• Sets that Really Should not Have Made it to the Shelves or our Beautiful Homes

    Compiled by Dentarthurdent. Updated 03 April 2010. Contains 8 sets.
    This bricklist is the controversial companion to its predecessor and consists of those sets that really should have been thought a bit more about before being released by Lego. Superbly littered with a collection of those painstakingly annoying sets that made you cringe, this list will enlighten you in ways unimaginable. The set with the worst design. The set with the utterly useless baseplate. The set with the ugliest minifigure. The set with the most worthless bricks. The set that will make you vomit. The set that will make you vomit and then eat your own vomit. The set that will make you vomit, eat your own vomit, and then vomit again...I digress, this experience is relative – but the scenarios are endless.

    61 out of 61 people thought this BrickList was helpful.

7661: Jedi Starfighter with Hyperdrive Booster Ring

52 reviews
Pieces
575
Minifigs
2
RRP
$49.99, £48.95
Instructions
Yes
Bricklist notes
Arguably the most unconscionably lucrative strategy by the Lego Company. To most of us, I imagine this Jedi Starfighter with Hyperdrive Booster Ring was bought solely for its Kit Fisto minifigure. Naturally, when Lego decided to release Kit in a magnet set, most of us were foaming at the mouth. But more to the point, this set should never have made it to the shelves due to its absurdly disproportionate nature and similarly absurd price. Featuring a teensy Starfighter, this so-called “set’s” pieces are majorly comprised of useless tiny grey pieces for the hyperdrive unit which, to put it nicely, is both ugly and UGLYUGLY. Curiously enough, many have thrown away the hyperdrive after being unable to remove the vomit stains off of it and have just preserved the Starfighter in their pretty cabinets. A nod of admiration to such people out there.
Our community
3885 own this set, 2260 want it.

6900: Cyber Saucer

8 reviews
Pieces
114
Minifigs
1
RRP
$22
Packaging
Box
Availability
Retail
Instructions
Yes
Related sets
Same as 6999-1
Bricklist notes
Containing a generous serving of useless parts, this set wins the award for the set with the most worthless bricks. As if the ugly luminous arc-plates weren’t enough, Lego supplemented these with even uglier grey prop-up pieces and antennae. When put together, this collection of bricks resembles what you left in your toilet’s commode this morning. By far and away the most likely thing in your household that you will choose to give away at a garbage sale, this set is definitely something Lego will be slapping their knees in anger about. Kudos to you Lego: you put together the worst combination of Lego bricks and decided to call it a Lego set.
Our community
1085 own this set, 315 want it.

8039: Venator-Class Republic Attack Cruiser

22 reviews
Pieces
1170
Minifigs
5
RRP
$119.99, £102.99, €139.99
Instructions
Yes
Bricklist notes
I am aware that this will most likely get under the oh-so tender skin of those Star Wars devotees out there, but this set takes home the bacon for having the worst-looking minifigure. Featuring an old gnomish figure shamelessly posing as Chancellor Palpatine, this same figure is possibly the ugliest thing you will ever see. Moments after its release, stories spread like wildfire among the Lego community, telling of incidents of where people had gouged their own eyeballs out of their sockets to save themselves from looking at this awful creature. Having a similar effect on the average human being to that of the Gorgon’s Head, I advise all readers out there to stay away from this evil monster and invest their money in another set. It is just not worth the risk. Your sight is much more important than filling that tiny empty space in your minifigure collection.
Our community
3136 own this set, 2994 want it.

7047: Coast Watch HQ

8 reviews
Pieces
367
Minifigs
4
RRP
$50, £39.99
Packaging
Box
Availability
Retail
Instructions
Yes
Bricklist notes
Having possibly the least useful baseplate in Lego history, this set is often mistaken for a mound of sand, the practical upshot of which leads to it being trampled mercilessly by toddlers who think that they’ve discovered a miniature beach in the middle of their living rooms. Featuring burlesque blackish rock-facets, this baseplate is better left in its box and the box thrown in the nearest garbage repository (make sure you place it in the correct waste bin, though, we don’t want The Environmentalists on our backs).

Perhaps most frustratingly, this baseplate cannot be used anywhere outside its set. Even the most imaginative of souls – Jack Stone – could not find another use for this piece of plastic waste and deemed it unfit for inanimate existence, stating famously in his Legein Kampf “All my life I have lived by the maxim ‘Can do, Will do, Done’...but after looking at this worthless baseplate I can no longer live by this principle. My life is today forfeit.” Many have mourned the consequent loss of the ‘Legondary’ icon Jack Stone and look forward to his return to fame, when hopefully he would have taken a haircut, changed his name, undergone a personality change, forfeited his life and been reborn to become an essentially new person.
Our community
667 own this set, 484 want it.

6037: Witch's Windship

6 reviews
Pieces
56
Minifigs
1
RRP
$8
Packaging
Box
Availability
Retail
Instructions
Yes
Bricklist notes
This little number is responsible for making me retch and hurl on numerous occasions. Containing the most bizarre of Lego pieces – a black bucket-like soup bowl; no one really knows its true purpose. Some have speculated that it is a message from God channelled through the Lego Company, warning us to stay away from Chinese Sweet Corn soup, while fanatics have suggested that it confirms the fact that God is in fact a bucket-deity. Most suggestions, however, have been dismissed as frivolous due to the fact that they don’t mention the indescribably hideous brown jail-bars which come attached to the black-bucket piece. Nevertheless, it is clear that this set only just made it to the shelves thanks to its sheer pointlessness, which was a tad invigorating to a microscopic niche of consumers who were genuinely interested in the anthropological tendencies of Lego bricks, much to everyone’s confusion.
Our community
1499 own this set, 359 want it.

4756: Shrieking Shack

13 reviews
Pieces
444
Minifigs
4
RRP
$50, £39.99
Packaging
Box
Availability
Retail
Instructions
Yes
Bricklist notes
Little need be said in the aid of the undeserving nature of this set in reaching human hands. One look at the picture of the set will suffice.

This is a true materialisation of hell in Lego form.
Our community
1194 own this set, 1137 want it.

6097: Night Lord's Castle

15 reviews
Pieces
601
Minifigs
8
RRP
$80
Packaging
Box
Availability
Retail
Instructions
Yes
Bricklist notes
The bad design of this set is plainly obvious, even in the raving Legomaniac’s eyes. Shamelessly construed as a Lego set with a pitiful upward ascension of bricks, this is hardly worthy of even being looked at. In fact, even the most unambitious of little boys would consider building a Transformation Machine just so that he could transform this set into a human being and throttle it, preferably to death or at least to the clutches of death's dark hand.

However, while this set certainly should never have made it to shelves, it has some useful purposes, though mostly useless. Firstly, one can fling it out the window along with one’s UCS Millennium Falcon. Secondly, one can sort of, though not really, take it along with oneself in a handy carry-bag when one wants something to give one’s least favourite person. And thirdly, one can shatter it to pieces and specially gift-wrap it in order to post it to the Lego Company in the place of a tremendously rude complaint.
Our community
934 own this set, 646 want it.

8169: Lamborghini Gallardo LP 560-4

10 reviews
Pieces
741
RRP
$59.99, £59.99
Packaging
Box
Availability
Retail
Instructions
Yes
Bricklist notes
Last and certainly least, is the Lamborghini Gallardo. A pathetic excuse for a Lego set, one tends to wonder why Lego bought the license for Lamborghini if they were going to build such a horrendous yellow box. Reminiscent of the animal excess you saw in the park last evening, the frontal area of this set is simply terrible. Many have envisioned a future free of these awful plastic boxes and have started what is known as "The Campaign for the Removal of 8169 from this Earth," to which you might be able to make a donation at your local Lego repository. Ashamed as I am to admit it, I own one of these poo-boxes. I can say safely this day that the decision to buy it was by far and away the worst decision I have ever made in my entire life. Of what I'm equally sure is that no decision worse than this will ever transpire in my future.

Stay away from this set. And if you (still) see it on the shelves in your local store, inconspicuously pick it up and hide it in the men's clothing section or, if you're really bold, tear open the box in-store and scatter its worthless contents liberally on the aisles.

One would think that Lego would consider the appearance of a set more before releasing it to the world. I would even go so far as to liken it to opening a can of long-expired baked beans in front of your grandmother. Yes, it's gross and it smells bad. And your grandmother loves you. Who in their right mind would do such a thing? And more importantly, why?

Hopefully next time, Lego would just dispose of the can of beans before opening it. No one wants to smell its odour.
Our community
897 own this set, 603 want it.