LEGO Offers Box of Bricks for Adults

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Architecture Studio

I wasn't going to cover this in the news because, well, it's old news now, but a lot of people have emailed asking why I haven't mentioned it, so here goes...

It seems that the Architecture Studio 21050 is being marketed at adults and the mainstream media is running stories on it, such as this one on ABC News. Ace at FBTB has written a great review and caperberry's New Elementary blog takes a look at the parts in it.

It's available at Barnes and Noble in the USA already and will, apparently, be available in brand stores and shop.LEGO.com from tomorrow.

33 comments on this article

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By in New Zealand,

Any idea of the inventory/price?

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By in United Kingdom,

Tricky Brick I think there's 1210 pieces but I have no idea on the price.

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By in United States,

retail in USA is $149.99

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By in United Kingdom,

I mailed UK customer services about this, asking if a) it would be available in the UK, and b) if not, could I order from Lego USA?

They said (I'm paraphrasing)

a) 'Who knows? It's a secret? Maybe we will and maybe we won't.
b) No.

It is, however, showing on Amazon.com, and I've successfully bought stuff from there before, so if it doesn't show up in the UK fairly soon, I'll swallow some customs charges and try and get one shipped over.

Cos I NEEDS it!

;o)

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By in United States,

^ Thanks for checking that out, certainly it's not listed at shop.LEGO.com in the UK at the moment as you've no doubt found.

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By in Poland,

I got my answer from CS a few days ago, and they denied rumors of further distribution, and said that it won't be available outside USA. Bad luck.

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By in United Kingdom,

Are all the bricks white? Where's the fun in that?

C'mon Lego, announce the new modular house already!

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By in Singapore,

...a box of white bricks? Why?

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By in Poland,

The point is... That the set teach and developes your building skills with architecture. It is very good that bricks comes in one colour (+transparent clear for windows) 'cause it's all about the shape of your creation. It is like creating the sculpture. The main element in this set are not bricks but the book. : ]

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By in United States,

Looks like I'm going to need it. I got to stock up on white and clear parts

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By in Slovakia,

150 USD is simply TOO MUCH for such a set!

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By in United Kingdom,

More importantly, why do Americans pluralise "Lego"?

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By in United States,

All bricks are either White or clear (transparent, no color). There were also no hinges or gears.
No parts for doors, but plenty of clear windows and bricks.

I think that this is intended for Architects to mock up their building in a scene. Like the way that the current Architecture sets like Sydney-Opera and Taj Mahal are.

The people at the Barnes & Nobel demo reported a low brick price. But they quoted me at less than 10 cents a piece, so maybe "they" were wrong. $150/1210pieces is about 12 cents a piece.

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By in United States,

I like this but it is a tad bit expensive. I might wait for a sale to pick it up.

@billydeewilliams. We also buy boxes of Kleenexs, drive Fords or Chevroles, wear Nikes. Pluralizing the company name is an easy way to refer to all of the company's products. Grammatically, it is just as bad to refer to the company name alone. For example, you do not wear Nike or drive Ford so you should also not build with Lego. Instead you should wear Nike shoes, drive Ford vehicles, and build with Lego bricks.

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By in United Kingdom,

@picopirate: There's a difference. As far as I'm aware, or, rather, as far as I have noticed, only Americans infer that a single Lego brick is "a Lego". I'm genuinely interested to know if that was the company's intention or how it came about.

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By in United States,

@ billydeewilliams
"More importantly, why do Americans pluralise "Lego"?"

The bonus features of the Lego Batman movie include a stop motion animator teaching some kids about what he does. He shows them his sets, how to operate the camera, and lets them film a short scene. At one point he explains to them that they should not add an s when pluralizing Lego. I don't know exactly how the kids got into the video but I assume they are smart and Lego fans- they had no idea what he was talking about.

I don't think most Americans have any idea that adding an "s" to Lego is incorrect. I have been a Lego fan for 30 years and I only learned the proper plural form of Lego about a year ago. It's culturally ingrained at this point and I'm not sure that we can overcome it. Unless TLG launches a massive public awareness campaign most people will never be aware of the problem.

Here is my question, why is it such a problem? A lot of Americans constantly slaughter the English language. Isn't the rest of the world used to this by now?

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By in United Kingdom,

I guess we live in hope that one day Americans will see that sentences like "I could care less what you think" don't quite convey the intended meaning.

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By in United States,

I would think LEGO marketing is happy that Americans consider the company name to be synonymous with its major product. Brand loyalty has a big effect in purchasing choices, and if people think "LEGO" when they think of brick-based construction toys, that surely pays off in higher sales for LEGO products. I am sure TLG is in no hurry to disabuse Americans of whatever lingual discrepancies we display as long as we keep opening our wallets to buy products. The customer is, after all, always right.

That being said, I saw this set at Barnes & Noble the other day. It's a pretty high price per piece but is interesting nonetheless. The Architecture sets as a whole are not my favorite, but if I can find this set at a discount I will consider buying it. There are so many other great sets coming out yet this year that it's hard to justify spending so much on this one.

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By in United States,

Actually, LEGO marketing tries very hard to make sure that Americans say LEGO bricks, but its just not going to work. It is way, way too ingrained in the American culture at this point. I was calling it LEGOs for most of my life and only learned when I started working at LEGOLAND that I was doing it "wrong."

I was careful to make sure that I did it "right" while I worked for them, but now I don't care. I don't work for the company, I give them lots of free press through my blog, participation at LEGO Conventions and through my LEGO LUG. So, sometimes I call it LEGO bricks, sometimes LEGOs.

As for the set, since I helped run the one near me, I know what's in the box and I'm not impressed. From what I've heard, the book is the most important part, but that was the only thing I didn't get to see.

I did write up about the event on my blog here:
http://modelbuildingsecrets.wordpress.com/2013/07/27/barnes-and-noble-lego-architecture-building-event/

Being as I have a huge collection, there is very little in this set that I need or want. There are no special pieces, and I don't need a ton of white parts at the moment.

If it went down in price, sure, I'd probably pick up a box. But not for $150.

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By in United States,

lego for ADULTS?!?! WTF?!?! what's next? lego for arthritic Senior Citizens: White Duplo blocks

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By in United States,

Why does every "special" Lego set have to cost $100 + these days? I guess I'm too poor to be an AFOL. I wish Lego would come out with cheaper sets like this with one color of elements in them, available in different colors. And before you smarty-pants out there suggest I use pick a brick or Bricklink, I want to be able to walk into Wal-Mart and be able to buy them.

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By in Canada,

I don't know, I almost put the people who buy the Lego Architecture mini models on the same level as the people who pay inflated ebay prices on exclusive minifigures; both groups seem to have more money than brains, or perhaps, an empty cubicle at work in dire need of crapola to fill the empty spaces. I'm not going to throw around insults, so instead I'll let the ArchitectureStudio set do all the talking, and gladly have it demonstrate just how little Lego actually cares about the people who buy these models. They're stupid and expensive... oops, there goes another insult!

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By in United States,

So in other words, modern Modulex

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By in United States,

I'll just pay $30 on Craigslist or Gumtree.

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By in United States,

It's over priced, for mostly basic parts, it should only be about $60. But if there are numerous manuals teaching about architecture, it would be worth the price

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By in Canada,

Being an adult really isn't all it's cracked up to be.

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By in United States,

@ billydeewilliams
"More importantly, why do Americans pluralise "Lego"?"

I don't know. Why do folks from the UK have bad tooth.......let me plural that for you....teeth? ;)

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By in United States,

And of course, check Amazon as always to add to mwgjordan's comment about finding sales on Amazon.

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By in United Kingdom,

We have bad teeth because we have Free Universal Healthcare. When it's not costing you directly, you don't bother using it so much :)

I'd like to see a full review of the booklet included, because the listed price, for basic bricks in only 2 standard colours, seems awfully steep. No special moulds, no special colours, no stickers or transfers, and no licence mark-up?

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By in Bolivia,

Isn't it just a bunch of white bricks?

I sort of wish they were gray or tan. White is a bit bland.

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By in United States,

Bricklink is overpriced for sourcing lots of bricks.

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