of Korea,

it could be easier to make a Mr. Gold by painting a pearl gold minifig with chrome gold paint - minus the head and torso decals - then it would be a Mr.Gold statue.

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By in United States,

yvo is exactly right. I think the complaining has snowballed. This is mob mentality in action. I haven't read one legitimate post stating a good reason why this is a bad idea. I just see a lot of selfishness. I say enjoy the hunt!

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By in United Kingdom,

@yvo I'll say it again... this is a LEGO website for discussions about LEGO. Some of those discussions are positive some negative. If you look back through this thread at my previous posts as well as others, it's not wanting to own the figure that's the problem for a lot of people (including me - I really don't want it), it's what this figure represents in terms of LEGO's changing attitude to marketing.

When I say that your point is idiotic I mean it. You are, as I pointed out suggesting that everyone who gets, angry, upset, sad or depressed by this situation is ignorant of the bigger problems of the world... but (as you like to point out to me) you have no right to judge or disrespect those who write here. People get angry about what LEGO are doing because they have a passion for it, just as they could all have a passion for highlighting and doing something for the less fortunate of this world, away from this website.

Keep your sanctimonious statements to other, more relevant websites.

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By in United Kingdom,

The main point is that scalpers are taking full opportunity of this and commanding outrageous prices. It's morally wrong, greedy and selfish. That's the part that bothers most here. They should at least donate a good percentage to charity but probably won't.

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By in United States,

I don't think that this is an "innocent" thing in any way. That would indicate that TLG has no idea what happens when you insert a rare like this into a box, and that it might fall into the hands of children. It's highly unlikely that this wasn't a calculated, informed decision made with the intention to get collectors to go nuts looking for it.

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By in United States,

...which is equivalent to the current price/oz of REAL gold. Coincidence?

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By in United States,

@maniac- I fail to see where selling Mr. Gold for 2k is morally wrong. Mr. Gold is NOT a neccecity for life. No one is forced to buy it. And not every collector was meant to have a MR Gold. Luxury items are always overpriced. I'm not going to spend 2k for Mr Gold neither would I spend $20. I might spend $10. What is the value of a minifig? The value that you are willing to pay. If people aren't willing to be patient but have to be the first to own a Mr Gold, how is that LEGO's fault?

What really gets me is that Series 10 is only out in extremely limited circulation and already people are judging that LEGO has miscalculated and that scalpers will be the only ones or the majority of ones to get the fig. If indeed this is true, I am sure LEGO will not at all be pleased and will come up with a solution as well as some retailers getting their hand slapped majorly.

People will always find a way to cheat. And to be honest most of us on here are probably cheaters unless you buy random CM bags and open them to see what you got instead of feeling for them.

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By in France,

@ BishBrick : OK I give up trying to explain my reasonning to you. I usually like to confront my opinions with someone who think a different way, because it's a way for both to learn. But I also know that arguing with someone who just want to have the last word is a waste of time.

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By in United States,

M. Kalores and Yvo have made great points. It seems as though there is a lot of misdirected anger at LEGO for the actions that others "might" carry out. To me I feel like this is a fundamental flaw in your thinking Brickbish. Is LEGO responsible for the abuse of its product by parties outside of its control. I have said it many times.....There is no victim here! If you want the fig buy it or find it. This is a special insert that is not part of the 16 figure series. It is an added bonus, not a cruel prank. You are also implying that LEGO is changing its attitude of marketing. And I am detecting a hint of cynicism about LEGO's treatment of consumers? What are you basing this on?

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By in United Kingdom,

@m. kalores - Yes, It's not an absolute must for life and not everyone will get it. To think that charging $2k is alright though is crazy.
When did I say people are forced to buy it? I'm saying that they should charge a more realistic price (take a good estimate) based on other similar figures with numbered quantities. Not blaming LEGO here like you seem to think. It's the scalpers.

It's still early days though and the market price will soon settle to a more realistic point for the people willing to pay the most.

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By in United States,

@maniac- just because I don't like the price does not make it morally wrong. I can put a piece of toilet paper up on ebay and ask 2k for it and its not morally wrong. Stupid yes, but not morally wrong. Suppose you had a valuable painting that you wished to sell, would you take a low bid for it if you know that you could get 10x the amount from another buyer? I think not, and you wouldn't be morally wrong.

If someone values the fig so much that he is willing to pay 2k for it, he evidently values the fig more than me and therefore deserves it more than me but the seller can only profit if there is someone willing to pay his price. Would I consider the buyer wise? No, but it really is none of my business.

To sum it all up: I might wish I could have something that I will never be able to get even if I try my best, but I can't blame others of wrongdoing for me not having it unless it is something that is a necessity for life.

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By in United States,

@Trenth

You may view the minifigure as an extra, but many people consider it as much a part of the series as any other.

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By in United Kingdom,

@m. kalores I'm sorry but your meaning of 'morally wrong' must be very different then. That's not a valid example either because they know anyone will likely not pay $2k/ the higher amount for the figure in question.

If that's your opinion though, fair enough.

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By in United Kingdom,

Like the Iron Lady, Mr Gold does nothing but divide opinion :)

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By in France,

When market laws are involved it´s kind of hard to talk about morality.
The basis of those laws is that the seller try to get the higher price of a rare item and only the one(s) who can and are willing to pay the higher get the item. It´s even more obvious when auctions systems are involved, like it is on eBay. No morality here, no more than in jungle where the weaker get killed and only the stronger survive. Would you complain about jungle not being fair ?

[As a side note : Market laws still may seem unfair to you ? Well, did your last meal make you think the same ? ... Why, would you ask ? Just because the same laws cause famine in some countries (here is why my first post was not so irrelevant). But that's another subject.]

About the frustration of not being able to get that figure, just take it like you would do about the last Ferrari model : you'd like to have it (like I would too ofc) but you probably won't. Oh ! Good news : there is a tiny - still existing - chance you get one. So the situation is finaly better than in the Ferrari case !

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By in United Kingdom,

I haven't logged in for a long time, but just wanted to say that the whole situation around this figure - the idea, the marketing, its rarity, the ridiculous eBay prices and the figure itself - are just plain hideous.

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By in United States,

Oh no, how dare a business create hype surrounding their products. They just might make money to pay their employees, grow their business and secure their financial future. How dare they!

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By in United States,

Love that comment! Exactly my thoughts @The Brick Show

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By in United States,

@maniac- indeed we must have different meanings. the old babel syndrome at work.

Could be I'be been in retail far too long as well. The constant tightrope act of finding the perfect balance of maximizing profit yet keeping prices low enough to retain customers has given me a perspective on sales that others may not have.

These sellers are in no hurry to sell Mr Gold but are just testing the market. They know that they have a rare product weeks perhaps months before any real competition so they have time to sit on their product. I doubt any of them actually expect to sell at that price. When you are the first seller in this kind of market, your greatest fear is to sell too low so you set a ridiculously high price and see what kind of offers you get. Sometimes there are unfortunately foolish buyers that are clueless and have such an urge to buy that they will pay ridiculous prices.

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By in United States,

$1300 for a golden statue minifigure? It's not even made of real gold and they charge the price as if it is. He is made of plastic but only with a golden paint covering. Go to Russia. Minifigures are sold without the "blind bags" there so anybody can find the minifigure he wants. It's crazy that capitalists charge waaay too high prices in America. I have bought that minifigure for the equivalent of $2! And he's not that great. The golden statue fits well in my museum but not much use elsewhere.

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By in United States,

Those darn AFOL's and collectors are spoiling the whole market by trying to buy every single minifigure. The lego company should make a rule against the sale of LEGO's to AFOL's.

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By in United States,

I guess they are trying to trick buyers into thinking they are buying a minifigure made of pure gold but actually he is just plastic with a fake "golden" paint covering.

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By in United States,

are there even 5000 dedicated collectors worldwide that are willing to spend even a 3 figure amount for one of these things? I agree with an above poster. These will be at $25 by the time series 11 launches. The comic can figures and Star Wars specials were of pop culture icons that have millions or billions of fans. Mr. Gold is a gold plated lego man, not in any way different than the recent vip keychain.

Lego does have to find a better way to do this. I like the plastic balls they put them in in Japan in order to use vending machines.

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By in United States,

You know, it's bad enough that Lego hides the fact that you don't know which minifig you are getting in the first place, so you have to buy more than you need(Or really want), but it is an altogether different beast now making people buy even more in hopes of finding a rare minifigure... Greedy greedy...

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By in Canada,

Craziness!!!!!!
I wanna buy an unopened box for sure.

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By in United States,

^ The deal must have fell through...

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By in United States,

The current high bidder at $900 has Zero feedback....

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By in United States,

This reminds me of Beanie Babies. I made a good fortune from those. There was one beanie in particular, I managed to get pretty much every single retailer in the country to sell me their stock before it went on the shelves. Beanies that kids wanted to buy for $5, I was paying the store $400 a piece for and then turning around and selling them on eBay the next day for $800. At one point a guy brought me $250,000 in CASH for 400 of them - I'd done a deal with the owner of a chain of 80 stores and bought his direct from his warehouse.

It got even crazier than that though in the end. One guy invited me to his house and it turned out he was a delivery driver who picked up the beanies from the port off the boat from China and took them to the distribution center. He had stopped his truck en route and offloaded a couple of full pallets into a friend's van. People were getting that crazy that they were committing crimes to get them.

In the end Ty themselves called me up and told me I was "Enemy #1" on their blacklist and tried to buy me out to kill the secondary market.

It's all just capitalism though. There's a lot of bitter people on this thread. People need to realize they can't have everything they want in life. And like the beanie babies, these minifigs are just bits of plastic. They are fun to collect at $3 a piece, but don't sweat you don't have the gold one. It's just going to sit on your desk and do nothing. Do you want to spend $1000 on that, just for the sake of completeness?

It's possible it might be a good investment though. I bought the Millennium Falcon in a 50% sale for $250 and now that thing is worth over $2500. Lego seems to be the new collectible, and I don't see it being a fad like beanies.

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By in Hungary,

@101ThePolybagCollector101 wrote "This is ment to be a fair game" about release dates. Don't worry: we had 1 box of s10 / big SPARs. Sold all, but still not every hungarian people rushing around with full s10 series. And it was expensive like +28% price, so better worth to wait until May to build armies. LEGO chooses 1 country for every series, I think to make hype. (Worked!) About fair things: We have a LEGO factory in country, but I have/had to buy all polybags + Team GB from the UK, US or Germany. Don't even expect LEGO to be fair, it's a profit making company and they do it very well. Peace.

As I see about the series, it's too fast and some figs too rare already (2 from 60?!) so kids gave up to collect them and our TESCOs gave up to sold it after s5, so too hard to collect a full serie. Some little shops open it and try to sell that way. Of course none need some figs, so they can't sell it for 1-2 years. But Friends collectible solds well, kids like that.

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By in Portugal,

Hello. I am trying to do something about that. Please check my Fb page:

LEGO: Please put a Mr.Gold in each box of 60

HERE: https://www.facebook.com/MrGold60

If you consider this post as spam or something like, please delete and accept my excuses.

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By in Netherlands,

The problem is that this ain't a service to the fans. I collected Gentle Giant Star Wars Busts and ordered the Boba Fett bust through propper channels. Little did I know that the wholesaler wanted one for himself and kept mine. So I had to buy it for a pretty unfair price. I don't need to do that but I still did it. To keep my collection complete.

I do have some stuff in my attic meant to be an investment. So in that regard I am as evil as someone buying beanie babies and calling people that complain about stuff like this bitter.

On the other hand, if a little kid comes by and wants a collectable, the kid will get it cheap. Simple as that. If you yourself do not have the heart to be a reasonable and fair collector then don't expect something back.

Nonetheless: I do hate the second hand market in most cases. Simply because they are there to make a quick buck. That's not what bothers me the most. It's the attitude. The complete lack of respect that these people have for collectors that do actually love a product.

I don't think that Lego is evil but it does make it less fun for me at the moment. I already have the 16 normal figures (which are awesome) (they are sold in small boxes of 30 figures and it's pretty hard to get a full series). And I guess I want Mr Gold too. If I don't get one I hope it falls into the hands of a young collector.

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By in United States,

Collectibility only works to a point. First, the "blind bag" option is the only way to sell such a small item and be useful for retailers. It's the only way to balance the varying cost/desirability with a low per unit price. Lego wants to price them at $3 but needs to sell $50-$100 at ONCE to make the product profitable. Otherwise, Lego would have to split the sets in half and charge $30 for each half... Then people would complain about paying $25 extra dollars for ones they don't want. Lots of kids wouldn't get ANY because $3 each is "pocket money" and $30 is "Birthday" money.

I've done the CCG thing since the beginning, the company needs each buyer to get say 47 packs (tossing numbers out) of each set to make their margin. But the first rule has to be how do I get PLAYERS to buy 47 packs? Because players appreciate the other 14 non-rare cards. PLAYERS keep my game going. Collectors in that market almost killed it. Because they HOARD your product and inflate the street price. Then kids STOP PLAYING your game... Then collectors see the low prices and stop hoarding product.. Then your SOLD product is taking sales from the NEW PRODUCT that keeps the lights on. Super exclusives work, but you have to pay attention that it goes FIRST to the group that spends the most.

For the Gold miniguy AFOL's are clearly the target market got a Gold plated little Dude. What Lego hasn't really done is build a community to TRADE the CMFs. And help players out. Unlike the CCG world there are not enough third party places to trade versus buy the CMFs and they probably wouldn't be kid friendly anyway... Kids don't understand "trading" between things that are "kind of" the same.

The aftermarket value of sets on eBay is OK. Lego gives NORMAL sets a year or two run, with the price posted for everybody on their website. If you came 3years late... Lego can't sell them all the time as its not practical. Of course if a set hits $1000+ when it was $100 to start, Lego can ALWAYS sell MORE of them!! The CFM gold dude breaks that because he is ALREADY $999 and NOT FOR SALE yet. So now they are just poking at us. When the Series 1 zombie hits $50 they will just make ANOTHER zombie slight different so the $97 extra bucks go to THEM.

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By in Romania,

@mabhatter: "What Lego hasn't really done is build a community to TRADE the CMFs. And help players out. "
That's why I was disappointed that Project SWAPFIG from Kickstarter hasn't achieved it's goal. It would have been so great to trade and sell minifigs at a community level and not having to pay huge amounts of $ for wanted minifigs on ebay or such. It only needed 3000$ for the creation and maintenance of the site. :(

As some have pointed out, I too believe that a redeemable code on the booklet of every minifigure bag (winner getting the exclusive MR. Gold) would have been much better for the sales of Series 10 and for the fairness of finding 1/5000 exclusive Minifigure, instead of being able to feel for them.

I might as well give up hope of finding a Mr. Gold under these marketing schemes, just like I will never have a gold C-3PO.

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By in United States,

I really dont mind that LEGO did this. Its a brilliant marketing scheme by them to have people searching high and low for this elusive Mr. Gold figure. But to be totally honest, I think the Mr. Gold figure sucks! Its not as impressive as any other minifigure that has been released and is merely interesting because its rare.

I will look for Mr. Gold but not because I want to find him but because I will be searching for the figures I am interested in and if I happen to stumble on a Mr. Gold, I will sell him. As much as it would be nice to have a rare figure, selling a lame Mr. Gold would pay for a TON of really great sets that I would actually enjoy.

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By in United States,

I found one yesterday at a Toys R us in GA. Now that i have it, Im not sure what to do. Of course i would love to make money on it, isn't that why we collect? turn 3 buck into 1,200? who wouldn't? They are out there, feel for the crystal in the staff, the staff is in three pieces. and it is in a clear bag inside the foil bag, so its hard to feel through. Mine is 4838/5000.

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By in United States,

If that's really what it looks like it's awfully ugly

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By in United States,

Why is everyone saying its an ugly figure I like mine very much!

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By in United States,

hey thats not true about i hust got two and i am a collector

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By in United States,

just*

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By in United States,

We looked through 2 boxes for our son. We did get the series 10 set completed except for Mr. Gold. He just wants it for his collection and doesn't understand that when it's limited it will sell for a bunch of money on ebay. I showed him ebay just a bit ago and I think he finally realizes that he won't be getting it that way! I ordered 5 extra packs from lego.com. We received them today, but we got 4 painters and the roman general....so no luck there! We will keep searching as we come across boxes, the only problem is around here we don't have a lot of retailers for them. Wish us luck!
As a mom I'm not happy with lego for doing this, kids collect these too and they don't understand that it's all about money.

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By in United Kingdom,

It would of been nice if lego had done Mr Gold differently. They should of had a normal high frequency version of Mr Gold that felt exactly the same as him. This would have discouraged employees of shops going through all their boxes as they would have to purchase everyone that felt like Mr Gold in order to try and find him. Granted this may mean the standard figure would be harder to find due to people buying them up but it would still be more of a discourage meant as you may have to spend loads buy x amount of packets that felt like Mr Gold before actually finding him.

Going by peoples estimates of boxes that contain Mr Gold, around every 46, that would make 276 figures that could be Mr Gold if there were 6 normal ones per box.

Just thought id contribute to the "scandal".

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