Mr. Gold is down under

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Mr. Gold has been found in New Zealand, and was put on the market and sold already for the ridiculous sum of NZ$750 (£410 / US$640). (Thanks Arch for the news).

It's interesting to note that the auction description states "Have noticed a small scratch on torso. Came out of the package like this, could have been caused by other parts moving around" which is not the first time such imperfections have been noted.

It's therefore worth reminding ourselves before going to ridiculous lengths to find one, that these are cheap Chinese-made minifigs and you are likely to be disappointed with its quality if you do manage to find one.

I've recently heard of more instances of Goldgate bringing out the worst in people:

- A Toys R Us in the USA has "warned the customers all of their packets have been checked for Mr. Gold before they made it to the floor."

- Someone bought seven whole cases from their local WalMart, rummaged through them at home, failed to find a Mr. Gold, and then took them all back for refund.

 

I can only hope that someone senior in LEGO reads about this sort of behaviour, and asks whether it's something they want their brand to be associated with, and then thinks very carefully before pulling a stunt like this again.

There would have been so many better ways to have done it without causing upset and frustration among loyal fans and customers.

- Someone suggested that 'golden tickets' should have been added randomly to packets which would have been impossible to feel for, which you then sent away to get Mr. Gold.

- Andrew emailed to say "LEGO should just have made it possible for people to buy them like the MiYu stones my sister collected. There are rare stones, and when you make a picture of your collection (maybe with yourself) then you were able to buy one of the rare stones."

I quite like the latter idea: send LEGO a picture of your collection of, say, 100+ CMFs and they send you a Mr Gold as a reward for being a loyal customer and dedicated collector.

Any other thoughts on the matter?

For the record, personally I am not fussed about getting one, but I know a lot of you are so I'm using these articles as a means of highlighting the issues Goldgate has caused and to provide a way for you to vent your frustration and anger!

66 comments on this article

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By in United Kingdom,

Even if the gold figure was one of the sixteen of the series, people would still be feeling through the packets for that particular figure. So I guess the best way is the golden ticket method, it's success has already been proven.

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By in United Kingdom,

> ridiculous sum of NZ$750 (£410 / US$640)

Is that ridiculous because it is so expensive, or so cheap compared to others?

Have Lego really screwed up? They may annoy their fans, but I bet people will still buy those packets that have been rummaged through at home on the off-chance that they contain Mr Gold, ignorant that they have been rummaged through. In that sense, Lego have made a good decision, as the series will sell. What are the loyal fans going to do as a backlash as a result of it? Stop buying Lego? Stop buying CMF?

There will always be kids (and parents / adults) new to collecting CMF. For every one dropping out, another one will come along.

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By in United States,

I like the listed "worse in people" comments, although I think you should add that some people have found multiples and are STILL SEARCHING for more! I mean, if your lucky enough to find ONE you should be satisfied, but people have found 2 and then continue to search for more.

The second idea of rewarding loyal customers would be perfect. I have all series 1-8 displayed on my entertainment stand, and am awaiting to get a case for series 9 to display, and haven't finished series 10, but the spot is ready for them to be put on display.

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By in United Kingdom,

" A Toys R Us in the USA has "warned the customers all of their packets have been checked for Mr. Gold before they made it to the floor."

Huh? So are they saying that staff have first dibs? Because the other way to read that is 'Don't bother buying any Series 10 minifigs from us, because we've made sure that you won't find a Mr Gold here.'

Sounds like they're shooting themselves in the foot.

I know there's some fairly strong feeling on Brickset that the whole 'Mr Gold' thing was a bad idea / has been badly handled, but is that feeling replicated elsewhere? I'm only a member of one other forum, and I don't spend much time there, so most of my Lego news is from here.

Also, how are Series 10 sales doing in comparison with previous collections? Has Mr Gold prompted an uplift? Because if it has, then I suspect that the TLG head honchos will live with any amount of moaning and groaning if it's putting cash in the bank.

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By in United Kingdom,

I can't get over the idea of buying a case or 7, rummaging through, and taking them back! The thing that amazes me is that the shop allows them to. I suppose if they do it quickly enough they can get in within the standard return time, so it is technically legitimate but that hardly makes it fair does it?
If I worked at the shop I'd be trying to find some technical loophole to refuse the refund. It would be such sweet poetic justice to leave them holding the packs, spluttering that it's not fair, with everyone looking on knowing that actually failing to apply the rules has in this instance actually made things fairer because the rules were being abused!

Anyone who does that, can I publicly state you should be ashamed! Disgraceful behaviour! And for the sake of a child's toy!
Actually, what's the difference between this and stealing candy from a baby?

Now, can someone help me down off my soapbox... I'm scared of heights... ;)
(...and have also just remembered the time time when I was 15 that I bought a water pistol from Argos on a Friday night, and then tried to dry it out and returned it on the Monday. Oops! Egg on my face!)

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By in United Kingdom,

Showing off how many figures you have shouldn't be a factor in receiving an exclusive figure as collections are often based on spending power more than anything. Loyal customers get rewarded in other ways throughout the year so there is no need to make this restricting to the same group of people.

I guess the original idea of Mr Gold was to generate more sales and to introduce new kids to the brand in the hope of picking out a rare figure. This opportunity has been taken away from most kids as most boxes have been sorted through already. My boy said he would love to have a gold figure but I know the chances of that happening are very very slim. I will still purchase the odd pack for the standard figure but if the prize had been a ticket insert then I would fancy my chances more and probably purchase a few extra with the shopping each week.

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By in Switzerland,

Well, maybe Lego made mistake with Mr. gold. My friend was passionately collecting all mini figures, but series 10 will be his last because there is no reason for him to collect all figures if he don't have them all. And without mr. gold, he thinks that he has no reason to search for all figures.
If that approach becomes more often, then Lego's mini figures series could get in trouble.
Whole idea was to push folks to buy more in order to find Mr. gold but with such unethical behavior there is no chance for average Joe to find it.

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By in United Kingdom,

I like the idea of the golden ticket - then Mr Gold will be a real bonus prize if you're lucky enough to win rather than just a hard to find minifigure. It would also make it fairer across the board so that anyone can find one, not just those lucky enough to have first access to new boxes (what are the odds of finding one a few weeks after they've been released and a few hundred have felt up every bag?) Unfortunately, I can't see this stopping them going for ridiculous amounts on the after market.

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By in United Kingdom,

- A Toys R Us in the USA has "warned the customers all of their packets have been checked for Mr. Gold before they made it to the floor."

What's the warning? Not to be disappointed if they can't find one or that they've already been rifled through so not to bother even looking? Strange.

A golden ticket would have been a much easier idea. As would have boosted sales in hope that your next packet would have one, and prevented returns as you'd need to open them to find out.

Alternatively they could have made Mr. Gold (in pearl gold) one of the regular 16 (maybe 6 out of 60) then had a limited run of chrome versions. Granted people would have ended up with an army of Mr. Golds whilst searching, but would boost sales whilst preventing returns.

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By in United Kingdom,

@CCC

Recruiting new FOLs costs TLG more than retaining existing ones. So replacing old with new is a margin-shrinking proposition.

I doubt that TLG is complacent about customer loss. The trouble is that TLG may indeed see an uplift in CMF sales in the near term only for it to fall off permanently as fans become disillusioned. But by the time that happens, the TLG execs responsible for Goldgate will be long gone with glowing CVs and fat commissions in their pockets.

And no, I'm not bitter. I'm not a completist: I collect CMFs and other minifigs by theme, specifically fantasy/castle and wouldn't include Mr Gold in my display collection even if I had one.

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By in United Kingdom,

I completely agree with the idea that a 'golden ticket' would have been the simplest (and fairest) way of doing the promotion.

What I can't understand is why they'd release a figure that was distinct from the rest of the series, and thus 'feelable'.

Wouldn't it have made more sense if they'd just picked one of the 16, and 'gold plated' 5000 of them? That way, you might know you've got fig X by feeling it, but you'd have to open the packet (thus stopping the returns of unwanted figs) to find out if it was a 'regular' or a 'limited edition'.

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By in Sweden,

They should have stopped those CMF a couple of series ago...

and @Huw. I am sure Lego reads what it says here!

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By in United Kingdom,

The send a picture in wouldnt work as a person with 100+ could simply take lots of pics of the same figs in different positions and get neighbours etc to all send for one. The best solution surely would be to simply annouce a new figure and sell it from Lego.com If they sold them for £20 collectors would buy them and no-one on ebay could charge much more. Good profits for Lego. Then as has also been suggested have tickets in the packets, maybe even have the actual sheet with the unique number on that you get, which is the same shape and size as the general sheet so no-one could feel, then you would get a minifig and potentially a free Gold one. Then any child or adult could say.... ill try to find one with luck alone and if all else fails buy one for £20. Some people would then say im not spending £20 on a £2 minifig and that would be that.

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By in United Kingdom,

To add to that list - the staff member in the UK (I'm guessing WH Smiths) who let their mate feel through 15 boxes of Series 10 a week before they went on sale.

The chromed version of a standard s10 wouldn't work as people would just buy any they found - you could buy an awful lot of them before finding a MR Golld and it would still be worth it. It would also have the negative impact of removing all of those figures from the retail boxes.

The golden ticket replacing the standard insert is the perfect idea and I'm not sure why LEGO didn't do this in the first place.

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By in United Kingdom,

@Zander - there is also a natural progression due to time. Kids collecting CMFs grow out of it. Other kids that were only just born in 2010 will soon start collecting them when they see them at the tills in WHS and other stores. Parents also get into collecting lego when their kids become old enough to start having it bought for them, so again, new collectors due to time progression.

The CMF are marketed in a very different way to usual sets.

@supersympa - They should have stopped those CMF a couple of series ago...
Why? People still like them, they sell well, and no doubt lego make money. They are a great way to collect new armies, minifig parts for customs, etc. as well as collecting series if you are into that.

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By in United Kingdom,

To me, this isn't just about Mr Gold. Rather, TLG should just stop with the whole blind-bag thing. It isn't ethical to make kids hand over their pocket money when they don't know what they're buying. LEGO was always better than that: when I was a lad I'd pay for LEGO because the product itself was good, rather than because of dirty marketing tricks. And as an AFOL, I would buy a *lot* more CMFs if they came in transparent bags, because I just don't have the time to go bag-fondling at my local store. In my view, TLG is damaging the LEGO brand by following this pathetic marketing strategy. It is bad for the customers and bad for business.

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By in United Kingdom,

@Lego34s - "The best solution surely would be to simply annouce a new figure and sell it from Lego.com If they sold them for £20 collectors would buy them and no-one on ebay could charge much more. Good profits for Lego."

There would be outrage that Lego were making an exclusive figure and trying to flog it for £20. It would be seen as cynical marketing of an otherwise £2 minifig. Minifigs like TC-14 were only worth £4.99 according to lego. There would also be the minecraft effect - resellers would purchase all they could, and the resale value is greater than the lego RRP. Or they make loads of them and it is no longer exclusive.

I also don't think they are rewarding loyalty here. The idea of this is luck. The idea should be that anyone can "win" one - whether you buy one pack or 100 packs, each pack should have the same chance.

If you want to be rewarded for loyalty, buy direct from lego.com / lego stores and collect VIP points.

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By in United Kingdom,

@kramii - " It isn't ethical to make kids hand over their pocket money when they don't know what they're buying. "

They are buying a mystery fig. Some kids like the mystery and surprise when opening them. If you want to know what you are getting, then buy a regular lego set. If the packets were clear, then you can expect all the sought after ones to disappear even quicker. Feeling is a problem (or bonus depending on your viewpoint). Better blind packaging would be better than see-through packaging in my opinion.

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By in Australia,

I like the idea of finding a golden ticket. I think the idea of taking a photo of your collection, sending it off to Lego and the first 5000 entries received are sent a Mr Gold. Too predictable now because alot of people I know feel the packs. All Mr Gold will be found too quickly.

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By in New Zealand,

Is there any chance Lego could release Mr Gold in a polybag at some stage after series 10 has had its run? Or have they specifically said somewhere that he will only ever be released as part of series 10? Seems to me once all the fuss has died down and, say, series 11 is in stores (if they haven't expressly said he will never be released in any other fashion) they could do a lot worse than releasing him that way to satisfy the consumer demand. I understand completists would still want both the original and the polybag in that case, but for the people who just want the figure that would be ok.

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By in United Kingdom,

I agree with you there Huw
The latter suggestion is a great idea

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By in United Kingdom,

^^ I'd really hope not. Screwing up (with two big ifs - if they acknowledge they have screwed up, and if they believe they have screwed up) once is bad, re-releasing an exclusive figure to the masses would be even worse.

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By in United States,

Man, all the comments about searching for Mr. Gold in horrible ways makes me have second thoughts. I had no clue however that some Toys R Us's have announced that they have already checked each box before they hit the floor. That's ridiculous, that's not good for business, and it will hurt Toys R Us. I agree with Huw all the way, inserting a ticket with a special code to email Lego to get your Mr. Gold. What really stunned me the most is the it is made of cheap Chinese plastics. Lego might be really hurting a lot of people and even there business! Now I have NO intention to search for a Mr. Gold.

Now I don't agree they should have stopped the line of CMF, I think it's great for kids to keep the collection going. You could build army's and get cool exclusive pieces!

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By in Germany,

And what's the difference between selling a rare gold chromed minifigure and selling a rare golden ticket? It would still fetch huge prices on ebay just as Mr. Gold does now.
The solution is simply a code on the leaflet of every bag without knowing it's a winner until you check the code on the web. That way once the code has been verified you could not sell it to someone else and only redeem it yourself. Wouldn't that be better?

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By in United States,

I still think this is a great plan for lego making money and I for one will find one (hopefully) and mine will never go up on ebay.

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By in Canada,

Greed bringing the worst out of people...who would have guessed.

I too hope Lego realizes the negativity this brings on them and does not do his again. If they really wanted to reward fans of Lego they should have randomly drawn VIP numbers and offered the Mr Gold for a small fee.

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By in Belgium,

@kramii

Blind bags are nothing new. Just look at Panini stickers or any trading card packets, it's the same deal and probably even worse since you can't feel cards or stickers.

CMFs are among the best of blind bags, except when you include something like Mr. Gold. Since the bags are "feel-able", some people (or even store personnel) are going to hunt down Mr. Gold packs and try to resell them for 10 jillion bucks on eBay because of its rarity. The golden ticket thing would have been a much better idea because it is actually random.

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By in United Kingdom,

@CCC:

To clarify, I don't object to the *collectable* nature of CMFs. However, even without duplicates, a full set of figs costs £32, which is a lot of money for many children. For this reason, it isn't fair that collectors (especially the children) have to pay for extra figures that they really don't want.

I get what you mean about surprise, but that only works for children who will buy only a few figures. For true collectors, all but the first few packets are likely to elicit disappointment rather than anything else.

Obviously, if the packets were transparent, then the figs would have to be made in the equal quantities. That way you could get all the characters / special parts you need, but without wasting money on the ones you don't want.

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By in United Kingdom,

^ Not everyone collects all of the figures though. If packets were see through, all the army builders would go instantly, making it hard for the completists to get full sets.

The amount a full set costs doesn't really come into it. Lego is expensive. People will get swaps / duplicates / whatever. They are then for trading with others - just like football stickers, as noted above. There are enough places to get the ones you want on the secondary market. In fact, football stickers are a far worse "parent tax" than minifigs.

@R0Sch - that idea would be no real different to having a winning ticket in the pack. Once redeemed, you could just sell the minifig. It would also work, as it stops feeling. You'd have to open the packet to find out if you are a winner. Although I guess there is a slight difference - you couldn't open a pack in store to check if it was winning, then just toss it if it wasn't there. You'd have to register it first. So maybe slightly better.

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By in Puerto Rico,

Again, Lego should just make this figures available in limited edition sets.

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By in United Kingdom,

@ROSch - the difference isn't how much it would sell for afterwards, that's completely out of TLG's control except for determining quantities to try and regulate it.
The difference is that it would be impossible to find out you had a 'winning bag' without opening it. The problem is that it's possible to rifle through a box and pick out the one you wanted without having to buy the others, giving some people a hugely unfair advantage in finding one, and in not spending loads of money only to not find one.

And just to add, I'd hate the idea of a code to enter. When it's an in instant win, you should win instantly; a further stage that could result in failure would ruin the whole experience of opening the bag and finding out.
Also, having something tangible there and then is far better, so I'd favour a gold-plated version of one of the current figures. If you got a gold ticket and had to send off for the mini-figure I think that would ruin the experience too, though saying that a ticket that got you a trip round Legoland or the Lego factory would be pretty good!

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By in Canada,

I'm just sad that it's not even a figure I find all that appealing, and yet this whole thing has just sorta had the net effect of making me not care about Series X at all. I dunno why, it just sorta crushed the whole thing for me.

Although I do have to say I took great joy in pointing out to a guy that his daughter's Mr. Gold was crazy valuable [they had no idea] so they talked it out, took to the Bay and sold it for $850 bucks. I'm happy I helped at least one actual child benefit from this insane situation.

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By in United States,

@Andhe, I like your ideas!

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By in Australia,

I'd love the idea of sending in a photo of your collection, because it would mean I would get one! ;)

I collect all the series', but I am not fussed over finding Mr Gold: he is not part of the series, he's just a special figure on the side, who I am very unlikely to actually get.
It would be nice IF I was lucky enough to find him, just because of the rarity, but I am not at all going to be upset if I don't.
Maybe Australian store-owners (with there being no official brand stores) will be less savvy and less interested in this sort of promotion, which might give actual customers a legitimate chance... I would like to think there are some employees who will not be resorting to such drastic and unfair measures.

Just curious, (and this has probably been said somewhere...) but does anyone know if the Mr Gold figure *replaces* another figure in the box (so still making a total of 60), or if he is the 61st... if the latter, it should be easy to determine which boxes to look in, but I suspect the former. :D

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By in United Kingdom,

^ Mr Gold replaces one packet in a lucky box.

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By in United States,

The problem with the Golden Ticket idea is that the speculators would just buy tons of figures and then resell the non gold ticket bearers online. Then you probably would have to resort to Bricklink or whatnot to get the regular figures since stores would be all bought out.

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By in United States,

...if some TRU employees are already checking packets/boxes even before it hits the floor, does this mean other employees of retailers, such as Target and Walmart could be doing the same?...

...in which case, are chances much higher buying 16 packets from S@H?... and should we "inspect" each packet first upon receiving just to make sure S@H employees hasn't checked each packet before fulfilling each order?...

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By in United States,

The new LEGO Club magazine just came out and it has a full page ad for the new CMF which features Mr. Gold and encourages kids to look for him. That's just repulsive and it really sucks that LEGO would do this. I've already explained to my kids that it's basically impossible to get one of these and they shouldn't get their hopes up. Fortunately, they didn't like his look anyway. I'd be really irate if they did want it.

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By in United Kingdom,

Hey, the Mr Gold map page is up now! 9 have been found already, 2 in the UK damn! I really really want one, but I will never be able to afford the ridiculous prices on ebay. I just hope luck is on my side!

My cousin who works at Toys R Us said staff there were not allowed to go through boxes until they were out on the shelves, and even then he said he was the only one there who bothered! He got 2 paintball players, a trendsetter, and a medusa.

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By in United States,

Lego must have not watched Willy Wonka... I'm waiting for a S10 box to show up at Sotheby's - :-)

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By in United Kingdom,

I think Lego have dropped the ball on Mr Gold - the only way to really "make it fair" would have been to have an identical figure (top hat etc.) and replace one of those in a box with Mr Gold - that way, they are rare, but not too rare, and feeling the bags wouldn't have got you one as you can't feel the colour.

The price on the secondary market is difficult for TLG to control.

You never know - TLG might have gone "evil" - there might be some marketeer jumping up and down at the people buying the collectible mini figs just to get this gold one.

Will I be looking for him - not expressly, but I won't complain if I got one (though not for ebay)!

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By in Canada,

I'll admit that while looking through the figs, I completed the box to check for Mr. Gold (did not find one, either time).

I thought about it afterwards and figured that the initial excitement of finding him would fade pretty quickly. After that, he'd just be another fig. He'd sit up with my celebration Luke and Han form the DK books, and that would be it. Not a big deal.

The whole idea of the bags being unfair to begin with is a bit silly. From the company side of things, it's genius! Just notice how many other companies / brands have taken the idea and rolled with it: Mega Blocks, Palymobil, etc. For them it seems little effort and lots of gain. It is too bad that this has caused such animosity towards the company, or at least the process. The gold ticket idea seems good, but I'm sure the cost to the company (shipping it out to those who find, across the globe) would keep them from doing so.

In the end, I hope to find one, but I'm done spending the time looking. I'll grab a random bag from time to time and hope for the best...

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By in United States,

That is something people don't always remember. They are cheap plastic from China due to the printing and some of the molds used. You can tell there is a difference between them and other minifigures (non-CMF). With that said, all figures can have some sort of damage to them from feeling in a packet. But I think in this instance, the chroming actually picks up all of the surface scratches more easily, so then they become more noticeable. My TC-14s look really scratched up and they came straight from LEGO and are still in the packaging, so never been touched by a human. I think Mr. Gold will be the same way. YMMV with the surface quality.

I really wanted one until I saw the official photos in the wild. I don't particularly care for the chroming on figures. It is very unique and that is part of the appeal, but otherwise, I don't love the look. I liked the pearl gold version better, which means I would have liked if he was one of the original 16. They should have released Mr. Good and Evil along with Mr. Gold so there would be two top hat figures in one series. Similar to always feeling for the lady skirt piece and having to differentiate between them.

Either way, I won't go out of my way to find one. Especially at $600+ dollars (and that is cheap compared to what I've seen). Hmm, what other LEGO can I buy for $600...

Good luck to everyone finding one.

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By in United States,

@Polynices - I agree, as a parent it really sucks that LEGO put an ad for Mr. Gold in the LEGO Club magazine, when my kids realistically have zero chance of finding him in the wild. My kids study every single page in the Club magazine, and they of course noticed this ad. It is very likely that they wouldn't have noticed the advertising in the store or in the package, because once they have a minifig in their hands they care about the minifig and nothing else. However, the club advertisement is just going to result in a lot of disappointed kids.

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By in New Zealand,

+1 on Huws comments, Goldgate was a counterproductive idea, Lego have lost it lately.

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By in United Kingdom,

@voyanuitoa is that all the code does? Tell lego where people buy lego?

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By in United Kingdom,

I do want to get my hands on a Mr Gold if I can, as I have collected since Series 1 and would like to retain a truly 'complete' collection if I can.

Nevertheless, I completely agree with Huw on this, yet another blunder on the part of Lego this year. I find that they have been making a few questionable decisions lately.

So far this year, three themes have been seemingly inexplicably delayed for release in the UK, and now we have Mr Gold who is just causing problems and bringing out the worst in people. If Lego truly believed that most of the Mr Gold Minifigures would end up in the hands of children rather than adult collectors, they have another thing coming...

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By in United States,

How about coupons with unique codes or scratch off? LEGO will then ship to the person. This prevents gropers or people weighing packages from being able to find item without opening package. Limited minifigure will still drive sales of CMF. Something like that.

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By in United Kingdom,

I posted about the golden ticket in the Mr.Gold in the UK thread.

"2)I think it would have been a better idea if lego had just produced a gold leaflet and inserted that into the packets in a willy wonker style fashion.Whether this leaflet was then redeemable for a Mr.Gold or a trip round Lego, or whatever, would have negated the whole raiding/feeling of boxes.It would have been truly random then."

It would have avoided all of this.
I really hope Lego doesn't do this again.

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By in Switzerland,

LEGO should produce a second identical wave of Mr. Gold in a large amount and easy to aquire. So everybody who spent such astronomical prices would be truly screwed....

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By in United States,

I love the idea of having a minifig identical to Mr. Gold but in regular colors. This way you can't feel for him. Great thinking.

I also think that the paper with the code should be worth something. Maybe if you turn in the paper with a code (or enter the code at Lego.com) you get something from Lego. An exclusive set, gift card to Lego or something similar. This way at least the completists that are shelling out hundreds get a little something extra for redeeming the code.

I hope there are a bunch of them in the hands of children, using their imaginations to play with Mr. Gold rather than putting him up for bid.

Theoretically, does anyone see an issue if you find one, and sell it on eBay to use whatever you make on it to purchase more Lego? A $3 minifigure can quickly turn into a Death Star and Millenium Falcon for those collectors who can't afford the larger sets.

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By in United States,

I like the idea of sending in a picture of yourself and 100 minifigs, but anyone could take a picture off the internet. And does lego have the time to check thousands of pictures making sure there are 100? Maybe you could send in 100 of the little instruction things, and lego could weigh them, but a lot of people don't keep those.

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By in United States,

@jbiv33 I sorta like that idea of selling one for more legos. I certainly wish I could go back in time and get the 2007 MTT, the 2010 Imperial Flagship, the 2009 Tantive IV or the tan creator house from 6 or 7 years ago, those are all so expensive now, and I couldn't afford all of those at the time. There are only so many lego sets you can get in 1 year :(

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By in United States,

Wow, seven cases and no Mr. Gold, I wonder how even the distribution is. I only checked about 150 and stopped looking for him. Personally, I like the idea of the golden ticket to find him as well.

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By in Canada,

The Idea that You can feel for certain figures is not new. If you just casually buy a few packs when you see a box chances are you are only aver going to get the figures that are printed the most. All figures that are short printed have been felt for in the boxes and are gone.

I understand this and accept it as a fact. Now that it had been made harder to find and not guaranteed in every box people have become frantic. This is still not going to affect the casual collector or the Grandmother who buys a few for the little ones as treats. For the most part it is only the AFOL who really is angry at this. There will always be children who are disappointed that they are not able to have one, to that I say do you buy every LEGO product produced? LEGO is very good at spreading important characters throughout all sets in a product line. I am sure most of you have gone through this and had to explain that your child can not have every set produced and if you are one of the few who can afford to purchase all the sets produced than you can probably buy one off of eBay if you are not lucky enough to get one in the stores.

My suggestions - 1) if you feel this is a must have for your collection wait a few weeks, as with limited number sports cards, the first few go for high prices and then they will settle down to a sustainable level. I predict between $300-$400 and may go even lower if a lot of dealers place them all up at the same time.

2) for LEGO in the future, why not place 1 gold Parallel if of one of the 16 figures from that series in each box. There would be 16 chase figures that no one could feel for, it really would be luck of the draw. You could even make them different levels of rarity as you do with the regular figures in each box. You still get people to buy more, because lets face it this is all about making more money and not about a bonus for loyal customers.

I know not everyone out there is going to agree with me but it is just my thoughts on the matter. :)

Good luck to all in the search..

and for those who are wondering I usually buy 1 box from an online source, keep a set and sell off the others in a local flea market. For series 10 I have purchased 4 boxes, I am going to open 2 (Yes I would like a Mr. Gold as well) and sell the other packs in the flea market but I will make sure no one will be able to search the packs to give all the customers a chance to possibly get one without them being searched.

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By in Canada,

The golden ticket idea sounds great, myself I'm just going to happy with the rest of the series.

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By in Canada,

I like how you say "someone" bought 7 cases.....

Yes Mr Gold has brought the worse out even in me....

thanks LEGO...

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By in Australia,

why didn't Lego make them out of real 24k gold if it wanted a real market promo

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By in United Kingdom,

@covecollectable, good points, you should say that again... twice... ;)

I like @EveryBrick's idea - how to stop this gold rush? Devalue the currency!
It would be a nice kick in the teeth to the buyers that are exaggerating Mr Gold's worth, though it would also reward those who contributed by selling him early doors, so they'd be happy as Larry either way.
I've a suspicion he'll turn out to be not half as hard to find as it seems anyway. @CCC's point in the "It could be you" thread about even population distribution is more than fair; he'll turn up more in the parts of the world that sell Lego! As a lot of people are saying, just find a shop where the staff aren't likely to be AFOLs and hey presto, you're back in with a chance!

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By in United States,

I think the strategy of going to an area where few people are interested in such a thing is a good idea. I live in area where few teens/adults are interested in collecting Lego or Matchbox (I collect Matchbox, by the way). I was in my local Walmart and found the rare Matchbox 60th anniversary metallic red Routemaster bus on the front of the rack. So judging by that, I should be able to find this minifigure quite easily.

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By in United States,

In my opinion there is nothing remotely special about this figure, if it would have been part of the main 16 there would have been no muss and no fuss over him. He probably even costs less to make than the Medusa hair or the new seagull piece...

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By in Netherlands,

One for sale here in Holland going for silly money

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By in Australia,

@whosaking That would be SUPER easy to tell apart from the others - it'd weigh tonnes more.

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By in United States,

I have to ask again, what is it about China-made Legos that makes them "cheap?" I don't understand these complaints. I have seen no reports of China stuff being worse than any other Legos. Hypothetically, if I get a Mr. Gold (made in China), how would he be different that if Mr. Gold had been made anywhere else?

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By in United Kingdom,

I FOUND MR GOLD TODAY!!.. prepare for disappointment!..

As a Lego VIP and lifelong collector of Lego (a brand I have always associated with QUALITY) I am incredibly disappointed to have discovered the "golden ticket" of Lego yet it is factory damaged..

I have collected hundreds of Minifigures and Lego sets throughout my childhood and into adulthood and have enjoyed collecting every figure from every single Collectable Minifigure series since they began.

Since completing series 10 I have continued to purchase bags in order to try to find Mr Gold.. Well I cannot tell you how incredibly overjoyed (and shocked!) to report that this morning I managed to discover a Mr Gold!!
I think it is the closest feeling i have had to winning the Lego lottery.. I have registered the figure on the VIP map and printed my diploma which will be proudly displayed with our hundreds of Lego Minifigures..

However upon closer inspection (I have kept Mr Gold sealed in the bag he came in) there is a "burn" type mark on his face.. It is NOT a scratch or from "feeling" the bag as this came from a sealed box..

I cannot tell you how much I feel disheartened to be lucky enough to find Mr Gold only to find he is of poor quality! Surely Lego should have produced these in an environment where they could be easily checked for QC.

So my one request as an active Lego VIP and hopefully continued lifelong customer (not to mention those around me I have influenced!) I have asked Lego to supply us with (at least) a Mr Gold head, if not the Minifigure itself.

Ive attached a pic, as well as I can capture it but its worse than it looks..it looks like a shadow but its a sort of dark acid like burn :(

Poor show Lego, lets hope they can resolve!

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