• EVO

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    Evo,the aquatic brain-beating Lancer

    Written by (KFOL) in Canada,

    There have been 3 iterations of Evo, one in 2011, one in 2012 and 2013

    Bag/Instructions

    Bag: The bag shows Evo splashing in the water, let us hope he doesn't trip and

    fall because of the "brainified" tablet.

    Instructions: The instructions are normal, a little comic, the annoying "Put

    everything in sections" ad, instructions end on page 24.

    Parts
    Bones: 4 grey 4622903 , 2 black 4593554, 2 4609682.

    Armour: 3 length 3 in Yellow, 2 length 4 in gun-metal grey and 1 in trans-light

    blue and 1 4652174.

    The build: Simple. Click, click, click and you're done

    The completed model: Evo has 3 motions in his Vortex Staff, he can hold it in

    both hands, one hand or he can sheathe it.

    Overall opinion: Evo has a lot of playability* he is even better with children if
    you have 1 or 2 Aquagons. Very good set

    *see completed model

    0 out of 0 people thought this review was helpful.

  • Knowhere Escape Mission

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    Value for money

    I am Groot!

    Written by (TFOL) in United States,

    I have to start by saying, if you are a lego Marvel Super Heros fan, you need to get this set. I bought this set along with the starblaster, and I love them both. When I saw the photos for the Guardians of the Galaxy sets, this one was my favorite. Now some people may think, this one?! Why not the milano? I have 2 things to relpy to that: Rocket Racoon and Groot. These two figures are amazing, and make this set 100% worth it. Now on to the set break down.

    Box/Instructions

    The box is a medium sized box, typical for a 40-50 dollar set. This set came with 2 small instruction manuals and a 'comic book" as well.

    Parts

    This set comes with 433 pieces and costs 40 dollars, so the price per piece is just under 10 cents per piece. This is very good, especially for a lisenced set.

    Minifigures

    As I stated in the overveiw, the minifigs will really drive this set. Rocket Racoon and Groot are great!! A sacaaren soldier comes in ever GOTG set, so he is not rare, but still a nice fig. Nebula looks cool, but since The movie has not come out yet, I am not sure of her role in the film.

    The build

    The little mining pod is cool, but it seems a little out of place for this set. It obviously will play a part in the film, so maybe after I see the film, it will make a bit more sense to me. The mining base is cool, and has some good play features. It has a small catapult, a trapdoor, and a tower knock down/explode feature which are all very fun.

    The completed model

    Overall, all of this stuff combined makes a very nice looking set.

    Overall opinion

    All in all, I love this set and would recommend it to anyone who is a GOTG fan

    3 out of 4 people thought this review was helpful.

  • Twinblade Adventures

    Overall rating
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    Parts
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    Value for money

    My first set of LEGO (since I am an adult)

    Written by (AFOL) in Poland,

    As a Child I was a big fan of LEGO but only recently rediscovered all the fun it comes with. This is the first set I have bought for myself and not received as a gift.

    In the shop I wanted to choose a set with a relatively low price but with enough pieces to build something completely different and complex from.

    I really liked the color palette and was really happy with the just-right amount of unique elements as well. (I wanted reusable common pieces for creative building.)

    Unfortunately this set doesn't come with any mini figures, but it is not surprising since the figures would be too big to be placed inside. (Except for the biplane build, but in that case Homer's eyesight was blocked by the upper layer of wings, which is a bit annoying).

    I enjoyed the building phase really much, but not for it's complexity, rather because of the built-up nostalgia demand I have.

    It's a fairly easy build, but the end result looks really cool. It is fun to carry it around the room, spin the propeller from time-to-time, while making childish rotor-sounds. (The helicopter has the largest propeller, hence it keeps the spinning momentum for the longest time.)

    To sum up, me and my girlfriend had fun building the 3 variations and I am very happy I added this set to my collection.

    0 out of 0 people thought this review was helpful.

  • King's Castle

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    Parts
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    Value for money

    My first castle... and it lasted a loooooooong time.

    Written by (Parent) in Belgium,

    As mentioned in my review of #6972 Polaris-I Space Lab, this was the other set that had been left in built-up condition for far too long and thus was also hit very hard by yellowing. While the white base has cleaned up nicely, with the grey bricks it is more difficult to get a consistent result. Not only that, the minifigures themselves have been worn down completely: blank heads, faded torso prints and loose joints (or even cracked arms and torsos). As if that wasn't enough broken saddle clips, a broken 1 x 1 x 2 shutter holder brick and broken shields meant one castle in a very sorry state... So I just bit the bullet and bought another one in much better condition.

    Box/Instructions

    Another A4/letter size booklet, this time amounting to 44 steps on 24 pages (at 674 pieces this works out to an amazing average of 15 pieces each step). The front page shows the castle (as can be seen on the image of this set here), then another page for the minifigures and then just building, building, and more building. I absolutely loved all the alternative ideas presented on the box: the big keep, the great hall, the way a smaller castle and keep (even with opposing armies) could be built, the knight's procession... they all fuelled the imagination tremendously and made me wish for a second or even third copy (as such, I did not throw out my old, worn set and don't plan on doing so, I hope it can still be salvaged).

    Parts

    Well, it's a huge pile of grey with some black thrown in. If you want a colourful castle you've clearly come to check the wrong set, although with all the minifigures and flags in place it's not too bad. At the time, this castle had a huge parts count and they weren't all 1 x 1 plates: 30 2 x 5 x 6 wall panels (more then any other set I know of), 89 grey 1 x 2 bricks (fully a third of all our grey 1 x 2 bricks, in fact more grey bricks than you can shake a stick at), lots of slopes and plates, a black 1 x 4 x 6 (prison) door, a winch with handle and three green baseplates means you can build a lot of castle.

    Minifigures

    Twelve! Four with plate mail print (knights, fixed grill helmet), four with the lion print (archers, helmet with chin protector) and four with the crossed axes print (guards, helmet with neck protector). Four horses too, this set alone makes a veritable army. And a well-equipped one, at that: four axes, four spears, four bows and quivers, six lances, seven swords, eight shields, and four plastic capes and a dozen (literally) plumes to top it off. True to the times, they all have the standard smiley face so are indistinguishable from one another except for the knights who at least have some individuality: another horse, saddle, plume, flag, torso or shield colour was about everything that was possible. Still, this makes it easy to get a uniformed army, maybe not so realistic but good-looking at least. I never minded the red or blue pants and just took them as part of the coloured tunic over their armour.

    The build

    Largely symmetrical, but since you're building both parts at the same time it's never boring (you're not repeating the same steps but rather doing all at once). For the children this was rather difficult (I remember I got this for my fifth birthday and my dad had to help me too) as with these old instructions you just have to look at the next step and spot the differences, in this case there can be a lot of bricks added in one step. The stairs in the back, the prison (the door can be locked with a bar), the plate-built portcullis, the gatehouse... Everything is fun to build and they became my de facto standards which were added to or varied upon in further castles.

    The completed model

    What it lacks in colour it certainly makes up for in playability: since it is built on three baseplates and is hinged it can be set up as a self-contained castle or just a part of a larger whole (as castle sets at the time had the technic brick with hole and pin so they could all be connected, if you found a way around the difference in baseplate and plate thickness). The portcullis and drawbridge can be raised or lowered (the eternal fight between my children: should they remain open or closed?), the prison can be locked (after being filled to the brim with whatever minifigure is lying around, although skeletons, ghosts and the mummies from #7326 Rise of the Sphinx are clear favourites). And as mentioned before, the box even gives inspiration to create two separate factions (each with it's own castle) out of this set. This was very helpful, as there is no opposing force (although usually this force, if included, is hopelessly outclassed anyway) and for a while this was my only castle set. Later on there were enough knights of other factions in our collection to render the point moot but it is nice they thought about it.

    Overall opinion

    Of course, my recollection of this set is heavily coloured by memories so this could be the reason for the high scores I'm giving this set but it would be impossible for me to do otherwise. I don't have experience with castle sets newer then #6081 King's Mountain Fortress anyway so in my lego castle experience this is the castle standard. And so far my boys seem to agree... lower the gate - no, raise the gate - I said lower ah well, throw him into the dungeon (at least there's agreement over that part)!

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  • Sheriff's Lock-Up

    Overall rating
    Building experience
    Parts
    Playability
    Value for money

    LEGO as an AfterThought: Ain't No Space Rangers Here

    Written by (AFOL , bronze-rated reviewer) in United States,

    The Westerners theme was one of the boldest, most stereotypical themes LEGO had ever done. Yet it was and remains the only LEGO theme focused on the American Wild West. Why this is, no one is quite sure, but it is probably similar to the Pirates theme in that LEGO intends to reboot it at some point in the near future. With the success of the CUUSOO Western Town project recently, I'm fairly certain the theme will be revived.

    That all being said, let's have a look at the Sheriff's Lock-Up, the first of six sets I'll be reviewing of the Westerners line.

    Innovations: The Westerners theme introduced to the world the "log" brick, a normal-sized brick that when coupled with other similar bricks looked like log walls. The Sheriff's office was the only building in town created completely out of them next to Fort Legorado. There is much to like about the Lock-Up, from the sloped pseudo-false front porch and building to the crenelated jail cell. But none of these were innovations unique to this set. The only real innovation was a bit of mechanics in the jail cell that caused the wall to blow open. A spring-loaded Technic piece rigged to pop out when a 1x2 plate was inserted into a gap in the wall did the trick, and boy it was fun to do over and over again.

    Lack of Inspiration: However much I love the Westerners theme, there are always places where it lacks a certain flare. First and most importantly, the buildings are all very small with open backs. That's to be expected, but it provides little room for play. The jail cell too is overly detailed, which is unusual. The crenelation on the roof is not stylistically appropriate to the time, more appropriate to a castle than a block house. It's understandable that LEGO didn't want to just make a simple grey brick beside the Sheriff's office, but that would have been more appropriate. And like all of the LEGO minifigures of the 1990s, these figures are basic at best with no back details, simple face designs on the good guys, and generic repetition of figures among the series as a whole.

    What it Got Right: Where the Sheriff's Lock-Up went right is in the balance of Sheriff and Deputy with inmate and conspirator. It also made certain to include a horse, though two or three would have been better. The stickers on the windows and on the roof are excellent, while the printed TNT, wanted poster, and playing cards are always fun to have around. The little details of the sage grass and the barrel were always hallmarks of the Westerners line, adding that extra touch that made it great. Even the raised flooring of the Sheriff's office is appropriate to the time and looks good.

    Possible Improvements: Were this set to be remodeled and re-released, I think the cell block should be in darker grays with a much more solid feel to it. No wood bricks on its roof. The office itself should be larger, with a few more deputies, and the cell block could also be moved inside to match the Wild West stereotype better. The horse could definitely use the Lord of the Rings updating, and the windows could be printed, but otherwise most of this set is pretty well-done.

    Minifigure: Where the Westerners did the most good but also the most wrong was with its characters. First off we get the sheriff. His face is the same we have seen on Pirates since 1989 and it still is unimpressive. The hat was the new style cowboy hat in a unique color with a printed star in the center, so no complaints there. His shirt shows a proper gentlemen in a grey suit coat and bowtie accompanied with a pocket watch and sheriff's star. The pants, though, are plain black and for whatever reason, he is wearing black gloves. Overall, a good figure in need of improvement. The cowboy has sandy blonde hair which is cut off awkwardly and seems more appropriate to the City theme. His white hat is unique to him and he is wearing a leather jacket over a red undershirt. Plain blue pants complete an ensemble that today would require printed pants for certain. Is he a deputy or just a cowboy? We'll never know.

    There are two bad guys with this set, and neither are the leader. Bandit #2, as BrickSet calls him, is a mean guy with broken gold teeth showing and a rare printed nose. He wears a brown cowboy hat, black bandana, and grey pants. His shirt is red and stretching in parts, with printed suspenders and a black gunbelt. Today, the belt would be on the hips, leg paintings would show guns, and he'd have some sort of back painting on his bead. Still, a pretty unique individual here. Bandit #3 has most of his teeth in tact, but one is gold. He wears a black top hat, black gloves, and dark gray pants. His shirt shows a green blazer over a card symbol-checkered button-up, with a string tie and pocketwatch chain. He seems like he likes to gamble...a lot!

    How it Compares: Overall, this is an excellent set and its original pricing was perfect. It includes four figures, a horse, and a nice set to play on with a fun trigger mechanism and little treasures in the Sheriff's office. It remains incomparable to modern sets because no Westerners sets have since been remade, but the hope will be that the entire line will get a reboot soon. If you ever get a chance to buy this set, pick it up ASAP.

    2 out of 4 people thought this review was helpful.