SDCC minifig raffles 'were rigged'

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By all accounts, the antics of LEGO at SDCC were a shambles that have done nothing but bring the company into disrepute and cause disruption at the event itself.

The distribution of highly desirable minifigures in such small quantities causes frustration for those that that couldn't get to the event and also those who queued for hours to get a ticket only to find they didn't win one.

Now, to make matters worse, it's alleged that LEGO rigged the distribution of tickets, giving pre-determined winning tickets to kids. FBTB has run a story on this where you can read how it was allegedly done.

If this is true, it is shocking and unacceptable, and I hope LEGO considers how it handles such promotions in the future in light of these revelations. It may have been their attempt to prevent the scalpers from getting them but how would you feel if you weren't a scalper and you'd queued for hours to get a ticket only to find out later that you had no chance of winning?

I personally think now would be a good time to stop these promotions altogether, or make them less desirable. I'm not saying that as a collector, since I stopped collecting Super Heroes figures ages ago (because of promotions like this) but because they are damaging the brand and the company's reputation.

What's your view?

151 comments on this article

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By in Germany,

Wow, just wow.
Now I want an answer from Lego on this.
And I want further steps, as you said. No more impossible to get collectibles at cons.
I hope it turns out like you said.
This is just a huge red mark for Lego in my book.
They failed in marketing their Super Heroes line now.

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By in United Kingdom,

Lego should just stick to making these available for orders over £50 at the Lego Store or in Retail sets!!

Lego, I still want the Spider-Man and Black Suit Superman, so make them available to everyone and make it fair!!

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By in United States,

I agree that these special promotions should be stopped and reserved for purchases on their website. Having isolated promotions makes it almost impossible for the majority of collectors to acquire rare sets/minifigs.

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By in United States,

As I said in another post, the way they gave out the NY Yoda figs was perfect. It was a complete surprise to everyone so therefore nobody went there just to get one.

Everybody knows they give away stuff at SDCC so the hype builds for 12 months and a lot of people make the effort. You get a few happy people but a lot of disappointed people.

You will always get a lot of disappointed people but they key would be to manage that, limit it, limit the disruption for those who are not taking place (i.e. all those proper customers who had to be booted from the Lego booth and the nearby exhibitors) and most importantly make it as fair as possible.

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By in United Kingdom,

I would ask first, were these LEGO employees or marketing people hired by LEGO to run the convention stand?

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By in Netherlands,

I don't think that TLC is going to give a statment on this. Maybe, just maybe behind the scene @TLC there is a meeting that next year SDCC it must be diffrent or better organized. But that's it. (personal opinion)...

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By in United States,

Also, putting my Devil's Advocate hat on for a second, there is not a single piece of hard evidence about alleged rigging in that FBTB post on the subject. I say everyone should chill out for a while until something solid is known.

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By in United Kingdom,

My view is - Mr Gold's and SDCC exclusives for everyone!

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By in United Kingdom,

I must say, I do not mind exclusives one bit, as long as they are limited to around 1000, which leaves the prices at an achievable level. I do like the fact that some Minifigures are rarer than others however and would be sorry to see the end of exclusives altogether.

If this 'rigging' is indeed true, then I am appalled to hear about it, but I would wait for a little more definitive proof of these 'shady dealings'. It would be a terrible shame to see the reputation of LEGO being damaged by such goings on.

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By in Italy,

I don't like exclusives as well, even if I completely understand the logic behind it, but these looks like theories not facts.
Anyway, in case it's the reality, I honestly like the approach: better having minifigures in the hands of kids than resellers.

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By in United Kingdom,

In one hand I am glad it was rigged for kids, but that does not explain all the ebay listings. Sounds fishy to me.

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By in United States,

I'm not sure if we should jump to the conclusion that it was indeed rigged, however, I'm in agreement with CapnRex101. I think that exclusives are a good idea - but they have to be done right, and it seems that Lego is running these events very poorly.

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By in United Kingdom,

As if there wasn't enough bad feeling around this already. What an absolute disgrace!
At least they were rigging it in favour of kids, but that's not at all fair on the AFOLs who paid a lot to be at the SDCC, and unfortunately for TLG it's unfair towards the people who are most able to make a fuss!

I didn't imagine the outrage over all of this already, as loud as it was, would have any affect on TLG at all. But with these revelations I've a feeling there's something in it now. There's too much in it for TLG to just power on through like they do now, I'll be interested to see their response.

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By in United States,

Personally, I don'y see the big deal... What's the difference between giving out predetermines tickets, and drawing possibly the same ones a few days later? Assuming that no one knows the numbers, and they have to get a random anyways... or am I looking at this the wrong way?

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By in Australia,

if they want the figures to go to kids, all they have to do is say "first 500 (or whatever) kids get a minifig!
Simple. Noone wastes their time and kids get a special toy

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By in United Kingdom,

@Perfectlydark I just pictured a bunch of people cosplaying as kids XD

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By in United Kingdom,

I think people have to be careful about throwing accusations of 'rigging' around but from reading the fbtb report, I would hope that someone in TLG is investigating, and whether they make it public, or just change the system for raffles in the future, I would hope that there is never the opportunity for this sort of accusation again.

If they want to just give out to kids (do many kids go to these conventions?) then they should just restrict the age. And there's nothing to stop a parent sticking it on ebay, or selling it to someone in the convention who comes up offering $100 etc.

In my opinion, they should stick to selling the exclusives (eg the micro hobbiton) as I don't think the freebies are doing them any favours.

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By in Portugal,

Let's put it this way - Not all of us have the conditions to attend SDCC, and most of us also don't have the conditions to buy the figures on ebay/bricklink from resellers. Do we die because of that? No. I speak for myself when I say I don't waste a second thinking or regretting this. I have an awesome LEGO Collection with lots of cool minifigures (yes, stop talking like the exclusives are the only decent ones...) and I ENJOY IT. I enjoy what I have and don't cry over what I don't have. Sure I have been there, but trust me, it's not worth it.

Now let's see a few facts :

- Are LEGO giveaways at SDCC very but very badly organized?? Check!
- Is a good % of the figures going to non-LEGO enthusiasts but rather scalpers or people looking to get a bit of cash to pay for their expenses? Check!
- Are LEGO giveaways rigged to give the figures to pre-defined winners?? I am sorry but you need to get some sleep. No offense but you (and by you I mean everyone generally whining , not a single person) are just mad you didn't got one and now you're turning your crying into creative conspiracy theorizing. Seriously, use your skills for something more useful.

Sorry if my post looked a little to offensive, but I am honestly tired of all this subject and everything around it. It's like all LEGO is about now is exclusives, profit and exclusives again. There's no more passion about Exhibitions, MOC's, exchanging knowledge and whatsoever. Sure that the company isn't exactly helping at it, but dudes - you're feeding the fire they started so...

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By in United States,

For a bunch of people who supposedly love Lego, some of you are awfully quick to turn on them. Based on what? Some person's theory.

Also, even if it were true, OMG, Lego's giving free toys to kids! They must me stopped!

Give it a rest. Welcome to San Diego Comic Con, where toy companies give away free toys that you can't obtain. Get used to it. You can't have everything.

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By in United Kingdom,

Just to be clear, I am not accusing anyone of anything: I am reporting allegations made by others, hence copious use of quote marks and 'allegedly' in my article.

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By in New Zealand,

I must agree with CrockAlley here.
Maybe it was 'rigged' maybe it wasn't. But frankly, any rigging that essentially gives free Lego to kids and largely (but not always, granted) stops it going to people that aren't even interested in Lego so they can make some money off eBay is an OK rig in my books.

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By in United States,

the special minifigures just need to be a pre-release of the figure, meaning the exact same one will come out later in sets. That way the winner of the figs can say "i have a figure that most don't" but then later everyone can buy it.

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By in United States,

Agreed with CrockAlley. Aren't we supposed to be (mostly) adults here? No Spider-Woman Minifig for you? Oh well.

Granted, the perspective might be different for people who actually lined up to try and get the figs, but even in a purely fair raffle someone has to win and someone has to lose. Either way the figs are free!

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By in United Kingdom,

Lego are really starting to lose the plot where all this is concerned.every year at comi-com there are riots the VIP keying was very upsetting for a lot of fans then Mr Gold came along and really P***ed off everyone. I love my Lego I love collecting and Lego if your listening I would love a level playing field. Lego should released Mr gold to anyone who wants one and that would stop future scalppers. I have e-mailed them on this subject but they never listen.

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By in United States,

The answer is simple:

If you waited for HOURS in line to get a PLASTIC FIGURINE - then by all means it is time for you to reconsider your priorities in life. Anyone who is that willing to whore themselves out for something that worthless has MUCH bigger problems than not completing their collection. Take that energy and time and spend it with your family, get some exercise, volunteer for charity - do something, ANYTHING - just stop being obsessive losers.

Yes - this post was intended to offend - many people on this site really really need to rethink their priorities.

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By in Hungary,

It sounds like in Friends where Monica made candies and soon a huge crowd were waiting in front of her door demanding for more candies. So they spoiled all the fun the candy should have represent. If I were lego I would have said to the crowd:
"People, these freebies should have been fun to collect. With such a crowd you spoiled everything!. So NOONE gets ANYTHING! Now you can go home, shame on you! Maybe next year, you learn how to behave!"
In a normal word, one customer or two just step by in the stall, only a few in an hour.

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By in United States,

Doesn't surprise me. Just look at how Lego run the monthly mini-build in store. They have parents and kids line up for hours to attract attention. And there are times they ran out of kits after customers waited for a long time. Not to mention if kids got hurt while waiting in line, they are liable. A simple solution is to hand out numbers. But doing so, you don't get a big crowd in front of the store. Obviously they know what they are doing.

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By in United Kingdom,

To give a more detailed response rather than what I said earlier I don't have a problem with limited edition items but I think it's sensible that there be enough of said item that the markup in the reseller market is no more than double the original price.

I think this goes even for non-limited edition items too but that are sought after, to me the fact that things like Cafe Corner and Green Grocer go for £400 which is what, 3x - 4x their original price is pretty telling that there was a clear market for a re-release of these sets.

The same goes for Mr Gold, if it's selling for $500 on eBay then something is wrong. It's no longer about a toy or a collectable item but entirely about creating a condition where people out to make money can do so and that's great for them but last I checked Lego is meant to be a toy company, and a mini-figure that fetches that much is no longer a toy but effectively a piece of artwork.

There's also a bigger danger though in much the same way that industries such as music and movies saw mass piracy of their products with the advent of the internet because they'd been operating price fixing cartels for years artificially inflating the price of their products to the fact that designer brands like Armani, Gucci and so forth have a massive problem with counterfeit fakes there's a big danger that Lego will go the same way. How long before a Chinese shop starts producing fakes of expensive rare sets but without the quality/safety standards such that some kid gets poisoned or hurt? Even if that doesn't happen what if it starts cutting into Lego's profits as counterfeit items replace real ones in shops such that Lego loses some of it's share of the profits? Neither would directly be Lego's fault but it's their reputation and bottom line that's going to take the hit.

Effectively Lego should stick to what it's good at - being a toy company, and not keep trying to be an art shop because that just annoys many of it's core audience. I think artificial scarcity is a road fraught with dangers and whilst companies when they encounter it get carried away and reap in the profits and media coverage at first, it never ends well long term. If Lego keeps it up it'll eventually find itself fighting an ever growing number of ever more convincing counterfeits and fighting PR battles over responsibility for problems. Artificial scarcity never ends well because someone always finds a way to open the floodgates and if it's your product then that better be you or you can wave goodbye to an unhealthy chunk of profit to lose.

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By in United Kingdom,

@serviceburo - You do have a point, but do you realise you just posted that on a thread on a website run by adult fans of Lego for other fans Lego of any age which you are a signed up member of? You've passed quite a lot of "Grow up! Sort out your life and your priorities! You're a loser!" warning signs just to get this far yourself. ;)

Are a proportionately thought out and responsible life and a Lego collecting habit mutually exclusive? I sure hope not!

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By in United Kingdom,

Xefan
i have seen cafe corners for more then £700 if they ever sold i don't know but i wish i had the cafe corner and market street but luckily i have the green grocer it's a great set and one of my favourive sets

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By in Netherlands,

Doesn't surprise me. Lego has been doing strange things for a while. And not only in san diego. Prices in europe with 10 euro differences per set. Dealers getting multiple mr. golds and collectors non. Even promobags that are for sale first in easton europe and then a month later they come out with a promo somewhere else (that means they have probably been taken from a factory). So this problem could be just another one in line of problems with the lego company, especially with the promo department.

P.s.
It's not bad they want to give them to kids. But they should level both makets (kids and adults) when they give things away. Lego is for kids, but the adult fans ARE the people who spent big amounts of money and this only making them mad and disappointed at the lego company.

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By in United Kingdom,

I'm surprised this headline is even reported on Brickset's front page. The support for these "allegations" is thin to nonexistent. The author has a theory how Lego _might have rigged_ the raffle, but no objective data or indication that Lego did so (other than a "fishy" feeling among those who didn't win - go figure).

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By in United Kingdom,

I won't believe this rigging theory unless there's solid proof that comes along. I appreciate these exclusive figures are quite cool and awesome, but I won't lose sleep over them and doubt that Lego would rig them (all the listings on Ebay! Unless those resellers bought them off the kids who won them). IMO Lego should just increase their promotions every few months or so, e.g "Spend £50 and get a FREE Spider-Man figure!", and everyone will be happy. These exclusives are meant to be fun souvenirs and collectibles, but instead turn into something else entirely.

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By in United Kingdom,

@Xefan - Discontinued modular buildings selling for £400 doesn't tell TLG they're ripe for re-release. The prices are pretty accurate for how much it costs to source the bricks - I just did that for the Green Grocer and enough of the bricks are rare enough to make £400 a relatively fair price. (Try finding 56 sand green 1x2 bricks with a groove! Gold dust!)
Where only a small number of sets are available it only takes a small number of buyers to create an inflated price. And that price does not in any way show that demand is high enough to re-release a set, with all the assembly, packaging and distribution that would be involved. I'd trust TLG on this one, that they know their overall sales figures and that when they retire a set they know what they are doing.

And as much as I think TLG needs to rethink how they run these promotions, the vast majority of their products are not artificially scare at all, this is hardly a dent on their overall trade.

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By in United States,

I would rather have prerelease minis distributed in special packaging. NYCC superman is a prime example. Collectors pay top dollar for an easily attainable figure. I hope they restructure their system.

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By in United States,

I hope this is true. I hope they rigged it, and I hope they did a really good job rigging it too. I hope that the vast majority of figs went to kids and not scalpers, or even AFOLs. LEGO is for kids. I’m an adult, and I love it too, but it is designed for kids and they are the target audience.

It is frustrating that there are figures that I really want and will probably never get, but the fact that life is not fair is something I learned as an adult. The world is unfair, and because it will always be unfair I applaud TLG for creating a bias that favors the children. I would expect nothing less from the world’s best toy company.

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By in United Kingdom,

@zipsforbananas I think you're missing the point, pricing of a set in the resale market is determined entirely by supply and demand and so when the price increases it means there is plenty of demand but not enough supply. The cost of finding bricks now has little relevance as their cost is similarly set by supply and demand and if those bricks are unique or fairly unique to a set then that simply further says there is plenty of demand but not enough supply.

So there is going to be a point at which the cost of a set is high enough due to plenty of demand but lack of supply such that it would be cost effective for Lego to manufacture that set once more and whilst a set such as #8038 (Battle of Endor) can be picked up for as little as 1.2x it's original retail price might not yet be worth re-issuing because the price implies there isn't a large enough supply shortage in the secondary market relative to demand to justify re-release it's a different story when a set is fetching 4x it's original price - that's an awful lot of demand.

You can find older sets, way older than Cafe Corner and Green Grocer with way rarer parts in this day and age with price multipliers that would be wiped out by inflation over the period between then and now alone for the simple fact that there just isn't enough demand for them relative to the supply. Those sets most definitely would not be worth re-releasing despite their rarity and age.

This is why it's only the current price sets go for relative to the original price they were selling for that really matters because it's that that tells us how in demand a set is now and hence whether it's ripe for re-release. At the multipliers Green Grocer and Cafe Corner are selling at then they most definitely are some of the best candidates (as well as #10179 the UCS MF) for re-release precisely because they are some of the most in demand and shortest supply sets out there as determined by the price they actually sell at.

Or to put it simply, if there was no real demand for Cafe Corner and Green Grocer to justify re-release then the price would be much closer to the original price, the sets would be selling for a mere £150 and there would be grooved sand green 1x2s and normal sand green 1x8s aplenty and the cost of them would be pennies. That's not the case, which highlights the massive demand.

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By in United Kingdom,

@labrat I think the whole "Lego is designed for kids" thing is a bit daft. You really think many kids care about Lego Architecture? about Tower Bridge and the Sydney Opera House?

Lego is for everyone and their product range reflects that.

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By in United States,

Just to help add an extra side to the story here regarding exclusives, it's not always LEGO that is behind these offerings. I attended a Q&A with LEGO representatives at Brick Fiesta this year and it was discussed how oft times it is the licensees that come to LEGO with interests in certain themes or sets being made (an example was the Lone Ranger theme). I personally asked if this kind of interaction applied to sets or exclusives at events like Comic-Con and the like and was answered that it can be as well.

The point is, we don't know all the time for sure how these exclusives are set up, but it is just as likely Marvel and Warner Bros are going to LEGO and saying "We want you to make X number of minifigs from (insert relevant show/movie here) and give them out at (important event)".

This thought does not sort out the supposed "rigging" in the distribution, but it some to think about before we all decry LEGO's manner making of exclusives.

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By in Australia,

... Meh... So what? I mean, sure, if you're a die-hard collector it's a bit of a kick in the balls, but as someone who already had a near zero chance of getting any of these minifigs, making that chance even smaller isn't even noticeable. And this is coming from someone who would LOVE to have the SDCC exclusive superheroes.

I think some of us just need to sit back and re-remember what AFOL actually stands for, because I'm not seeing a lot of adult-level reactions to this (not even confirmed yet) news. I'm seeing a lot of crying that a child didn't get the toy they wanted... We're all still remembering that part, right? That we are talking about toys?

And here's my other question: How many people who own these figs are gonna actually play with them? Maybe I'm an anomaly, but I actually play with my LEGO. I don't want a Green Arrow or a Shazam so I can stick them in a glass case! I want them so they can join the LEGO Justice League and defend the rest of my LEGO City from baddies! So I couldn't blame LEGO for trying to ensure the toys are going to be used for their intended purpose.

Now, I'm not going into the Forced Artificial Scarcity side of this argument, that's a whole other argument for another time. I'm just saying that right now we should all just step back, take a deep breath, and calm the heck down.

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By in Netherlands,

At Xefan, I bought all the modular houses when they were new and got them all in a row in my room.
These houses should be bought when new, and the more people who didn't do that, the higher the price.
THE ONLY WAY TO GET PRICES DOWN, IS THAT NO ONE SHOULD BUY THEM, BUT PEOPLE DO, SO PRICES KEEP HIGH.
THE SAME IS HAPPENING WITH MR. GOLD. PEOPLE ARE STILL CRAZY TO PAY THE HUGH PRICE.

Here is a picture:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/63918996@N06/8580331702/in/photostream/

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By in United States,

I was there, it was a mess. My thoughts are, if you wanted these to go to kids, then don't do a raffle where adults can enter. Or just don't do a raffle at all and hand the figures out to kids in the building area of the booth or throughout the convention hall.

Epic fail on Lego's part.

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By in Canada,

Articles like these are written by sore losers! You have the accounts of a sore losers who percieves in their eyes what happened. Grow the eff up! The only thing Lego did wrong was make the quantities so little.

I just laugh at the notion only kids got them. Those kids must all be sell outs. Just look how many are floating around on Ebay. I had no problem what so ever collecting all 4 of them for a price I was confortable with.

It's another situation of people who are spoiled brats and think they are entitled to everything in life for free. Get over it!

I want an Audi R8, do you see me writing blogs or on forums complaining that they are only cater to the rich!

I have heard first hand from friends I know that were at SDCC and got their hands on Exclusives who happen to be well into their 30's and 40's. I guess Lego saw them as "over grown kids"

*rolls eyes*

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By in United States,

My solution is as follows:

First, your exclusive has to be more that 100-350. I think a run of 5000 spread over all 4 days would be a nice exclusive size.

Second, do not do a raffle. All raffle does is create a mess as most people know raffle actually means "limited supply of tickets".

Licensing issues aside, and I think this gets around the issue, create a 4 figure set and sell it at the Lego Store within the booth along with the other exclusives. But do not create just the 4 figures alone, also include some building element, like a dislpay stand for the figures. From my understanding, licensing agreements keeps Lego from selling individual figures outright unless they contain some sort of building element (that's why the minifig series are not ever licensed themed). If you have noticed all the polybags of just minifigs are giveaways and the ones Lego sells come with a building element.

Using this idea, they could come up with a set of, let's say, Fantastic Four characters with the building element of a display stand or actually something pertaining to the minifigs like in this example, Herbie.

A run of 5000 would give more than a handful of people a chance to get exclusive figures. Oh, and badges must be scanned as well.

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By in United Kingdom,

@Xefan - granted, but a £400 price is still a very, very long way off it being worthwhile to TLG to re-release a set. It shows a good deal of demand compared to the limited supply, but enough to re-release a set into a market that has 6 or more of these type of sets? Add in how it would interfere with their planned product range and it looks even less likely.

@af.riem - nice collection of modulars! I got back into Lego too late so I missed the chance to get a few of the sets when they were new. The problem when people do buy these sets when they are new is that they generally only buy as many as they want to keep. Like you say, there's no choice, it's the way it is.

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By in United States,

A lot of kids must have Ebay accounts...

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By in United States,

I love that the source article includes such dynamic words like "craptastic" and "tix" (instead of tickets). You know that your getting a quality opinion with a vocabulary-building article like that! I really hate to judge someone so harshly, but when writing an editorial, you get get judged.

And I have to agree that with articles like this, the transparent blue bricks when blacklit, and the April Fools day "jokes," Brickset often stoops to the level of the Sun or National Enquirer. Watching the responses to the articles really makes me glad that I do not participate in the AFOL world more than I do. I find it really rather sad how so many "fans" (alleged?) turn on their product of choice.

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By in United States,

I don't have a problem with Lego only wanting to give the figs away to kids, but offering false hope to 1000's of people standing and waiting in a line isn't very cool... Just announce how you are doing your giveaway so everyone is on the same page... There are people(Real collectors) that spent a ton of money to go to SDCC just to get an exclusive...

The bad thing is, the majority of stuff that people get at the comic cons is going to be scalped...

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By in United States,

Great, every reseller is going to be dragging along a kid at next year's SDCC! lol

I was so angry about the VIP keychain fiasco that I thought about giving up my Lego hobby. I couldn't believe the ever changing explanation of who got them and how they only went to the most valuable customers, when you had people claiming that they hardly bought anything and were surprised to have received one. It was a total fiasco and Lego really offended a lot of their customers. I would be equally upset about Mr. Gold had I not been lucky enough to find one, but I do think it was another really bad idea. When you have something that is so hard for people to get it creates this ugly frenzy. Even after finding a Mr. Gold I have spent numerous hours searching for another one.

I agree with Huw that Lego should do away with these exclusives or make them easier to get.

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By in United States,

Hopefully they will show up again at the NYCC and prices will drop.

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By in United States,

Just a few comments about the event and how it was not rigged.

I went to SDCC this past year and had a conversation with the Lego Supervisor in charge of marketing and promotions. They always review the events and try to make them better each year. At SDCC 2012,they gave away 4 minifigures which accounted for 4000 minifigures on Friday. This was a problem because the area was very crowded causing a bottleneck around the Lego booth and causing SDCC security to become concern because the Fire Marshal has strict policies to be followed. They listed all the winning numbers on a board which was a bad idea causing another bottleneck of attendees looking to see if they won and then if you won you would stand in one of four lines depending on which figure you won to receive you minifigure. This was bad because the area was too crowded and SDCC wanted a change.

So, this year they said we are lowering the number of minifigures given away, we are spreading it out over 4 days, and we are not posting a list, instead you go online to a site to see if you won and then if you won, redeem at the booth. All of these adjustment would eliminate the bottlenecks and long lines from last year.

Well, on Thursday the decided to hand out tickets at 11:30 and the lines or mobs of attendees got out of hand really quickly. This attracts SDCC security and the Fire Marshall so they had to shut the line 45 minutes into the raffle giveaway. They did not reopen that day.

On the last 3 days of the raffle giveaway they moved the line outside. This was a better system because they could spread out the line over a lot of space around the back of the convention center. The tickets were randomly placed in two bags where you picked which bag and stuck your hand into the bag to pick your raffle ticket. They did not hand you a ticket, so it was random!!

On Friday and Saturday they were not scanning badges because of concerns that the line was so long that this would slow down the line and they would not be able to hand out raffle tickets to everybody. By not scanning badges, scalpers went through the line up to five to six times in the 2 hour window to increase their chances of winning.

On Sunday, they decided to scan badges to limit each attendee to one chance at the raffle and it worked well because they did have enough time to service the entire line and hand out raffle tickets to everyone that wanted one. This was the best solution because the line was outside and did not disrupt the rest of the convention, everybody had one chance at the raffle and scalpers could not get two tickets, the raffle was random where you choose what bag to pick from and it was easy to see if you won online

So, they do review the issues and try to make it better year after year and day after day. I think by reducing the number of figures made sense if you look at last year's issues with trying to give out 4000 in one day. However, if they go with this year's model, I think they can go back to giving out 4000 figures throughout the 4 days,
Steps for Success at SDCC 2014
1)Keep the line outside-This worked well and did not cause any Fire Marshal issues
2)Hand out one raffle ticket randomly to each attendee-scan all badges
3)Check online to see if you won.
4)Pick up at the lego booth
5)Increase the number of minifugures given away to 1000 each day (This will reduce the prices on ebay)
6)SDCC security should remove scalpers from around the lego booth to discourage the buying of figures for resale on ebay.

Also, the Lego Supervisor told me that they will not be at the New York Comic Con this year because they did the Times Square event a few months ago for the unveiling of the life size X-Wing which took a big part of their budget.

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By in United States,

The unscrupulous problems of LEGO promotional raffles-

Wow. First world problems indeed.

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By in United States,

@Redbrick37112

Just to add to what you said and include my observations...

"Well, on Thursday the decided to hand out tickets at 11:30 and the lines or mobs of attendees got out of hand really quickly. This attracts SDCC security and the Fire Marshall so they had to shut the line 45 minutes into the raffle giveaway. They did not reopen that day."

Actually, the drawing was over before 11:30 as they handed them out early. I know, I was there at 11:30 and they said it was over.

"The tickets were randomly placed in two bags where you picked which bag and stuck your hand into the bag to pick your raffle ticket. They did not hand you a ticket, so it was random!!"

Again, not actual. I went through the line on Saturday and Sunday, both days I was handed a ticket, I did not get to reach into the bag.

"On Sunday, they decided to scan badges to limit each attendee to one chance at the raffle and it worked well because they did have enough time to service the entire line and hand out raffle tickets to everyone that wanted one."

Yes, they did eventually scan badges but not right away and they only did that because they caught a few people trying to go through the line again. I was within the first 250 in line and when I got to the front they did not scan my badge or anyone in my 5 person group.

Oh, and by the way, we had 2 kids with us on Sunday and neither won.

I do like your solutions, they seem that they can work, especially the increased exclusive size.

I also know two separate adults that won a Spider Man and Superman figure.

Sad they won't be at NYCC.

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By in United Kingdom,

@zipsforbananas I think it definitely shows enough demand. If they're consistently selling at £400 then you can guarantee there will be many more people who'd buy it at the standard £100 - £150 Lego would sell them at and still make a healthy profit on.

I don't see that it'd be disruptive to existing set sales because a) there's no sign that Lego isn't shifting the sets it has anyway even if it offered more, and b) it's far more disruptive that people are giving £400 to resellers than it is to Lego themselves. Lego are going to sell way more sets in general if the people currently handing £400 to a reseller are spending £150 on the set and then another £250 on other sets in store rather than buying nothing in store as they are currently when spending £400 at a reseller.

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By in United States,

It is not fair that lego gives this stuff out at events that most of us can not get to. NO MORE. Make more set with these figs.

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By in United Kingdom,

A better solution would be to have roaming staff with bags of them selling a total of something like 30,000 of them for a few dollars each (130,000 people attend the event apparently). Scalper problem solved, queueing for tickets problem solved, queueing for raffle problem solved.

This would make everyone happy and solve the health and safety issues. No one is going to complain about paying a couple of dollars for them if they genuinely want them.

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By in United States,

People seem to be forgetting that last year the figures were made available via means other than the raffle. At the DC booth, if you played Batman 2 video game they gave you a redemption ticket to take to the WB and get either Shazam or Bizarro.

Marvel was handing them out on Sunday to kids and collectors.

Not to forget that they had people going around and randomly handing out the redemption tickets throughout the hall.

The only problem I saw last year was when they posted the winners. They fixed that with the website. Go back to scanning badges and then post winners online. It would keep down on the congestion at the Lego booth as you can go by at anytime to get scanned. I don't like the ticket idea as all that does it make you have to stand in yet another line.

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By in Canada,

Sometimes I suspect Lego is trying to destroy the resale market all together.

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By in United States,

If they wanted to destroy it, produce 50,000 of each, not 200-350.

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By in United States,

Not cool Lego.

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By in United States,

Remember people, it has yet to be proven that Lego did anything wrong.

Really they only thing they can be guilty of is creating a crazy secondary market for these figures by the small amount of figures they produced.

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By in United States,

They have got to do an episode of this on the Big Bang Theory! "So what did you do today? I found a cure for breast cancer./ "I'm studying quantum theory with Stephan Hawkings./ Sheldon, what did you do today? /I won 1.5 ounces of molded limited edition plastic? Bazinga punk!"

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By in United States,

When Lego gets people mad.
1st- they rise the prices
2nd- They put out a limited number of a special minifig in series 10
3rd- They rig the minifig raffles ( you cant really blam them about wanting kids to get them because they would most likely want to keep it)

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By in United Kingdom,

To be honest although I think the artificial scarcity idea is just braindead I agree with some of the comments above that there's no evidence that Lego really actually did rig anything and it does seem to be entirely based on hearsay from one guy. That's not a lot of evidence to be fair.

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By in United States,

It's a toy. I think kids should get a good percentage of any special offerings. Young'uns are still LEGO's key market.

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By in United States,

Another idea, if Lego continues to give out exclusive minifigures at SDCC they might think of moving everything outside to the SDCC "campus". Lego had a great display outside the convention center featuring a life size Bilbo's house which was a replica of the "Unexpected Gathering" set plus a few lifesize Superheroes. They could do the giveaway here and just hand out 1000 figures each day. This would eliminate the raffle, the lines inside for the giveaway and redemption and would decrease the prices on ebay because of the additonal supply.

The giveaway could be at 5pm so it would not interfere with other lines such as "Hall H" and the line could run the entire boardwalk.

They could also hand out tickets when you get in line guaranteeing you get a figure, this would eliminate line cutters or people letting the friends jump in the line and discourage anybody from lining up after they gave out 1000 tickets.

Also scan the badge when you get the figure to ensure everybody only gets one figure. I hate scalpers!!! I was on the Hasbro SDCC exclusive line on Thursday morning and I just love seeing the same stupid scalpers in line in front of me and then all there friends jump in the line thus causing me to wait additional time to get a chance to buy the exclusives. Scalping in not just a Lego problem but a issue everywhere at SDCC. They need to hand out tickets on the line to eliminate line cutting and place holding. No ticket, no exclusives fro you!!

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By in United States,

I want to give everyone another chance to read what @ytjedi wrote above, since it deserves more consideration:

The point is, we don't know all the time for sure how these exclusives are set up, but it is just as likely Marvel and Warner Bros are going to LEGO and saying "We want you to make X number of minifigs from (insert relevant show/movie here) and give them out at (important event)".

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By in United States,

I see many ideas, much anger, and many views on how people should act. Last year I was angry, this year my Lego purchasing dropped by about $5,000. I am only one customer, but the truth that I returned to Lego after my dark ages was partially due to the non-exclusivity of the product, is real.

Items I hope to someday have, but will not spend a paycheck on = Green Lantern, Green Arrow, Bizarro, and Shazam. I guess I like Green and Z.

I hear ideas for how to "fix" the giveaways, but I kind of believe that the loss of my $5,000 this year does not equate to the overall positive advertisement Lego has received due to these giveaways. I say positive because the frustration is inside the AFOL community as a whole (though the size of this community should warrant some reaction from Lego - such as the survey HUW posted earlier this week).

In truth, the packaging is as valuable to a collector as the figure. So I ask TLG this, is is possible to do variations of the free give-aways that can be purchased online, by anyone? Demand and interest exists. Profit can be made, and exclusivity will remain. In the end, a good number of fans now in the Lego universe are completists ... they just want to complete their sets. Does it have to be the exact figure? maybe in case of Shazam, it does? But for Green Arrow, no, it does not.

The SDCC effect will bring negative and positive results to TLG. It will cause some fans of Lego to realize that TLG is moving in new directions within their brand and marketing; and it will piss many of us off to no end.

On that note, I need to complete a moc of people curling. I'd love it if Shazam and Green Lantern were on my curling team, but if TLG wishes to not offer me those minifigures, due to other end-goals in their marketing campaign, I only have the power to either keep purchasing or limit my purchases. I just hope TLG understands that they had an innocent product that seemed legitimately equal, and exclusives always remove equality at some level.

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By in Thailand,

@Brickarmor I agree that may be TLC not ready to make large number of minifigs for this year.

Or may be they've loose their instructions (SDCC sets). :)

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By in United States,

I completely agree! One of the best things I used to like about lego is that you could pretty much get any set or pieces you wanted without having to spend thousands to get a particular minifigure you wanted. With these new exclusives going for hundreds and even thousands of dollars it is becoming very frustrating and expensive. I would have really liked to have the new Azog figure, but can't afford to pay a thousand dollars plus on ebay for one.

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By in Italy,

LEGO it's a toy. And toys are meant for kids. Cheers.

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By in United States,

It wouldn't surprise me at all if the rigged it so only kids could win. I'm almost 20, and I've entered a couple LEGO building competitions myself. I never win, though. When I do see the winners in my next LEGO Club magazine, all the winners are always early teens or younger. Plus, (not meaning to boast or anything) my entry would have obviously won over some of the kids' creations. I think LEGO just wants to make the kids feel good and therefore only allows them to win. Also, I never see any "Cool Creations" in my magazine that are built by anyone over 13. They are always rainbow-colored creations built by kids.

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By in United States,

Far better in the hands of kids than in those of scalpers and resellers. Every year that there has been exclusive minifigures, people do nothing but complain about how they were distributed and how it was unfair in some way or another. It's obvious that the general AFOL community is far too greedy and not mature enough to have these giveaways. People are blinded by the thought that they are entitled to these figs because "SDCC is about adults" or "I've been attending this event far longer" and other nonsense. Everyone is behaving like children, and the obvious solution is to stop the giveaways. We had a good thing going and our incessant whining ruined it.

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By in Indonesia,

Great Job LEGO!!!!!
Rigged the raffle systems for kids is better than seeing the raffle winner put the limited edition minifig on ebay.

Life is not perfect, you can't get a perfect life, perfect health and perfect complete lego super heroes minifigs.
hahaha..........

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By in United Kingdom,

^^ The honest solution, if that's what they intended, would have been to give the tickets out to kids only.

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By in United States,

@ CapnRex101
For the time being I have to agree, since there has been no official word from Lego. I would guess that if it was "rigged" then it was probably some booth idiots hired exclusively for SDCC. If that isn't the case... That would be pretty shocking, after the whole 65 year old guy getting kicked out of Legoland. :P

(Even so I still would have liked to have had one of those Green Arrow minifigs. :P)

@ Kulturkampf
Ditto on that one. :P

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By in United States,

I. Am. OUTRAGED! Alright, it was nice that they gave the tickets to kids and not to whoever paid them, but still. I can't believe it! *Sigh* But at least the kids won't sell them on eBay for outrageous prices.

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By in United States,

in years past they gave out harry potter and indiana jones minifigs (in clear plastic bags i think) to EVERYONE that walked up to the booth during certain times. they didn't put them on exclusive cards or anything and that worked GREAT... i don't think they were exclusive characters but they could have done it with exclusives just the same and printed up several thousand. who would be mad about that? last year i was there and they were handing out phoenix on the floor. i asked for one and they said ONLY KIDS can get them. i actually have two kids that would have loved it, i just wasn't dragging them around the dangerously crowded comic-con floor at the time.

if they had any idea how much i spend on LEGOs per year they would care a little more about how insulting it is to say that LEGOs are for kids.

if they want to give out exclusives to kids, send them out to elementary schools or send to kids in the Lego club or give them to all kids going to legoland or something like that, but don't distribute at comic-con

we want these minifigs for our collections, just sell them to us already. do a dc minifig series and a marvel minifig series(with phoenix and spiderwoman). we want it and you own the rights so just make it and take our money, please!!!

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By in United States,

Are you f***ing serious, Lego was somewhat meant for kids. If anything, it would be like giving a baseball from a famous person to a kid instead of an adult collecter, it just makes them for acceptable to the kid fans of Lego. Now, if it was that Clone Lieutenant back from June, I would be more inclined to flip some s***.

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By in Germany,

I have not heard anything good come out of these exclusives so far. No parent reporting "My daughter got lucky and didn't let go of her spider-woman ever since", no TFOL who became the happiest fanboy in the world, no collector who still can consider his collection complete.

There were a few suggestions now about how things should be dealt with in the future, my two favorites being:
only make variants or early releases of existing figures OR stop it!

As pointed out earlier: this leaves so much more people unhappy than happy that it's just not worth it.

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By in United Kingdom,

as with all hard to come by lego, there will be those who are true collectors and and might be lucky to get a sniff of a set, then those like me , who never get a any where near the limited editions as I live so far from any lego store or event, so pointless trying and then the rest who grab as many as they can to turn a fast buck .. just greedy..

until lego move the goal posts and give all of the option to get a fair chance to pick up a limited edition, its always going to end up with tears and recriminations and finger pointing..

if anything underhand has gone on, I hope the whistle is blown and the facts come out ..

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By in United States,

Personally, I like there being something unachievable/unacquirable, it's humbling, but it's not fair to others.

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By in United States,

This is disgusting. LEGO needs to understand that it doesn't only cater to children, but to people of all ages.

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By in United States,

I personally think the application of exclusives and Mr. Gold in Lego doesn't fit. I have always loved the fact that if there is a set you want Lego gives you time and opportunity to get it. If a set is selling out they make more. They have always prided themselves on getting their products into the hands of those who want it. The introduction of exclusives has created a negativity in the community. If you want to give away minifigs at a convention that's great just make sure the rest of world has a chance to get them.

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By in United States,

Are people really mad that they possibly rigged it to get these pieces into the hands of people the most likely to not immediately go home and throw them up on ebay and actually cherish them?

come on people.

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By in United Kingdom,

While Lego can run their promotion however they feel they should.
NOBODY has a right to get the freebies.
BUT rigging the raffle is just plainly wrong.

However if Lego are trying to reward the people who go to the CON's then they need to make sure they produce enough figures for each and every person who goes to the CON.
The CON organisers know how many people attended last year and how many people may attend next year.

Now it is possible that Lego will have spare figures that are left over.
Those spare figures can either be given out at the end of the CON, in a first come first served manner.
Or they could offer to sell them at a premium price to the first VIP members who apply? £10 each would be a reasonable price. This would also limit the scalpers.

This way all the CON goers get the figures and some VIP's get rewarded....

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By in United States,

huw thanks for telling us ,I am so mad but for another reason. I blame those dum collectors! well I guss I do collect legos but still... any way didn't some one get a green lantern and this may be a test, lego is atempting to get collecters off there tail plus how can you know the nice happy guy you belive is not a collector is not going to loop around and get another ticket, lego was just playing it safe.

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By in United States,

I have just read through the comments and all I saw here was whining and complaining from "adult" fans of Lego.

Stop acting so entitled to everything. So what if you did not get your hands on a single minifigure. The world is not over. You will not die without it. this entire conspiratorial theory is made up by someone who is just a sore loser.

@ krklint and to the rest of the people claiming your not going to spend as much on Lego's anymore because you did not get a single figure, grow up. Honestly. The money you don't spend on sets just means there will be more sets for people who actually are a fan of Lego Young or Old. Just because you have Money does not mean you are entitled to free things. Trying to use boycotting your money against a toy company because they ALLEGEDLY gave out more free toys to kids then adult is just juvenile.

To the many asking Lego to make tens of thousands of these figures and just sell them, They can't. How many times does it have to be explained to you that Lego can not sell licensed figures by themselves. Even if they included a "stand" to build it still would be considered an action figure because the stand is not the main focus, the figure is. Stop asking Lego to sell just the figures. It is not going to happen and whining about it won't change that.

If anything look at the new Tower of Orthac. $200. Only one exclusive figure, a character that only die hard fans will care about. Even if kids see the movies they aren't going to like worm tail enough to beg their parents for the figure. At the same time Lego made Wizard Battle. It has Gandalf and Sauramon for $12.99. This is the best example of how Lego is slowly working to kill the after market on these figures. By putting big name characters in cheaper sets they purposely are killing the aftermarket value on these figures. It is brilliant because now you don't have re sellers marching into Lego stores and buying 5 or more Tower of Orthac's at once because one figure in the set is going for $30+ dollars. This allows more people who actually want the set to be able to buy it since the stores have not run out of stock just because a handful of rich re sellers.

Most of the people commenting here have made me tired of the AFOL community. It is comment boards filled with hate like this that makes TLG take steps to further themselves from the AFOL community.

Also to the Whiners who say Lego should produce Mr.Gold and other exclusive figures in mass...doesn't that make them not an exclusive anymore? What would be the point of an "exclusive" that everyone and their mom can get. That is more or less false advertising.

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By in United States,

I mean it must suck to want one of these and not be able to get one for free. But, we are talking about a toy meant for children. I'm sure Lego wants to minimize the outrageous costs associated with reselling their product. and if I was a toy manufacturer i'd certainly focus on promoting to children over adult collectors

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By in Canada,

It sounds like a lose-lose situation for LEGO. It doesn't matter what they do in a situation like this, people will always complain when they don't get a free mini-figure. Even if they only gave out a limited number of mini-figures only to children in future years, some AFOL's will still be upset and complain that they're being excluded. It does sound like a lot of whining to me. The view that LEGO should stop giving out exclusives sounds more like, "I didn't get one so no one else should."

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By in United States,

you are right brixton , promos are good. if there are no promos people would turn to custom minifigs lego would lose buissness and for every one who complained (witch is not all of you) you would NEVER EVER get a tiny tiny chance to get whatever. and chagger113 not every comment was complants and donovansdad you copied me.

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By in New Zealand,

What a load of rubbish - some bitter teenager posts a blog, completely deriding Lego and people actually believe it?

I've got some bridges I would like to sell you, if that is the case.

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By in New Zealand,

I would have to agree with Charger13 - the people moaning on here are not real fans of Lego.

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By in United States,

@ Starwars55588. No not every comment was whining. But the Majority of comments are and it is disgusting. This is just first world problems to the max. Everyone needs to chill out and realize they are not a special little snowflake.

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By in United States,

Charger113, I want to step up and support you in what you wrote. Three times today, I sat to write similarly but much more bluntly and with much less tact. I didn't submit any of those post because they did come off as rude.

LEGO is a toy company. They are not a humanitarian campaign. They do not care and do not need to care about the AFOL community. They are making enough profit elsewhere and need to turn that elsewhere into the next generation of AFOLs. If you are an AFOL, LEGO owns you. They do not owe you anything. You chose the lifestyle. They did not promise you anything. You became a fan. If you decide to change that relationship, LEGO will not miss you. You love LEGO but LEGO is a money-making company that cannot love.

Would it be inspiring if LEGO were more than a money-making company? Sure. Does LEGO put on a mask sometimes and make themselves look like a compassionate being in order to fools those that can be fooled into thinking they care about more than just making money? Sure. But LEGO is just a company out to make money- exactly what it should be. If youon't like go out and start your own company. Am I being radical and unrealistic with that suggestion. Absolutely, but so are so many who are calling foul with what LEGO allegedly did, which I don't think they did, but would applaud them if they admitted that they had.

I'm thinking there are many Brickset members whose mommies let them win Candyland when they were little.

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By in United States,

charger113, I know

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By in United States,

ericjohn, I do not agree with the guys who are unhappy, yet I respect them unlike you do and I don't respect that, lego cares about you, me, and every one that is why they did this ,to stop the collectors ,in the furture they may make the figures. now LETS STOP THE RESALES AND SUPPORT LEGO!!!!!!

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By in Australia,

Outrageous

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By in United States,

Posts like this are what make me a little embarrassed to admit I like playing with and collecting lego. Anybody who would be outraged that a giveaway was rigged to make sure kids got some toys, regardless of whether or not those kids appreciated how rare and special the giveaway was, really needs a reality check.

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By in Australia,

@hanks75, hear hear!

go the Lego shop
buy some bricks
build a bridge
and get over it.

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By in Canada,

The first time I heard mini figures were being given as exclusives to people who attended certain events I knew that it would end on a bad tone.

The only thing that should be exclusively given should be posters etc.. this type of give away does not effect the world population of lego collectors, and helps reduce scalping.

Every Exclusive figure should be available to all boys, girls and adults alike, world wide.

The fact that they discontinue after a certain amount of time makes them Exclusive enough.

Thats my take.

-The fact it was rigged is a shame on the brand name for sure-

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By in United States,

How dare they give these toys to children! I mean with these antics you would think this vile company is aiming their products at children.

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By in United States,

I will quote from an FBTB poster. Though he was posting about the comic crash in the 90's, I think it (eventually) will come into play here:

"Chase variants are not made for the benefit of collectors, they are made at the expense of collectors. The collectable industry is not better for these things. Short term profiteering has disillusioned many a collector and these industries have suffered for it. "

I've seen it happen to many a CCG (Collectable Card Game). Do I think SDCC minifigs will RUIN Lego as a brand? Of course not, it's too strong a brand for that. However, I do think it's an overall trend for the company that is worrisome and shows some signs of short sighted thinking.

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By in United States,

"Kids don’t resell figures on eBay. They play with them in their sets, swap body parts and get them dirty. " -Straight from the article.

What? oh no! Not swapping body parts! Getting them dirty! Blaspheme!

After reading that bit in the article I knew I this guy lost all credibility. His claim is incredibly weak to begin with and there are conflicting stories on this comment board and on FBTB.net own forums on what actually happened.

The fact that this has become such a big deal today really makes me ashamed to be a AFOL.

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By in United States,

So what we've gathered from this post is that the original editorial was flat out wrong - everyone on here that went to SDCC confirmed minifigs went to adults and kids alike.

Seeing as the original post has been discredited numerous times, can the post be taken down and the thread locked? The only thing happening now is getting people wrongfully upset at LEGO based on an incorrect editorial. Many people visit this site without reading comments and thus only go by the information in the original post. It just seems wrong to incite a mob over wrong information...

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By in United States,

Can we please stop calling this a fan site? I have been noticing this for quite some time now; there is more bashing of LEGO then appreciating it as of late.

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By in Australia,

As far as I’m concerned, well done LEGO if they did “rig” the event to make sure children got the product. If you’re an adult playing a game with a child you never play to beat them.

The idea of these promotions is to inspire fun and to make kids feel special for being there. The product is after all made primarily for children to enjoy playing with more than it is made for adults to collect.

I think sometimes adult fans and collectors have a bit of a tendency to forget this.

We should just be happy that some kid gets to feel special and say they “won”..... and then try to buy it on ebay when it comes up for sale later.. ; P

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By in United States,

When did this site's "news" just become complaining about anything LEGO does?

"I don't have a Mr. Gold! I want one mommy!!!! Mommy go buy me one!!!!"
Then there is the complaining that it's a kid's toy and that the kids can't get the mini-figure.

"I want a black suit Spider-man! I can't get one. waaaahhhhhhh!"
Then you complain when LEGO "sets up" to get the minifigures to kids.

LEGO can't win a break.

And 98% of the people here didn't go to SDCC, never will, never meet anyone who did. So really, stop complaining. Maybe this site should get back to just being a LEGO database because the "news" here is a joke.

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By in United States,

"Every Exclusive figure should be available to all boys, girls and adults alike, world wide.

The fact that they discontinue after a certain amount of time makes them Exclusive enough.

That's my take.

-The fact it was rigged is a shame on the brand name for sure-"

Double Kudos to fuelbreak.

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By in United States,

I was there all 5 days (5th day is preview night). I had kids with me and no one in my family won anything. We did the raffle every day. I saw both kids and adults win, so I don't think it was rigged for kids to win. I do think that some "special" people were given winning tickets by higher up staff. I saw on Thursday night after they had sent everyone away a lego staff member (very tall guy) who seemed higher up the chain go to a lock box pull out some tickets and then palm a few tickets to an attendee who he was talking with. Then again on Friday I saw the same thing with a different attendee. What was the most bothersome for me was many of the winners having multiple winning tickets. Many of the winners claimed 2 or 3 figures at a time (all by them selves with no one else with them). I saw one guy who I know to be a ebay/swapmeet seller get 5 Spiderwomen, 3 Superman and 2 Green arrows. And even worse then that was to stand in line with these people and listen to them talk about how "they were gonna flip the 3 figures they got the day before for $1500". I've been going to SDCC for 20 years now and ever since Lego started showing up my family has loved their booth, but for the last 4 or 5 years the lego experience has been declining. This year hit an all time low and really left some bitter feeling for the Lego group. Oh, and many of their booth employee's were down right rude this year (one lady stands out). I understand that they were being asked the same questions over and over but they are being paid to represent Lego, so being short and rude to fans is probably not something they should be doing.

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By in United States,

I'm not sure what to make of this. I don't understand why Lego would want to rig it - from a marketing viewpoint, they would probably want tons of people hyped about promos so they can advertise their products. Rigging the system only makes people upset - my desires to get SDCC minifigs have just dropped significantly.

Lego will eventually have to say something, though, to clear the skies or break the ice. Lets hope they come out clean and innocent (although seems unlikely).

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By in United States,

@I want more Legos

I was at a toy show last weekend and was told similar stories of the same people winning multiple figures... They also said that groups of winning tickets had to be predetermined...

I could care less about minifigures as I am a Technic guy, but it definitely isn't fair to the legit people that waited in line and really wanted the minifigs for their own personal collection...

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By in United States,

I find these allegations a little hard to believe. I mean wouldn't it be pretty obvious something's up if the people handing out tickets are giving kids all the ones they are holding in their hand while they are making adults draw tickets from the bag? And even more so apprent when all the winners are kids?

Even IF these allegations are true its not THAT bad. I mean its not like one of the people handing out tickets had a bunch of friends there and they rigged it so all his friends won all the minifigures and they split them later on to sell. At least they were going to kids who should be the priority. Its like Robin Hood stealing from the rich to gove to the poor. ha the stealing is technically wrong, but its for a good cause.

Plus Lego could of easily just announced the figs were going right to the first X amount of kids in line like someone else said. The only bad part about the way they did it would been wasting adults time by making them stand in line if they did in fact have no chance, or very little chance of winning.

In the end these exclusive minifigure events sound like like nothing but a hassal for all involved and should just be done away with IMO.

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By in United Kingdom,

Possibly the most rubbish article I've ever read - the whole premise is that LEGO know the winning numbers beforehand, but unless I missed it there's no explanation given for how we know, that LEGO knew the winners before the tickets were handed out.

Didn't one of our very own AFOLS get 4 or something?

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By in United Kingdom,

Only saw this article because of my app, switched this news off in my account and really wish I hadn't seen it!
Lego is for children and its quite apparent that some of the AFOLS on here really haven't grown up so no wonder they having a hissy fit about Lego apparently giving preference to actual children.
Having said that if people where able to get multiples just to sell on eBay that's sad but there is a way to stop it! Stop paying ridiculous money for them!! The hobbit azog sold for $1650 so no wonder this rubbish is happening!! People paying this sort of money for bits of lego no wonder people are doing it!! Just like Mr. Gold why oh why pay +£500 for a something that some one paid £1.99 for are you people for real!!! And then you get mad about it?!?
People paying silly money for bits of lego has created this monster and it is taking the joy and pleasure out of loving lego as an adult as a hobby and a past time!
Please step back and look at why you have your lego collection, is it for exclusive minifigures or is it just simply for the joy that building with lego brings you?

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By in Spain,

I think were these allegations, or those from Iwantmorelegos above, accurate then it would reflect very badly on Lego. In the first instance, the decision to only hand out to kids would be ok in and of itself but only if the rules had been communicated in advance.

I'd like to address some of the other comments as well. Those that state that Lego is entirely a children's product are clearly talking nonsense. Some of the products are obviously aimed at older teens and adults. Furthermore, Lego is well aware that there is a significant AFOL community that supports it which I'm sure may well be small in number but accounts for a much greater proportion of its turnover.

The second comment relates to the collectible element of the products - some have suggested that Lego is purely a toy, not a collectible. My view is that it is both - and the beauty of the product is that it meets the needs of both players and collectors equally. The first group of people won't care about exclusives. The second clearly does as it makes completing the collection far more difficult. We know Lego cares primarily about the first group as its primary market. Should Lego care about the second? My view is it already does - it actively markets its products in a way to appeal to collectors. As such, it's entirely reasonable for a collector to complain when Lego releases its products in such a way as to prevent a collection being completed (and Mr Gold is a great example of this). Lego can ignore the complaints if it chooses; collectors can live with it or stop collecting - a proportion will choose the latter option.

At the end of the day though, these are commercial for Lego to make. What I can't understand is how alienating a proportion of adult collectors (who clearly make up an element of the target market) can make commercial sense. Does the marketing benefit from SDCC really outweigh that brand damage?

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By in United Kingdom,

In this thread:

White knights use 5 paragraphs to tell AFOLs to grow up and get over their obsession with 'little plastic toys' whilst themselves having a user name and account on a site which caters exclusively to that obsession.

AFOLs who value certain figs or sets for their rarity and exclusivity moan about the limited availability of an exclusive item because they don't have one.

Parents complain because their kids can't/ wont be told "Sorry, no you cannot have one"

LEGO get it in the neck for alledgedly giving toys to kids whilst making life difficult for evil scalpers.

A speculative article with no proof whatsoever causes uproar, but most people posting on here will still go and spend money on more LEGO within a week anyway, a fair amount on the same resale market which has driven the absolutely bananas prices for these items.

I tire of pointing out ironies, decide it's a slow news day and get back to work.

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By in United Kingdom,

How has this descended into name calling?
Are people really whining unreasonably?
Or is this a site dedicated to fans of Lego who do genuinely feel aggrieved who are venting in the perfect, most appropriate place - in fact, in a thread where they were actually invited to share their reaction?

And can people please stop saying, "Lego is for kids!"
ONE of Lego's market-S is children.
But seriously, take a look at this specific case...

Lego produces minifigures for the SDCC - an event attended primarily by adult sci-fi and comic book fans.
The minifigures are of Marvel and DC characters, some who are less mainstream niche characters who do not feature in Saturday morning cartoons but are found only in the adult comic books.
So who is the primary target market?
Blindingly obviously it is ADULT comic book fans, NOT kids!

AFOLs do have a right to an opinion on a product designed specifically for them, even if they weren't there.
If you can't appreciate someone's love for specific characters in amongst their love for building Lego, shut up and stop having a go at people whose appreciation for Lego is more nuanced than yours! And please, please, please, quit whining that people are whining! You're just making it worse!! ;)

(Saying all that, I do agree with @Charger113's point on the figures in the Tower of Orthanc and I think it's great that only one figure is exclusive so scalpers won't be buying 5 at a time and splitting them!)

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By in United Kingdom,

Seems I'm not the only one riled by AFOLs who think an adult loving Lego is immature whining about people whining! @jondesouza, @delatron, right on!

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By in Bolivia,

"White knights"

I am so tired of people calling other people "white knights". Specially because it began as an argument from misogynistic dudes bashing guys who are not. Please stop.
......
"Also, even if it were true, OMG, Lego's giving free toys to kids! They must me stopped!"

Did you at least bother read the whole thing before commenting? It is not that they were giving free toys to kids. It is about doing it and still letting adults wait in the queue. If this is true, they wasted people's time, and we are talking about comic con, in which time is really a huge constraint. If they claimed from the beginning that the raffle was for kids only, this wouldn't be an issue.

What about, for example, parents that waited in the queue for their own children?

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By in United States,

Just to be clear, I have no problem with adults buying and loving Lego. Heck, I am one of them, as I am sure most people visiting and posting this site are. I would just prefer if kids got exclusives. At least then you know they are (usually) going to played with rather than when adults get them (especially non-Lego fans), and let them sit in their package forever just to be sold for exorbitant amounts.

The problem I have with this particular raffle is if it wasn't clear kids were the priority and it gave adults a false sense of being able to win. That is deceitful on Legos part and a huge waste of time for the adults. If they were going to make it a kids only event just say so, they have them all the time at the Lego store and at TRU.

In all honesty I am against exclusives anyways though. If Lego is going to do them, just pre-release a figure that will be in a set later in the year, OR do something like the micro Bag End set. In both cases you still get something unique with the package, but you don't get an exclusive minifigure that may never be released again. That just encourages scalping and takes all the fun out of things.

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By in United Kingdom,

HaHaHa - put your time, effort & energy into something more productive.

"I'M OUTRAGED!! An object I was never going to get (that's aimed at kids) has actually been given to kids! So now me and my knuckle dragging friends are going to cause a fuss on the Internet... Largely because those kids are going to PLAY with the object and not EBAY it where I was hoping to pick it up.. Probably right after I blogged about how eBay scammers are scum."

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By in United States,

Zip made a really good point, as far as I was always aware, the majority of target audience of SDCC had always been adults... Isn't it several hundred dollars for a 4 day pass..? I think it would be different if Lego was giving the figs away to kids at one of the Discovery Centers or something like that, but the driving force behind this major toy show is adults...

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By in United States,

@ Delatron I have to disagree with the white knight statements here. Internet knights rush to defend someone or something they feel is too weak to protect itself to try to gain favor with said someone. Lego by no means is weak and cares not if someone defends them against a silly allegation by a sore loser on the Internet.

If anything the adults telling the other adults to grow up is not because those adults collect and play with lego. It's because by whining and complaining that they did not get something and a child did they want special treatment. Attitudes like that in the community are slowly killing it as people, like myself, will distance myself from LUGs and other AFOL's because of their childish actions.

@ everyone still believing this garbage. Look though the comments, some parents were there with children and did not win. There were adult there that won figures. It was a raffle. It was random. Even if there was some favoritism let it go. Crying about not getting something and wanting lego to stop all exclusives just because you did not get one is again not very adult on your part.

"Oh but my time was wasted by standing in line" Manage your time better. You knew by standing in that line there was a chance you would win and a chance you would lose. Do you whine like this after you buy lotto tickets and not win? You knew before you got in that line that standing there was only for the chance to get a figure not a promise. If other AFOL'S are reporting that they, as adults got figures, then clearly it was not rigged to any extreme. Just look how many of these things are sitting around on eBay. Clearly adults got their hands on them and waited just like you.

Just because you entered for a chance to win something and did not win does not mean you have to try to tarnish a companies reputation. Get over yourself.

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By in United Kingdom,

Thanks Paul, it seemed a bit glaring amongst the calls to grow up!
How many kids have ever even heard of Green Arrow?

@Vroomo - thanks for the motivational push. Gee, if you hadn't said that my total contribution to society this week would have been brickset posts! You saved my life! ;)
You might want to pick your own dragging knuckles up though by the way, either you can't read or you can't understand argument, coz the reasons people are outraged have been articulated, and are quite a lot more complex than you seem to have grasped.

@Charger113 - There are discussions here over the place of exclusive giveaways within TLG's portfolio, the impact of this strategy on long-term public image, etc. This is far bigger than individual people moaning at their own misfortune or just that they didn't get something they wanted.
You yourself might want to follow your own advice, if you can get up that high.

Sorry, I should wind my neck in, I'm starting to whine!

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By in Canada,

I have not had a chance to go to SDCC but I have been to many comic book conventions in Toronto and sometimes things can be run very poorly with the guests, give-aways and anything else that can happen at a comic-con.

After reading about the SDCC give-away. It seems the staff were overwhelmed with the response of enthusiasts and tried to do their best to handle things. Whether they were actual employees of Lego or convention volunteers I do not know. I don't think it was 'rigged' necessarily as the people that day likely thought that was the better option to ensure the toys went to the kids. However as noble as that sentiment is kids do not spend lots of money in order to go to SDCC. It's primarily for adults who enjoy comics, movies, cosplay, meeting actors and actresses and getting autographs. In addition people come to buy things too. The super hero mini-figures are directly geared for adults not kids, that is why they are at SDCC. To expose the brand to more adults who will want to buy into it. i.e. "That Green Arrow is amazing, I did not think Lego made such things! What else do they have?" As one can see, there are many 'toys' at any Comic-con because adults buy them.

My initial thought was simple, if there are freebies at SDCC and just make sure there is a chance to get one from Lego S@H after spending a certain amount or some other deal as has been mentioned. I would think that the promo department will be rethinking their options about attending SDCC if there is too much of a back lash. Lego is a very positive toy and force for many AFOLs so I would hate to see them pull out to keep the brand tarnish free.

But one final point sticks out. Fairness. I would say Lego is a very fair company. They listen to fans, offer excellent customer service both in store and online. With that in mind, Lego should keep things fair. Exclusives though fun to get one hardly makes things fair. I would love to own some of these figures but I like many do not possess the means to acquire one whether by being at SDCC or spending hefty amounts on ebay. Lego is not a cheap toy, but keeping things fair makes the fan feel appreciated.

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By in United Kingdom,

ITT: people try to correct me on the correct interwebz usage of 'white knights'

And I just don't care :)

I used that term because I thought 'moralising crusader-trolls' sounded a little bit harsh.

Back onto Lego please.

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By in United States,

Let me restate a few things:

1) I don't think the raffle was rigged. I had kids with me, none of us won and I saw plenty of adults and kids win figures.

2) I saw with my own eyes an employee palm tickets to an attendee (2 different times). I do not know if they were winning tickets but I do know that the person that received tickets on Thursday in this way did later pick up figures (more then 1). But so few tickets were given out Thursday that it may be the case that if you got a ticket you won, I don't know?

3) I saw many people picking up multiple figures at one time, but that does not mean it was fixed. They may have been in a group or went through the line many times.

4) It is not Legos fault that I had to listen to ebay scalpers in line. I was just saying that it sucked.

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By in United Kingdom,

hurrah .. if you dont like someones point ...then start name calling or tell them to grow up.. how childish ..

I always thought debate was healthy .. but obviously I got that one wrong .. but there again when some hide behind their keyboard, then it descends in to childish tittle tattle

there again where is the moderation when its needed?

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By in United States,

I've said this several times in various forums, but I'll repeat it here because I'd really like to get some momentum behind this idea. IMO there should be no 'exclusives', just 'sneak previews'. Take, for instance, this SDCC. They announced the Riddler Chase set, due out next January I think. Of course from a fig standpoint, the real news in this set is the inclusion of the Flash, as we've either already got the Batman and Riddler figs, or at most they're minor variants on previous incarnations. Anyway, what if the SDCC giveaway was the Flash fig. Think of the parties involved:

--LEGO would gain, because this would simply increase the buzz on the convention floor about the new set, and probably give more positive free press to the set announcement.
--SDCC attendees would gain, because they would have the cool factor of being the first ones to have the fig by several months
--SDCC attendees would also gain because it would surely diminish some of the hassle around the LEGO booth and improve the con, more on this in a moment
--Non-SDCC attendees would gain, because they're eventually going to get this fig if they want it, so there will be no more hue and cry over the fact that we can't get, oh, I don't know, the GREEN LANTERN and PHOENIX, just to name two off the top of my head.
--Those seeking to make money off of selling exclusives on eBay would lose, because no one is going to pay a huge markup for a fig they could get in six months. Sure, there will be some markup - see, for instance, the occasional eBay auctions of figs that have snuck off the factory floor months before a set is released - but it's not going to be huge. BTW, I'm not really faulting those people. If I were at a con, and by luck got a little hunk of plastic that I could then sell for $1500, I'd do it. I love my LEGO, but I love my kids a lot more, and I could put that money in their college savings account, or the mortgage, or something.

Since there would not be this huge advantage to be gained by getting a hold of an exclusive, this would greatly diminish the hassle around the LEGO booth. Only those really interested in LEGO would be trying to get them, as opposed to anyone who realizes the potential profit, so there wouldn't be huge crowds around the booth, cutting in lines, accusations of cheating, etc. You wouldn't have boards like this one, FBTB, etc full of people arguing about these giveaways. I would see this as a huge win for everyone (except, of course, those couple hundred people who won't get the eBay windfall).

If they simply must have exclusives, I do wish they would either go with incredibly minor characters, or very slight variations on existing figs. I don't see huge complaints, for instance, about the Spidey fig from SDCC. I haven't seen a comparison - what are the differences from existing versions of Spidey?

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By in United States,

Does everyone remember the good old days when chrome C-3po was the biggest of our worries?......simpler times.

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By in United Kingdom,

Lego's strategy was fine and good. Kids should be at the end of their promotions, not adults.

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By in United States,

A couple of general responses to what I've been seeing on this thread:

A few have applauded LEGO for rigging the event in favor of children. Seriously? Yes, children are (and should be) the focus here, but no company should resort to deceptive tactics for that, especially one with as solid and trustworthy a reputation as TLG. If the event is aimed at children, then advertise it as such; if it's a raffle, then run it like a raffle.

Was the event at SDCC run poorly? By all accounts, yes. Was the giveaway rigged? I don't think so, and the FBTB article is only accusation, with no real basis of evidence. Besides, if they were to rig the event, they would have had it streamlined so well so as not to call attention to it. They wouldn't bung everything up the first day and then try and pull the wool over peoples eyes, once everyone was watching. Think about it: If they had been truly rigging it, it would have been much better organized.

Lastly, a lot of posters have claimed that the kids should have gotten the exclusives because kids don't turn around and scalp things on eBay. Guess what? If my kid got an Azog figure, and wanted to keep it, I would say, "look son. You can keep this ugly little figure that scared the heck out of you in the Hobbit movie, or we can sell him and make so much money that I will buy you every single Hobbit set...in fact I'll buy you two of each. And you can still help Daddy make rent this month. Whaddya say?"

What kid would turn down a mountain of LEGO, preferring to keep one figure instead? Kids may not be scalpers, but their parents sure are, and know a good deal when they see one. No kid would cherish that kind of a minifig the same way they would cherish the tons of LEGO their parents could score in exchange.

With so short an exclusive supply, demand is going to create an exorbitant price in the secondary market, no matter who the items are originally given to. So you weren't able to get one yourself? So sorry, better luck next time.

And when you get one, turn around, sell it, then blow it all on more LEGO. And rent.

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By in United States,

Oh, and ditto on figura's post above, that is hilarious!

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By in United Kingdom,

Seriously, still no fact behind this at all? I would think it wise for brickset to rename the article with a great big ?

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By in United States,

I agree with cheshirecat. This seems rather misleading and irresponsible to me. It does a disservice to LEGO, Brickset, and Brickset users to perpetuate this unsubstaniated speculation. Especially since this appears to be little more than a case of sour grapes.

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By in United States,

This rumor is completely false. I was there on Thursday, got a ticket before 11:30, and went back to the booth after 4PM to see if I won (I didn't, and wasn't aware of online option to check). They clearly had the winning ranges of numbers posted, not just specific pick and choose numbers, so for instance everybody in the range of say ticket# 900-950 won. Each range was no smaller than 25 and no bigger than 50. So how can anyone say this was rigged to only give kids winning tickets??

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By in United States,

This reminds me of how baseball card collecting was killed. Collectors can't collect, so what's the point?

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By in United Kingdom,

The comments have reached bun fight level, I haven't seen this since that Simpsons article :)

The best irony is the complaints of the article and website for filling in a 'slow news day'. Such comments must come from the commentator experiencing a slow day in general if you have to comment on an article you that's not for you or to your liking? ...bizarre.

I agree with fuelbreak... IF this rumour were true. Plus imagination and some bricks can make what a return ticket to San Diego, Comic Con entry and hotel bill will never buy: your own creation. This should be so much more highly valued.

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By in United Kingdom,

Very rare I log on to post comments, but this one seems to be a hot topic to say the least.

I think that there will always be a premium for rare items if there is a market for them, and this is no exception. To illustrate this, until the arrival of the offspring, I played a CCG (magic the gathering) pretty much from the outset. Some of the cards from older sets command a higher price as they are simply better at what they do than cards printed since, and they give you an advantage when playing (classic example being a Black Lotus, $2000 and upwards) but sometimes people will pay simply for the rarity to "pimp" their deck. A card by the name of Birds of Paradise was in the first editions and many others since, all of which do exactly the same thing, but some are simply rarer than others due to smaller production runs in the early days:

http://sales.starcitygames.com/search.php?substring=Birds+of+Paradise&t_all=All&start_date=2010-01-29&end_date=2012-04-22&order_1=finish&limit=25&action=Show%2BDecks&card_qty[1]=1&auto=Y

Simply down to scarcity, you can buy a card with exactly the same functionality for $2.50 all the way up to $500 for one from the first edition. Crazy... Briefly back on topic, if you want an Azog but don't want to sell a kidney to get one, wait a couple of months and get a white one - Good look finding him in the Hobbit if you re-read it by the way ; )

The initial rarity/overpowered nature of the CCG cards was down to the fact the game's designer never imagined anyone would ever buy so many cards and put together finely tuned decks, or that competitions would emerge with large cash prizes, and subsequent editions had their power toned down a little.

Now, fast forward a few years and the game was bought out by Hasbro. Over the last few years, there have been more sets released and various mechanics introduced to encourage people to buy more cards (such as foil cards, extra rare cards, and a set consisting solely of reprints of popular cards, which had a higher rrp and most retailers charged even more.) These money making schemes were one of the reasons I actually stopped playing.

Now the closest that lego have come to this is series 10 and Mr Gold, but unless you are a minifig completist, you can just buy a few and have fun. Sets such as the modulars are out of pocket money price range, but so far, in terms of price per element and the fact the runs will tend to be lower than mainstream sets (increasing cost per unit to design and produce) the "big" sets aren't too bad for what you get.

For a little perspective, I was always a fan of lego as a kid and was in the target age range (well, at the lower end) when technics launched. I did an AFOL thing several years back, buying a series of big technics sets, including the "supercar" and early pneumatics and after a while, donated them all to the local children's hospital. In theory, I lost many quids, but I had fun building and rebuilding them, so such is life. After digging some old (original) space sets out of the inlaws' loft, I found my missus the instructions so we could rebuild for a laugh (she was also a big fan as a kid.) Not too long after, I bought one of the city advent calendars and the year following, bought us cafe corner and the market for christmas as the former looked eerily like the hotel we'd booked to stay at in Paris for our wedding anniversary. Still got the boxes and instructions, so great stuff. Have nabbed all the other modulars since, plus the big fixed crane but small people have led to a build backlog. I remember picking up a UCS falcon in TrU and thinking wow, this is awesome, but balked at the price and wondering whether such a model was an idea in a house with several cats at that point!

Anyway, I don't regret not buying the Falcon, and I don't gloat about the early modulars - the space you'd need (let alone the £££) to be a lego completist would be out of reach of most people, so we just have fun with what we have and don't chase crazy sets (although I confess we've paid prolly original RRP for second hand bits of Duplo w

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By in United Kingdom,

we thought the offsring would like - I'm looking at you Dino Valley and you giant Duplo shark!) Similarly I don't regret not buying even more CCG cards back in the day so I could sell them and buy a GT-R (although if I take my time selling what I have and get near market value, it should cover an MPV for when our faithful old Clio finally buys the farm, hopefully MANY years from now.)

At the end of the day, lego is primarily designed for kids, so even if this allegation (and it seems to be that at best) is right, who cares if kids were more likely to get a freebie. It's purely demand for a scarce item that has created a secondary market for this sort of thing - more hysteria will only drive the prices of the next similar thing higher. Lego won't make any £££ out of the resales, nor sell any more sets on the back of it. There might be a tiny splash in the press, but nothing compared to a 1:1 scale X-wing or the regular pieces the Beeb do on big cons.

In short, life's too short to worry about this sort of stuff, if there was ever anything to define first world proble, this is it. Calm down, enjoy building and get on with life.

Cheers folks.

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By in United States,

"What kid would turn down a mountain of LEGO, preferring to keep one figure instead?"

My son. We both decided we would much rather keep our Mr. Gold then sell him. It was never a question for me, and for him it took about 2 minutes to decide for sure.

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By in United States,

Wow I never realized how childish many of you are.

@Charger113 I completely agree with you, everyone here acts like children. If there would be 50,000 of them nothing would be so special. Instead you would have the same people complaining that they made too many of these and that they should have made 25,000 for that they wouldn't be exclusive.

Lego just wanted them to go to kids that would PLAY with them, not put them on display or sell them on ebay. I'm pretty sure adults just told their kids that they could buy much more lego. I'm a fourteen year old, yet do you see me complain about figures being exclusive? No. Instead, I am happy for the kids who won these figures, for that they will play with them with their sets, just like how lego wanted them to. The limited amount of the figures is what makes them special, hence the term "exclusive figures"

Lego had the right idea, but they just did the wrong thing. Instead, like other people here have mentioned, should have had the raffle to be exclusively for kids. Who knows, maybe they will learn next year.


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By in United States,

@ Darth Nader Thank you for understanding. I honestly almost quit this community because of some of the reactions to this. You are 14 years old and your acting more like an adult then some other members here.

I just read part three of the sore losers "proof" here: http://www.fbtb.net/2013/07/31/sdcc-marvel-and-dc-minifigure-giveaways-how-lego-gamed-the-system-part-3/#more-23086

It is broken down into five points which I will now destroy.

"1. The winning numbers were known before the drawing took place." None of this guys articles has solid proof of this. Just assumptions and guesses along with rumors. Even if it was true and there was solid evidence that the numbers were picked before hand there is no evidence that anyone picked out any winning tickets. It all is assumption and you know what they say about assuming things...

"2. Everyone who won a minifigure on Saturday got their ticket from the same person.*" So all the friends this guy knows are children right? Because according to his article only children won the majority of figures. So if he just admitted he knows a large amount of adults who apparently all got their tickets from the same guy, does that not just say that adults stood in line and won? So where is the argument again? Also as he said it only counts for 20-25 figures out of how many hundreds or more were give out that day. Bit of a reach to say EVERYONE got winning tickets with such a limited pool.

"3. You couldn’t pick your ticket from your choice of people or tickets." He attaches a story that I am sure only happened to him. Have you ever been to a hand out event? Do you really want to slow down the process of the line by letting people pick and choose who they get a free ticket from?

"4. The guy on the right handled his tickets very suspiciously." lol wut? If I was handing out free things that everyone wanted I would be protective of what I was handing out to. Looking suspicious is apparently now proof in this guys eyes enough to try to tarnish TLG rep. I guess TLG must have been carrying skittles and Ice tea.

"5. The employees kept mentioning how “random” the raffle was." has this dude ever been out of his basement long enough to interact with other humans? I work retail. I could say something to one customer, have another standing right next to me, and still have to repeat myself. I am sure people kept asking about how the raffle was done and how to win. The answer constantly would be that is a raffle that is random.

All in all some people need to get over themselves.

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By in United States,

@Charger113,

tell me to grow up? nice buddy. I talk about how the marketing of Lego has changed the feel of the product, making it less interesting, and all you see is someone complaining that they did not get a minifigure? I'm buying less because the people I meet in the aisles at stores are not the same. The community feels different now, and the feel of being a part of a community that just built stuff, instead of trying to complete sets has shifted.

How rare is it to find a product that one can enjoy as a child and as an adult, without the greed of rarity filling the conversations? Lego was this product, and that aspect has changed. This is why I've spent far less. As a person who wants to enjoy and be part of a community, one searches for the communities that offer not just a product, but also a certain personality.

With change in market strategies, I and many others who were here before this specific rarity action took hold at TLG will walk away. If I still had room, I'd go back to gardening... but can't afford that much land where I currently live.

You see people complaining they can't get a minifigure, and I hear people complaining because TLG has changed the personality of the product at a social level. Read what I wrote as an "I can't get so I'm going to stop shopping," but the truth is it is more like what @Darth Nader just stated, I too am happy that kids will play with these figures. I just wish TLG wasn't going down this road at all. "Exclusive" means "Excluded, and to me a happy toy that can traverse childhood into adulthood is much greater a product without exclusions (or massive-worldwide exclusions).

The real question is why are so many people angry. Yes, some are mad because they can't complete their collections. Others are mad because their concept of this "childs" toy has been shifted through changes in corporate marketing strategies... strategies which create greater profits for the company, but also change the public mindset of the toy.

Btw, tomorrow I'm off to search Goodwill type stores for Lego in bulk. Why? I miss grab bags. They were fun. Lots of bricks, rarely any figures, but a fun surprise as to what is inside of them. Limiting purchase cuz I can't get a minifigure? pshhh. limiting purchase due to Lego changing the direction of the brand with exclusionary minifigs... that's all.

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By in United States,

The only thing that I got from the articles and the posts here was that it was kind of unfair for the people wasting their time in line if they had no chance of winning anything.... I don't care about any of this stuff because I know that 1/2 of the stuff from SDCC will be scalped anyways regardless of who wins it whether it is a child or adult... Kids aren't stupid, they know how to use computers and see the value items... I was at Steel City Con last weekend and 2 kids about 10 or 11 years old asked me if I had any Mr Gold figures and I said "No, do you?" and the one kid said "I wish that I did because they are worth like $500"

And I cannot be the only one who's mind is completely blown that one person could be "Lucky" enough to get 6 figures...

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By in United States,

@ Krklint What made me truly angry at your argument was when you mentioned not spending money because some people can't get a figure and hoping that TLG changes because of your money. That is what your entire argument boiled down to. It came off as elitist and entitled. That is something that is plaguing this community. The $5000 they might lose from you was easily regained by all the parents and adults who are selling their exclusive figures on Ebay to buy more Lego. Heck when a friend of mine found a Mr. Gold he sold it and finally got the Death Star. That is a sale that never would have happened had there not been an exclusive figure.

They created business where there was not before by handing things out for free. They create business and buzz by creating exclusives.

Your idea of: "So I ask TLG this, is is possible to do variations of the free give-aways that can be purchased online, by anyone? Demand and interest exists. Profit can be made, and exclusivity will remain. In the end, a good number of fans now in the Lego universe are completists ... they just want to complete their sets." does not work.

For one, TLG cannot sell individual figures. I can't believe I have to keep saying that here. You think people would get that by now. Two, your asking TLG to ask parents to spend more money monthly just to get the characters their child wants. Your asking the AFOL's to have to spend $50 this month $75 the next month $50 in just star wars month in and out just to get "exclusive" figures. This Strategy would be horrible and anyone who knows anything about marketing would be able to see why. People would simply be burned out. Most parents buy Lego four-Six times a year. Birthdays, holiday, graduations, and good deeds are usually why a child is getting something.

Now Imagine TLG publishing in their catalog, posting on their website, and hanging signs up in their stores for "give away" Spiderman with $50 purchase this month next month Padme with a purchase of $75 in star wars. Every single month another figure, instead of what they currently do with polybags like friends ice cream stand, hot dog stand, and the black hero factory brain. The strain on the Wallets would be to much for most. Not only that but the Ebayers would charge outrageous prices for just a figure to people who want it but could not spend the $75 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lego-Super-Heroes-Man-of-Steel-Exclusive-Jor-El-Minifigure-5001623-NEW-NISB-/181153087547?pt=Building_Toys_US&hash=item2a2d90c03b).

Instead what TLG did was the brilliant. There isn't a single thing on their websites about these figures, There is no catalogs pictures, nothing in their calenders. It is like the don't exist. Why? Simple. why announce to the whole world that one city in California hand a comic convention where these four exclusives would be free. That would cause wide spread heart ache to children, parents and adults who don't go on fan sites to see TLG related news.

Guess what! The larger majority of parents, children and adults are oblivious that these four figures even exist.

Lego created positive buzz to the winners of the figures, generated sales, and kept the majority of their customer base in the dark all at the same time. That is an achievement.

Oh and If anything. I would bet that the way TLG is going to make all of these figures or variants of each and they will be in the next big release of sets. Doing that out of nowhere would make re sellers think twice before trying to stock up on these exclusives and kill the after market overnight in one swoop.

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By in United States,

Can we close this and move the arguments to the forums? This is getting (gotten) out of hand...

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By in Indonesia,

all these angers, these frustrations, these arguments, these debates, these accusation.....

all caused by lego starting to give "Exclusive Minifig"

so whose fault is this at the first place?

don't like how lego marketing their product? well, just stop buying their products then.
I wonder if these "exclusive minifig" marketing ploy could successfully bring in a lot of new customers or lego will losing several of their loyal customers.

peace out

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By in United Kingdom,

*yawn* I kept myself interested in this all a day longer than most by wading in and having fun throwing some buns.
Cap'n Rex, keep writing those reviews! Push this tired old dog off the homepage so it can rest in peace! ;)

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