Miniland scale figures in a set, at last!

Posted by ,
LEGOLAND Entrance with Family

LEGOLAND Entrance with Family

©2014 LEGO Group

This morning's trawl of new instructions added at LEGO Customer Services has revealed this interesting LEGOLAND set which contains four miniland-scale people and a 'park entrance'.

I believe this is the first time that miniland people have appeared in a regular set, and it's about time too. When I first visited a LEGOLAND park (in 1996) one of the first things I wanted to do when I got home was to build some miniland people, from photos I'd taken. I'm sure I'm not alone so it's surprising that LEGO hasn't capitalised on this before now.

Look out for it at a LEGOLAND park near you soon.

34 comments on this article

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Thanks, although they are not widely available, are they, or for general sale.

Gravatar
By in Hungary,

These figs still scare the hell out of me.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I'm staying at Legoland Windsor at Easter...will keep my eyes peeled and fingers crossed for one of these being left in the hotel room 'safe' instead of the polybags we got last year.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

^I'm staying in a couple of weeks hopefully we will get one of these

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Very cool! Finally a Legoland set I want to buy :0)

Gravatar
By in United States,

Cool, so looking towards my trip to a LegoLand soon.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Well I Should be going back to LEGOLAND florida this summer i will pick up a few when i go

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Great - boy in blue with the sword and shield and girl in pink with the fairy wand. When is TLG going to stop gender-stereotyping in every single set?

Gravatar
By in United States,

Looks great! I believe the first space sets, and others in the mid 70's had LL scale figures thought they were not the 'LL figs' we know today

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Given there's no facial details how do we not know the blue figure with sword is actually a female and the figure in pink with a fairy wand is male?!

Gravatar
By in United States,

@wainwrib: I don't see 'male' or 'female', 'boy' or 'girl' attached to either of those miniland figures. It very well could be a young boy dressed as a princess and his older sister in the knight outfit. I think the only one stereotyping is you. ;]

Gravatar
By in United States,

A reason to skip school and work for a week to go hangout with my grandma halfway across the country to go to the LEGOLAND in Florida? I see no fault in that plan!

Gravatar
By in United States,

Besides: How the hell are you supposed to denote 'boy' and 'girl' at this scale without stereotyping?

Gravatar
By in United States,

AND most young boys play with swords, and most young girls play as princesses. Also, blue and pink are the two colors that are always used to differentiate the male from the female gender. What makes it any different here? O.o

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I don't think a LEGO fan site is the place for a debate on gender stereotyping!

But, I did conduct my own little experiment with my kids;

My daughter is the oldest. From a very young age we bought toys that I'd consider non-gender specific. As she's grown older, her favourite colour has changed from yellow to pink and prefers Barbie, Disney Princess and Monsters High dolls to cars, LEGO and toy tools. My son arrived during my daughter's 'transition' chose the cars, lego and toy tools over the extensive doll collection in our home. He recently announced his favourite colour is blue, especially the blue cars we see in the streets. On a recent toy shop trip he chose a Nerf gun over everything else on offer even though neither myself nor my wife would promote such a thing. My daughter bought a Barbie doll outfit.

So, whilst the concept of gender stereotyping may exist, I'm a firm believer that the vast majority of males like blue, shooting stuff and building things and the majority of females like pink, dollies and dressing up. It's genetics not persuasion.

There's is the odd exception though, my son likes pink cake and I ride a £5K mountain bike that's bright pink.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

^I belive there are more influences other than parents on genger stereotyping. Everything we see on television, in magazines and at school for example. There we learn that girls play with dolls and boys like to shoot eachother. And all kids really want is to appear normal, to be accepted by others. A boy playing with dolls is not generally found normal. Nor is a 30 year old with over 130.000 LEGO bricks, but that is another story entirely. So if dolls and guns are the stereotype toys, they will use them. So I am not convinced it is 'genetic'. There are just to many factors that influence a childs or an adult for that matter preferences.

That said I really dislike the miniland figures. On my first trip to LEGOland Denmark I was shocked to find out that miniland is not occupied by regular minifigures.
A great dissapointment. To be quite honest, there are simply incredibly ugly!

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

^ It may sound primitive, but throughout the ages 'normality' has seen 'man' as 'hunter/gatherer' and 'woman' as the 'home-keeper/mother'... whilst modern society frowns upon this today, so-called modern society has existed for only several decades, whilst the 'norm' has existed for several thousands of years at the very least.

As well has riding a pink bike, I'm also the 'home-keeper' in our family whilst my wife is the high-flying 'hunter/gatherer'... I much prefer looking after the children, washing clothes, cooking meals and doing the housework in between playing with LEGO.

Gravatar
By in United States,

And that is one of the many things wrong in the politically correct word today. Why can't blue be a boy and pink be a girl, and that's all? I don't want to live in a world run by people that got a time out and everyone gets a trophy. Now for the set itself I care for it personally as I like my figure mini size and that's why I don't like the friends/Disney line.

Gravatar
By in Australia,

woo hoo!! as an AFOL that builds in miniland scale more than any other this is great! just have to get from Australia to a LEGOLand to get one.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

^^^ I agree with mr_skinny. Throughout the ages there have been gender stereotipes. The fact that we are debating this, is again proof that they are sadly still in some degree in existance. I am a ferm believer that children and adults should follow there heart no matter the coulor they want to follow :-)
I am expecting a baby in a couple of weeks. Shopping for cloths without knowing the genger is near impossible. It is either blue, pink or white. The latter ones are usually a bit plain. And I don't like pink. So that makes it even more difficult. I would not have a problem with a boy in a pink shirt, but a pink dress really is a bridge to far (is this a real English expression, or just badly translated from Dutch?). Gender stereotyping starts even before a child can speak its first word.

To stay on the real subject: maybe toys need to have stereotyping. Otherwise it is to difficult to tell the difference?

Gravatar
By in United States,

I've been wanting to figure out how to build these. I wanted to build an Optometrist giving an eye exam in that scale so I can display it at work.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I had just managed to forget how horrible miniland figures look.
What a timely reminder.
AFOLs build AMAZING figures in a variety of styles at this scale; WHY would TLG stick with these primitive awkward builds?

Gravatar
By in United States,

@kliq - nicely done!

Gravatar
By in United States,

Wow... I would buy one of these (or make a few on my own with spare parts). I bought the picture frame as the best memento of our latest trip to Legoland/California– well that & the picture of our 4yr old on The Dragon.

Gravatar
By in United States,

All the people are tan....

Someone will call LEGO racists the same day this is released.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

...and possibly anti-gay, seeing as the parents appear to be of opposite gender too.

To summarise, this set appears to be;

1) Gender stereotyping
2) Racist
3) Anti-gay

If some of these were used we might also get an insight into the family's political views and religious beliefs too;

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Lego-speech-Bubble-with-figure/dp/B007I0C9M2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1393920236&sr=8-1&keywords=Lego+speech

Or, perhaps the set just reflects a typical northern European family enjoying a trip to Legoland Denmark?!

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

perhaps its a dwarf , adult with learning difficulties , transvestite and a terminally ill girl on her last holiday ? i like it .

Gravatar
By in United States,

Mariann Asanuma pointed out on her blog that these figures are built incorrectly because they have no chins.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Maybe these are actually transethnic otherkin gay dwarf transsexuals?

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

May not even be indigenous to Planet Earth (with or without chins)

Gravatar
By in Denmark,

I love LEGOLAND's Minilands but these aren't very good minilanders. The legs are chunky and they're missing chins. Minilanders could've been an interesting little build

Gravatar
By in United States,

Miniland scale is one of my favorites, but these are terrible! Considering I worked at LEGOLAND California building Miniland models for 4 years and I've continued to build Miniland models since then, I can't believe how bad these are. They don't have chins -- a jumper under the 2x2 head part . The "mom" looks anorexic and their shoulders are wrong. Shoulders should also be jumpers with 1x1 tiles on them. I even pointed out to one of my LEGO set designer friends on Facebook that they were designed wrong and he couldn't see what the problem is -- the problem is that LEGO set designers don't know how to do Miniland scale.

Gravatar
By in United States,

They're at least not racist since the instructions and parts list show an alternate build and extra parts to build a black family.

Return to home page »