New inventories and parts

Posted by ,

LEGO has just published instructions and inventories for the March releases on its customer services portal. Although I have not checked them all, the inventories appear to be complete and include a couple of interesting new parts which I examine after the break.

A total of 244 new elements have surfaced in the new inventories, which you can view here and here. These include a number of old elements that have been assigned a new element ID for whatever reason, dozens of minifigure and printed parts and, most interestingly, a couple of new 'System' parts and recolours of existing parts.

The curved slopes 11477 (Plate W. Bow 1X2X2/3) and 15068 (Plate W. Bow 2X2X2/3) are among my favourite parts that have been introduced recently so these new matching corner slopes are particularly welcome. They are used on Speed Champions car bonnets and come in three colours:

Design ID 29119: Right Plate 1X2, W/ Bow, 45 Deg. Cut

Element IDs: 6177507 (Bright Red), 6172411 (Bright Blue), 6181713 (black)

Design ID 29120: Left Plate 1X2, W/ Bow, 45 Deg. Cut

Element IDs: 6177505 (Bright Red), 6172414 (Bright Blue), 6181720 ( Black)

You can see in in use here on the Bugatti:


DesignID: 27928 Plate 2X2, W/ Design

Element ID: 6163991 (Reddish Brown)

Nexo Knights has introduced a lot of part with a sharp 45-degree angle on them but this particular one appears in Minecraft 21130 The Nether Railway.

In the set is appears to be used as a track connector. The geometry is particularly interesting. The 45 degree angle allows two of them to be abutted at 90 degrees, as you can see in the image below, and the size of the 'nub' on the top fills the gap between the ends of the curved 'rails' and the straight sections. I look forward to examining it in closer detail.

Applications for this part are not as immediately obvious as the curved slope corners but I'm sure some will find a use for them in their MOCs.

Let us know in the comments if these, or any of the recolours, excite you.

 

Sponsored content

35 comments on this article

Gravatar
By in New Zealand,

That Minecraft piece could be useful for ofsetting without a gap. We'll need some more colours though.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Both of these pieces have a lot of potential for MOC's and other designs. It's great to see LEGO stepping it up with new parts.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Is it me or is that piece the Bugatti a different blue. I thought some of the Yellow matching was bad.... but Ironically on possibly the most expensive car in the world a bad paint job..... Still getting one mind........

Gravatar
By in United States,

The plate 2x2 w/ design looks like it would be great for backpacks. Stick a wedge on the stud and put it on a neck bracket. To bad we only have it in brown.

Gravatar
By in United States,

@Lego34s I think that they might be painted. Like that is a prototype version of the piece and there was only a prototype for the moment when product images were needed. When you look at old 1999 Star Wars art, the lightsaber handles are a slightly different design; prototype versions.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Both parts are going to be very useful for building.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I'm really starting to think that many of the new pieces coming out are largely unnecessary. Lego is moving away from problem solving and just answering everything with "new piece!" Not a good trend in my opinion, despite the usefulness of new parts for MOCing.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

^ how would you solve thes problems without nes parts then?

Gravatar
By in United States,

@McLegoboy Perhaps, but I see different shades of the same color all the time in actual sets.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I agree, Tim Lydy... piece bloat is becoming a real problem and is portending another Lego crash! One of the major problems with Lego's financial situation in the late 90s-early '00 was too many pieces.. especially badly designed kiddie-fied Jack Stone parts. Knudstrom's great idea was to get rid of many pieces and reduce mold maintenance and production cost. This forced designers to get better and led directly to great themes and sets we have now..... but in the last three years piece-bloat has gotten bad again. I think that for every new piece they put into production, they should end production one one....

Gravatar
By in United States,

@drewchadwick: You say that, but your suggestion is something that they actually already do. Lego still maintains a limit on how many elements can be in use at any one time. You may not notice it because it's easier to keep track of new parts as they're introduced than it is to notice when old parts are retired, but nonetheless Lego is keeping strict tabs on those numbers.

Keep in mind that growth alone was not the cause of Lego's woes in the early 2000s—UNRESTRAINED growth was. And since then Lego has become much more business savvy, with a lot more critical accounting and decision making happening behind the scenes.

Gravatar
By in Finland,

@Tim Lydy: You stole my words. If everything is solved with a new piece, there will be way too many relatively similar and only little different pieces. There are already some unnecessary new parts that I've encountered in recent sets.

Gravatar
By in Poland,

Lyichir. We know how these parts can be used. Kids- not so much. I noticed many of my students (age 4-10) have problems with understanding and using SNOT in their builds. Also the problem with too many parts but not enough colors for them.
Lego is seen more like a one use toy today,. And it is frightening.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Yes, it's probably 'one part in, one part out'. It's certainly that for colours.

Gravatar
By in United States,

The minecraft rail piece is so weird but looks super useful.

Gravatar
By in Austria,

I have to agree with some of the commenters before me: I don't like this "parts inflation" as well. It is a thought I got recently while building the great "Assembly Square" with many new pieces.

Granted, they are great for MOCers, but when I watch my kids, it's a different story. They prefer classic, large 2 by 2, 2 by 4, 2 by 8 LEGO bricks (ideally lots of them in identical colours) for building houses, walls etc. And when was the last time you got even ONE of those, even in "classic" parts bins?

Even there you find loads of different tiny pieces in lots of colours, but hardly any "bricks". They rely on my 30+ year old collection for their supply of those. I have them, because in my childhood, they were largely available.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

I wonder how jamie berard and his team will use them in D2Cs in creative ways!

Gravatar
By in United States,

@Lyichir is right about element inventory management. New pieces are created for advancing the sophistication of the build, which does not sell merely to kids. Expanding color availability for MOCs isn't a priority; most Lego users want to build models in kits per the IPs they are most interested in.

lordofdragonss I disagree. Lego is the top global toy company, and the top company of all multinationals in brand "power" equity (according to one equity measuring paradigm of Brand Finance, and still quite high by several others like Interbrand); TLG are being smart about extensions. They are funding that equity by investment into bottom line growth, not merely "one use" proliferation. Nor are they merely gaming their value through share buybacks (a common problem getting much press these days) just headlined Harvard Business Review this week.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I love the new parts being released by TLG. The Joker Notorious Lowrider #70906 really saved my bacon with a couple of the new dark purple tiles. Up until its release, there were no odd length dark purple tiles...everything was 1x2, 1x4, 1x6, etc. The Lowrider introduced the 1x1 and 1x3 dark purple tiles. I was able to completely (and more cost-effectively) redesign the MOC I'm currently working on. Thanks TLG!!

Gravatar
By in United States,

I've got to disagree with some of the anti new parts sentiments here, I love me some new parts! A lot of the new parts from the late 90s were large pieces that were difficult to use for other purposes. In contrast to that, most of the new parts today are ones that fit well into the "system". They're mostly modifications of existing pieces, like SNOT bricks with varying numbers and positions of studs, or wedge plates with the same angles as existing ones in different sizes. Even with truly new parts, like this Minecraft piece or some of the parts in the Nexo Knights sets, there seems to be a lot more attention given to making sure those parts mesh well with existing parts.

Gravatar
By in Finland,

@Farmer_John: You know, those are part recolors (old parts in new colors), not new parts per se. They aren't nearly as bad when we're talking about totally brand new molds.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Aaaand of course I can't buy any of them..

Gravatar
By in United States,

@TransNeonOrangeSpaceman: Which is exactly why using this post to complain about "too many new molds" is so silly. Among the 244 parts added to the Brickset database in the past few days, there are a mere 14 molds that are new this year. Everything else is a recolor or reprint. Is that number REALLY worth getting worked up about?

Plus, anybody who thinks classic sets didn't introduce highly specialized new parts is kidding themselves: http://www.newelementary.com/2014/08/when-lego-was-never-just-bricks.html

Gravatar
By in United States,

Dang those are neat! Perfect for adding little details and easing transitions in larger builds.

Gravatar
By in Finland,

@Aanchir: I wasn't talking about just the most recent parts, I meant new part molds in general that have been released over the recent years.

Gravatar
By in United States,

What children build decide to build must be a regional thing. I go to weekly Lego clubs with my 3 boys ages 5-8 and I rarely see kids building walls and houses.

The builds by kids are based on space, ninjago vehicles, transformers and the sci-fi cartoons currently on television here in the states.

2x4 bricks are simply space fillers for the kids I see playing with Lego these days.

Gravatar
By in Sweden,

The beauty of Lego is to be creative with a small set of standardized pieces, not to create new pieces just because you can't think hard enough to build what you want. Parts inflation is no good.

Gravatar
By in United States,

@Dude45: Okay, let's run with that idea for argument's sake. Where, specifically, do you draw the line as to how many new parts are "too many"? Lego has been introducing new parts since its inception. Did Lego go too far when they started introducing curved slopes? Or when they introduced the minifigure? Or how about when they first introduced sloped bricks in general, or bricks that were only one stud wide instead of two?

The idea that the introduction of new parts in and of itself is a bad thing is a flawed argument, because parts are generally introduced specifically because of cases where existing parts CAN'T solve a problem (or can't solve one as well as a new part would). Take the 2x2 or 4x4 "macaroni tiles" from the Assembly Square. Those very clearly fill specific gaps in the existing "system"—they're tile versions of parts that are already available as bricks. The sets that use this part COULD use other tiles instead, but it would fail to achieve the same purpose, which is to fill a space with a smooth curve that matches that of other parts. But even more complex parts like 29119 follow the same rules, combining the geometries of existing parts into a new part that serves a purpose that alternative parts couldn't match. And they're still versatile. Combine 29119 and 29120 at the diagonal edge, and suddenly you've essentially got a "corner bow" piece, something that was completely impossible with traditional bow pieces. 27928 is similarly based on existing geometries, and allows for much better rails in the Minecraft theme than the rougher and more rudimentary solution used in the first year's sets. But it could also be used for a unique-looking wall sconce or architectural element. Just because existing parts could solve a problem poorly does not mean that the introduction of a part that could solve it more elegantly is irrelevant or unnecessary.

Gravatar
By in Switzerland,

I have the feeling that this 2 new blue pieces on the Bugatti are spay-painted prototypes (they are not even on their surface) and this is why there is a slightly different shade of blue…

Gravatar
By in United States,

I got some of those new corner baby bows in a Speed Champions set today... very interesting parts, they do fit together in a corner, but I'm not sure quite what to do with them once I eventually disassemble that model.

Gravatar
By in Australia,

So much hype for that corner baby bow. Cant wait until its more available and in more colors, Ive needed a piece like that so many times

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I started with Lego when there were 2 colors, 3 if you count grey baseplates. Love the modern LEGO colour palette and the parts range is much saner - I have a shed full of huge one-function pieces from the 1990's that I don't know what to do with.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I can't wait to try the track piece for one of my MOCs

Gravatar
By in United States,

Oh look. Lego copied a Mega Construx piece.

Return to home page »