• Brandenburg Gate

    Overall rating
    Building experience
    Parts
    Playability
    Value for money

    The Colors!

    Written by (AFOL) in Turkey,

    The colors are really beautiful, they go well together, the build was also very simple and fun
    The gate-like pieces big pieces are impressive

    The model is a pleasing display piece
    I normally build the Lego's, keep them in my room a bit, and store them in the attic, however this one is still in my room, with several other Architecture's

    0 out of 1 person thought this review was helpful.

  • Brandenburg Gate

    Overall rating
    Building experience
    Parts
    Playability
    Value for money

    Brandenberger Tor - Putting Berlin on the Lego Map

    Written by (AFOL , bronze-rated reviewer) in Poland,

    I picked this particular set, of all of the Architecture sets, because it's the only European set and because it's a place I've visited and happen to quite like. Plus, it's reasonably priced.

    Box/Instructions

    Classy. The box and instruction manual are in glossy black. It definitely feels "grown-up". Plus I loved that the instruction manual had bits of commentary/history about the Brandenburger Tor. I would love it if Lego did more of this, somehow, with regular sets.

    Parts

    If you need lots of beige pieces or sage-colored 1x1 slope bricks, you will rejoice.

    Minifigures

    El zilcho!

    The build

    I suppose, with architecture, there's got to be repetition. So, knowing this, I shouldn't have been surprised at the repetitious aspects of this set. In retrospect, this must be why TLG's Architecture series doesn't tend to have a large brick count. However, with the Architecture series the build isn't the point, the end result is the point.


    The completed model

    It is absurdly difficult to get all the sloped 1x1 sage bricks to line up. However, if it's done then I think the final thing looks great. I also definitely like how the Quadriga was done.

    Summary

    I think this looks great and since it's small and discrete and such a well-known landmark, it's "ok to have at work". I work at a fairly conservative place so it's great to have something, anything from Lego on my desk. The whole package is grown-up, or "Lego Professional". I'm looking forward to some other select Architectural sets from Lego to add to my at-work collection.

    7 out of 7 people thought this review was helpful.

  • Brandenburg Gate

    Overall rating
    Building experience
    Parts
    Playability
    Value for money

    A faithful dive into history...

    Written by (AFOL) in United States,

    Historically speaking, this is the oldest building yet to be recreated in the Architecture series, beating the White House by only one year. And much to the delight of my Lego cohorts across the pond, the first European piece. There are many pieces in Germany that had been unofficially nominated for the series, and many rejoiced to this Brandenburg Tor chosen and beautifully reproduced. I love this series, and biased though I may be, I doubt I'm alone in my approval of this set.

    Box/Instructions

    Like the rest of the series, the box and instructions feel a bit more sturdy and are really nice. The usual history and artist comments are found at the beginning and end of the instruction booklet, respectively. The political history surrounding the Brandenburg Gate is really interesting, and inspired lots of Wikipedia'ing.


    Parts

    This set contains a pretty decent variety of pieces a comes to about $.096 per piece. This outranks all sets in the Landmark series except for the White House.

    We're back to having mostly tan colored pieces. Surprised? Not for this series.

    The big winner here comes in the form of Sand Green 1x1x2/3 slope/roof tiles. There are 80 plus 2 spares! As of writing this, there were only 248 of those available on ALL of BrickLink. I imagine that will be changing soon after people start parting out this set.

    And true to the series, it comes with a Black 1x8 tile with the name of the set engraved on it. But UNlike the rest of the series, we get TWO of these! One in English and one in German. So cool. I have both of these attached to my set right now, one above the other.

    Minifigures

    None to speak of.

    The build

    Pretty straight forward, from bottom to top. After putting up the first few railings/columns, there's a brief period of working from the outside in, which is atypical of Lego, but nothing too challenging. While placing the 80 slope roof tiles, it was a big of a challenge to keep every as straight as my OCD requires. But nothing as mind numbing as the Farnsworth House. Just use some of the longer pieces as a straight edge and you'll be fine.

    Adam doesn't get too tricky this time around. There's some half-stepping on the roof, which is always satisfying to see. Everything comes together in the end very nicely.

    The completed model

    Very pretty. Not the most flattering way of putting it, but it's true. I use Sand Green to recreate oxidized copper in my own models, and I was actually excited to see it in an official set. My only pet peeve is that the two layers of slope roof tiles are not flush with each other, creating an overhang of 1/16 of an inch. As many MOC'ers know, clearing that 1/16" is not easy, and is sometimes more trouble than it's worth. Also, for lack of a convex roof piece, where the perpendicular roof slants meet is actually really satisfying to look at from above.

    I find myself picking it up and looking at it from all angles a lot. Imagining small people walking through the columns. Adam Reed Tucker is pretty minimalist in the amount of detailing in his sets, which is sometimes required when maintaining proportions at this scale in Lego. But what little detail there is room for becomes more striking.

    The Quadriga, the top statue, looks fine for being at such a tiny scale, but you'd never guess it was supposed to be 4 horses pulling a chariot if you hadn't known what is was ahead of time.

    Summary

    Though my excitement for this set is probably eclipsed for anyone who's actually seen this site in real life, I was very happy to see something that was A) Not a skyscraper and B) Not American. Variety is the spice of life, and the Landmark series had been dominated by skyscrapers at a scale that prohibited detail. This changed after the White House came out, followed by Rockefeller Center. This is a wonderful addition to the Architecture series as a whole, and a welcome departure from the style that we'd begun to be accustomed to. A building whose style was rooted in Athens, Greece. We can only hope more like this are to come.

    From the booklet: "The Quadriga, the four horsed chariot driven by Victoria, the winged goddess of victory...was recreated using "greebles"-the use of unintended parts to recreate another object in an abstract way." Seeing that word in print in an official set is a nice nod to the Lego community.

    Also, take a close look at the picture of the artist at the end of the booklet. The model Adam Reed Tucker is holding is a different color scheme than the final form. I'm sure opinions will vary, but I'm very happy he chose to darken everything by a shade and give us the Sand Green pieces, even if it meant having yet another slew of tan pieces.

    Overall, I'm very happy with this model. I hope Adam takes another look at Europe sometime soon. There's still a lot of excellent choices out there, and this is a great start.

    16 out of 16 people thought this review was helpful.