Winter Review Deadline Approaching

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Cuusoo's Winter Review deadline is January 6th 12:00 A.M. GMT which is about 48 hours from this posting.

Currently five projects will be in the review:

Sherlock, Macross VF-1 Valkyrie, Legend of Zelda (#3): Iron Knuckle Encounter, Japanese Old Style Architecture, and The Adventure Time Project.

The BTTF - UCS DeLorean Time Machine has a shot of making the review if they can rustle together just 300 (now 50) more votes. Very possible if the Brickset readership is feeling generous today.

The LEGO Bird Project also has a chance of making the Winter Review but they need a little more than 500 votes to pull that off.

When the Time Machine does roll up to 10k, it will make room in the top three for the second oldest project on Cuusoo: Apollo 11 Lunar Mission, which just hit 7000 support with the help of space themed articles about the Mars Curiosity Cuusoo release.

39 comments on this article

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By in Canada,

I sincerely hope the Bird Project receives it's remaining votes in time for this review. It would be good to see some creative original thought added to the mix.

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By in Belgium,

I don't think any of those which allready gathered 10k votes will pass given the recent changes they've communicated.

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By in Spain,

Judging from those already in the review, I can't see them looking promising or hopeful dye to them being too obscure or difficult to receive licensing for. I suppose any with the best chance of this currently are the Japanese architecture and Zelda maybe seeing that there's been demand with the reaching of 10k.

If either two of the others get in, I can see them being strongly chosen over these especially with the BTTF tie in currently.

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By in United Kingdom,

Fingers crossed that a non-licensed creation prevails - there are more than enough licensed sets to spend our money on as it is; the LEGO birds are lovely and would do me just fine.

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By in United States,

The birds would be interesting, however I doubt Lego would accept it, because I don't really think it would appeal to kids, even though many AFOLs would probably really like it. I wouldn't be surprised if one was picked and the BTTF was put on hold, or the BTTF was picked and another put on hold, just because Lego knows they can get the license.

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By in United States,

The birds would be interesting, however I doubt Lego would accept it, because I don't really think it would appeal to kids, even though many AFOLs would probably really like it. I wouldn't be surprised if one was picked and the BTTF was put on hold, or the BTTF was picked and another put on hold, just because Lego knows they can get the license.

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By in United States,

While I would buy the heck out of a Zelda set (several times over, at that) I doubt they will be able to make it. I'm betting Nintendo possibly has licensed Zelda to someone else. It might be K'Nex, or it could be some Japanese figurine maker that makes toys that aren't sold here, but the license terms prevent them from being able to license a "figure" in the likeness of Link even in another market. This will be another long review waiting period, though.

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By in United States,

I really like the birds. They're a nice example of a different scale and style that can be done in Lego. And they're pretty.

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By in United States,

If the birds dont get 10,000. The only set I think would pass is the Japanese architecture set.
Isn't that Land Rover set still being considered?

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By in United Kingdom,

can't see any of those going any further - and, to me, that's no real loss

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By in United States,

I would love to be hopeful, but with the massive number of rejections they've made and the changes to guidelines recently, I just don't know what to think anymore.

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By in United States,

Supported the Delorean. 259 to go.

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By in United States,

^^@behemothjosh, (et al),

Actually, they didn't make any changes to the guidelines recently... The guidelines have been firmly written for about a year, and they've just started to officially enforce what had already been written.

I definitely think that they will be ready to wrap up the Beta Phase and finally "Go Live" in 2015, and so they need to have at least one full calendar year with everyone following a clear set of rules first.

Once the site does officially "Go Live", they will start advertising it actively, so there will be lots more fans visiting and voting, so it will speed up dramatically... It'll be much faster, and with fewer rejections! =D

And that will be way more fun! I think that is their overarching plan.....!

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By in United States,

For once I'm not biting my nails on the review. I am interested in the Land Rover that was awaiting further review last time and the Apollo 11 LEM that should make next review, but nothing here is a must have for me.

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By in United States,

^^@therealindy

They will probably raise the amount of supporters needed to pass a project once the site leaves its beta stage, so it may actually take longer to get a "good" project to pass.

Some of these sets look great, but I do not think many of them can be sold as sets.

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By in United States,

@ m.w.449

I concur with your assessment. Just like going Global meant 10,000 instead of 1,000 there is no reason to assume that 10,000 will still be the target number when Lego moves out of Beta.

It is really up to Lego how fast they want projects to mature.

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By in United States,

I had been a big defender of CUUSOO, but the draconian new rules and/or enforcement of rules, depending how you see it, has pushed me into the critic camp. There are a bunch of great projects in here but the most original ones, birds and Japanese architecture, are themes rather than sets and so will get dumped on a technicality. The Zelda project guy is insisting a new mold is necessary and not knuckling under to CUUSOO's new killjoy approach, and good for him to stick to his guns, but that will also be disqualified as a result. Adventure Time guy dumbed down his project to meet the requirements. Way to stick a fork in the creative process, TLG. I suspect this is not a problem with the CUUSOO people per se, it must be higher-ups who are iffy on the whole concept anyway and intend to shorten the leash until it chokes to death. That's my theory. It was fun while the free-wheeling phase lasted.

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By in United States,

@ninjagoyo, there was nothing in CuuSoo's recent rules changes that were unexpected, unexplained or draconian. The fact that most of them had to be set in stone in this manner was simply because so many people refused to listen. Or assumed that the guidelines only applied to other people. CuuSoo has been saying "no themes" for a long time now. Does it restrict artistic freedom or the "creative process"? Surely. But working within the boundaries of what can actually be made is an equally important part of the true creative process. The system is about making a legitimate project proposal. Not dreaming the biggest dream you can. Learning to restrict, refine and review are just as important skill sets as being able to think up a really awesome MOC.

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By in United States,

@therealindy

Actually, they made lots of changes to the guidelines recently (December 12th 2013) that include: no mascots, no new parts, and no themes.

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By in United States,

Personally I'd like to see cuusoo end. just today I saw that in the past week someone added a snow speeder that looked very much like the official sets and a x-wing that looks very close to the new planet replacement line. The only set I wanted was the bttf DeLorean but it looks like crap compared to the one that was voted on. There has only been a few original ideas and most have not been that good in my opinion.

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By in United States,

^ I'm with you, however I feel like it was more of a suggestion box idea more than actual product development site. I still have my fingers crossed for the Japanese Architecture project.

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By in United States,

@behemothjosh, I think what Lindy was getting at was most of the changes were not really anything new. They just codified them and started enforcing them at the proposal level rather than at the point of review. We had long known that theme proposals would not pass review. We long new that set specific part requests would fail review etc. the only really big changes were no new individual part proposals, which while it wiped out a previous category of submission, is really not that unexpected once you do the math and think through what is involved in part design and testing. While the no mascots or corporate logos could be technically viewed as a new rule, it is once again an unsurprising one. (Why would Lego waste production capital to provide free brand advertising for an unrelated company?) basically all the new rules did was shift the known and discovered clear and unequivocal review failure points from the end of the review process to the beginning of the proposal process. Thus streamlining the system. I don't know about you, but I think its a major improvement that they do not have to delay reviews for months while they fully re evaluate the 17th Zelda proposal that has the same glaring failure point as the first 16.

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By in United States,

@Faefrost

While I agree with you that we all guessed on our own that new parts, new themes, and mascots may not make it, that is quite a bit different then what therealindy stated that "The guidelines have been firmly written for about a year". Nowhere where these guidelines firmly written. In fact, they even stated that new part ideas and theme ideas were welcome up til this December of 2013. And yes, i do think its more realistic what they've stated now.

And along those lines of these things we can all probably come to a conclusion about on our own, I think they should create guidelines that say no expanding on current IP specific themes. This would remove the myriads of batman, iron man, star wars, chima, etc... projects we see. I think we all know that none of those will pass review either.

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By in United States,

^@behemothjosh, (et al),

They post their guidelines on their Official Blog, and most of the issues have been up there for more than several months now. I remember reading them with a highlighter pen before I started designing my projects back in April.

But you are definitely right that the "no mascots" rule is new, and the "no part proposals" rule is a reversal.

And you are totally right that they should be calling everyone's attention to the guidelines more, because even now, it's very easy for people to not even realize that they are there at all, and waste their time on a "doomed project"! =(

We should really write to them and urge them to call attention to the rules more visibly now...!

"The Real Indy"

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By in United States,

Or, alternatively, they should maintain the original spirit of CUUSOO, and focus on it as a vehicle for the fans/customers to express what they actually want, not what TLG allows them to want.

As innovative and praiseworthy and risk-taking as the initial CUUSOO effort was, it has been extremely watered-down and "corporatized" at this point. I think that is shortsighted on TLG's part, and I doubt I am the only one. I suspect that lawyers and accounts have been at work in a big way on this. Of course, TLG must consider its legal and financial position, but they then run the risk of both stifling the novel access to the fan mind, and generating backlash by being seen as taking away the punchbowl just when the party gets going.

All the people who hated CUUSOO all along surely love this development, those who couldn't stand that people would "waste their time on doomed projects." Since when is making stuff you love out of LEGO and wishing for it to be made official ever a waste of time? Someday the Star Trek and Dr Who licenses to other toy companies will expire, and maybe LEGO will recall the countless CUUSOO projects they had to yank on those franchises, and consider acquiring them... I say this as a fan of neither franchise, just an observation that "never is a long time."

Maybe instead of running all the Zelda projects past the lawyers and accountants to veto, somebody at HQ will actually slap themselves on the forehead and say, "Guys! Are we stupid? This is going to be huge! Get out there and get the deal done! Lawyers, go secure the frickin rights! Accountants, make the numbers work even if we have to do a new mold! Make yourselves useful!" CUUSOO is visionary, but it seems to be suffering from progressive glaucoma at the moment. Some executive needs to put on the right pair of glasses and restore the vision. Again, I have no personal interest in Zelda whatsoever, I have never played a Zelda game in my life. If TLG can't figure out by now that they need to take this uprising from their fanbase seriously, what is wrong with them?

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By in United States,

I'm more than happy to support cuusoo, but after seeing the 100th iron man hall of armor, or a car that looks like a set that lego made a few years ago only in a different color, or in a slightly different way I get tired of looking. I think someone should review the set before it gets posted, and if it's another Batman tumbler politely reject it before it can get voted on so that only new ideas make it. I have no problem if someone makes a set off a movie or TV show like the a team, but I think that if someone comes up with an iceman/silver surfer set that should get rejected because Lego already has the marvel license.

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By in Norway,

I did my part and voted. Fingers crossed for The Bird project

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By in United Kingdom,

I think too many people use Cuusoo as a place to display MOCs, not showcase genuine potential sets.

Anyone who doesn't appreciate there are many barriers to getting licensed sets going are kidding themselves. Perhaps Minecraft has set unreasonable expectations.

I hope Birds succeeds. It's just the sort of thing I think Cuusoo is for.

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By in United States,

It'll be intriguing to see what passes review…

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By in United States,

I really want the Sherlock set, even though I've never watched one episode of that show in my life, I just think the rooms look REALLY cool.

If not that, I would want the bird project. And, @ alexfig8, I think it would appear to kids, as some may want a pet they can "take care of", if their parents don't want a REAL pet. And, some may just like birds, like me.

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By in United States,

Can somebody please help me?

I like the Japanese buildings, but how would they make it a set? What building would they include? Wouldn't the price be super high?

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By in United States,

Here's to Sherlock and Adventure Time! *toasts*

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By in United States,

@popo123 I would love a Sherlock set. Sadly I think this one gets veto'd on the first day of review, for the same reasons as the Winchester and the Firefly project. Sherlock is too dark and violent for the brand fit. It further faces the complication of being a licensed version of what is otherwise a public domain IP.

The Macross Vakyrie makes me cry because it faces some really complicated and high licensing hurdles completely independent of the project CuuSoo and TLG. The IP rights are so split, so complicated and so horribly fought over in courts for 30 years that there really isn't a single clear path for a worldwise license. I can forgive Lego for not wanting to step into that mess no matter how badly I want that mech.

The Zelda set has the same exact issue as the past few rejections. Even getting past that Nintendo is notoriously weird and expensive to work with regarding licenses. This assumes that the license is even available. Plus the quantifiable embedded fan base is much shallower than TLG normally likes.

Japanese buildings and Adventure Time both have a good chance.

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By in United States,

They could do a Sherlock set, but just not base it off the show. In the US, a judge just ruled that any Sherlock Holmes stories prior to the 30s were in the public domain. So they could make a generic Sherlock Holmes set without having to pay any royalties.

And the new clarified rules stopping peoples creativity? I'm sorry, have all of the MOC sites suddenly vanished? When you buy bricks do you now have to sign a license that says you can only build a set that matches the instructions? You are still free to build whatever you want, TLG is simply saying that they're not got to make custom sets for each and everything that reaches 10000 votes just because a lot of people like it. They are a business, and unless the numbers are there, forget it. Having to get a license for non-original things cuts into their net profit, and that's even if the license is available.

The only thing the clarified rules did was get rid of the crap that was on CUUSOO.

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By in United States,

The only sets I would get out of these are Legend of Zelda and POSSIBLY Adventure Time.

Speaking of CUUSOO, on New Year's Eve I got 500 supporters on Club Penguin: Town Center after exactly 11 months. I bet I will have 1,000 by the end of this year. I am revealing a big update to the project tomorrow. Check it out, and wish me luck!

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By in United States,

Adventure Time might be possible. LEGO and Cartoon Network is working together with themes like TMNT, Mixels, Chima, etc.

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By in United States,

@ legomaniac

TMNT is a Nick show, at least now it is.

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By in United States,

^ your right. Thought it is Nick. There was a CN series in 2003-09

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By in United States,

Nick outright owns TMNT now. But TLG does have a fantastic relationship with CN as well. Ninjago, Chima, Yoda Chronicles, etc. So an Adventure Time license might not be a stretch. I would just be surprised if either party would want to do it as a limited project for CuuSoo. CN might prefer a full blown theme. Heck they may have already had discussions about it, in which case the CuuSoo project probably fails review over a conflict.

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