85 years of LEGO!

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View image at flickr

Today marks the 85th anniversary of LEGO's foundation by Ole Kirk Kristiansen. The company and its products have changed a great deal since then as wooden toys were superseded by plastic interlocking bricks and this famed system of play has subsequently allowed LEGO to become the largest toy manufacturer in the world.

LEGO has achieved this success through constant innovation and choosing a single favourite example of such advancement is difficult. Nevertheless, we are challenging Brickset readers to do just that so would ask which of the many innovations made throughout LEGO's history has been the most welcome from your perspective?

Might it be the creation of the minifigure in 1978, the advent of licensed themes in 1999 or something else entirely? Let us know in the comments below.

110 comments on this article

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By in United States,

Unpopular opinion here: constraction's existence. We've received themes that have inspired many, like Robo Riders, BIONICLE (G1 and G2), HERO Factory, Star Wars Buildable Figures, Super Heroes Ultrabuilds, and much more. Maybe try to forget about Galidor and Ben 10, though...

Constraction really opened up LEGO's portfolio to a whole other area of toys, and I don't think I'd be as into the hobby as I am now without it.

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By in United States,

I'm with TheBrickPal on this. I'd say constraction, but more specifically Bionicle. Not only was it the first theme I remember getting and the only LEGO theme I stayed interested in for the entirety of its existence, it literally saved LEGO from bankruptcy. And even if you aren't a fan of Bionicle or constraction, I think you have to give credit to Bionicle, because without the TLG might not even be around anymore.

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By in United Kingdom,

plates & tiles

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By in United States,

@TheBrickPal, you won't hear any complaints from me. Bionicle will always hold a special place in my heart.

Apart from that, for me personally, Lego's entrance into multimedia like computer games and websites had a huge impact on my enjoyment of the brand, as these developments all happened when I was just starting to get into Lego. The Lego Island video game in particular was a massive influence - a decade later, I was still assembling my own Lego islands with my personal collection of roadplates and town sets. Lego.com was at its prime when I was in elementary school, with so many fantastic flash games that I regrettably couldn't play more (Macromedia Flash was rather finicky back then, as I recall).

Oh, and I'll throw in a nod to Exo-Force. The debut of first and still only Mecha-focused Lego theme still sticks in my mind - I didn't even know what the deal was, apart from a vague teaser in the November/December issue of the official Lego magazine, and then one day that month I wander into ToysRus and stumble on the most amazing battle in a box I've ever seen. Mechs and tanks battling over a bridge and an armored gate? In an official Lego theme? It was my dream come true. Shame the theme degraded in creativity and quality after the first year.

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By in United Kingdom,

Hmmm... When did wheels come out?

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By in United Kingdom,

Not so much a single defined innovation, but just the gradual shift in more recent years to this brilliant style of large models that utilises all kinds of pieces and techniques (old and new!) to combine a stunning and sleek exterior with a very structurally sound interior. Slave I would be a good example of what I'm talking about, as would the Helicarrier, the Modular Buildings or even things like the Disney castle.

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By in United States,

Happy anniversary Lego!!!

For me, it may be the video games produced by Lego and warner brothers. All the creative software makes kids imagination spark, and as for me, when I see a new Lego video game, I get excited to see a new twist and maybe a new way to play with Lego I haven't though of!! After I play I always want to start playing/ building with Lego!

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By in United States,

I'd have to agree with @TheBrickPal. Bionicle (and constraction as a whole) saved Lego from bankruptcy back in the 2000's. We would not be where we are today without constraction.

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By in Ireland,

Boring opinion: Licensed sets. Giving Lego engineers breathing room and fresh challenges by giving them something to work from instead of a series of blank slates. Granted some of my favourite sets are from Lego themselves, no license, I'm just thinking of the weird, weird places Lego have gone when left on their own.

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By in United States,

Perhaps the shift away from the minifigure's generic smile that took place with the the debut of the Pirate theme.

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By in United States,

The Castle theme was what got me into Lego when I was very young, but the release of Star Wars in 1999, when I was 8, is what kept me collecting Lego to this day. Without Star Wars and maybe LOTR, I probably wouldn't have collected any Lego after my childhood.

Edit: I also loved collecting Bionicle as a child, but don't have interest in it anymore.

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By in United States,

I would say the explosion of piece types and color palette are what make LEGO so incredible for me today. I mean I loved building with 4 simple shapes and primary colors as a kid too, but the art that can be created with today's LEGO color and shape inventory is amazing!

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By in Denmark,

THE innovation has to be the LEGO brick per se: the patented brick with the locking cylinder.
Without that no LEGO.

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By in United States,

The introduction of the mini figure.

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By in Belgium,

Base plates... R.I.P.

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By in United States,

One of them would be the multiple variations of the Minifigure head since Pirates was introduced in 1989.

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By in United States,

Brick separator! :)

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By in Croatia,

What did it for me is the widening of the colour palette. It started with tan around 1997 and went on from there.

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By in Italy,

The System of Play.

We all take it for granted now, so much that it's hard to imagine LEGO without it. So I believe it was the most important innovation, even more than the 1958 brick.

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By in United States,

Galidor!

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By in Venezuela,

Personally, I think that thanks to the licensed themes LEGO really expanded its world.

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By in United States,

Everything has helped to shape the company into what it is today, whether it be the first brick or minifigure, and themes like Galidor, which helped push LEGO in the right direction of which we know and love today. Happy Anniversary LEGO!!

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By in United States,

I would say the widening variety of specialized/non-standard bricks that continue to be designed. It has allowed Lego and fan builders to increase the building possibilities.

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By in United States,

wheels! wheels! wheels! wheels! wheels! wheels! wheels! wheels! wheels! and more wheels and technic

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By in United States,

Transparent/translucent parts, helmets with visors

Unpopular opinion: stickers haha

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By in United States,

Skin colored Lego figs

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By in United States,

LEGO movies!

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By in Brazil,

Marvel and DC themes. I like a lot.

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By in Canada,

Hmm. I think I'd have to say the "Modified" pieces that let you expand your direction of building would be what I like the most. There'd be a lot less options if we didn't have them. :P

Happy Birthday LEGO!

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By in United Kingdom,

It's got to be Technical Lego in 1977

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By in United Kingdom,

1978 was the big year: minifigures and "System within the System". Minifigs and themes allowed the ever more detailed tiny worlds we know and love now to take shape.

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By in Ireland,

There have been many smaller innovations but the two game-changers for me were in '77 and '78 (though both had some precursors in the years before):
Technic and the Minifigure.
And in close third: Trains!

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By in United States,

It's the minifig.

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By in Germany,

As a roleplaying gamer I'm a big fan of the Castle theme. Being 41 already, I was a kid when the first gray Castle sets came out, and I still remember buying a large Castle set with my pocket money. Boy was I proud...

The Castle theme went through many iterations, not all of them were to my liking. Black castles? No, I wanted more gray bricks for my own creations! I was no big fan of Fright Knights and while Knights' Kingdom came out during my dark period, I would have hated those colored knights anyway.

But then came 2007 and the Fantasy Era! Dwarves, Undead, Orcs! Yes! I bought the Dwarven Mine several times and never regretted it.

2009 the best Castle set of all times (to my taste) came out: Medieval Village, a great set about the civilian life. Kingdoms was a great subtheme as well, with more civilian sets and the big joust set and its brick built city gate.

Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit were great as well, of course. What all these sets combine is a great color palette and parts that are useful for all kinds of MOCs, while adding great minifigs and utilities for fans of these settings.

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By in United Kingdom,

1978: The Lego Minifigure.

Now you had an interaction of the created environment with a mini you or your character and their things. Miniature learning exploded and micro invention took off. A brick was also a building brick for the character, a plate and wheels now a skateboard.

You could view your world and inventions through your imagination and play with these interactive little people.

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By in United States,

In my opinion Lego's single biggest and most important innovation is the "System of Play." Lego didn't invent the inner-locking brick (neither did Kiddiecraft btw). What they did innovated was their System of Play, as stated in the 10 Points. Everything else Lego has every done since 1955 is a result of the System of Play. Everything including mini-figures, licensed themes, Bionicle and even the missteps like Galidor and Lego Universe are a result of the System of Play.

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By in United States,

I would say changing the lego minifigure heads to flesh tone for themes like Star Wars and many more after. Also I feel Ben 10 could have been a great theme if it had minifigure scale sets and possibly a CMF series.

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By in France,

Lego Technic and Mindstorm !

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By in United States,

I would say the move to licensed themes which created the collectable minifigure fad. This is what drives LEGO commercially, IMO.

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By in United Kingdom,

All of it!

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By in United States,

There's a few things I would say. For example the Modular Buildings, Mindstorms, and the LEGO Ideas program are pretty innovative because they really show that the LEGO Hobby can be not just a kid's toy, but also an art, and a community.

I would also say that The LEGO Movie was really innovative, in a social aspect. I think the popularity of LEGO dramatically increased after The LEGO Movie and more people think that LEGO is really cool. I remember that when The LEGO Movie was coming out, many of my friends who weren't into LEGO before really wanted to talk to me about LEGO. After The LEGO Movie, I started seeing LEGO on mainstream news and more often in places I don't expect to find LEGO content. Currently, I also have friends who don't know what Ninjago is and haven't played with LEGO for a while, but they are interested in the upcoming LEGO Ninjago Movie.

Most of the innovations I thought of were more on the social aspect, but I think it's really important because it gives us an idea on the growth of LEGO in terms of popularity and awareness.

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By in United States,

LEGO would probably have gone bankrupt and would be a very different, smaller, company today if not for getting the Star Wars license. Therefore that is the most important development. If not for it, we wouldn't even be discussing.

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By in Canada,

What does 'constraction' even mean..?

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By in United States,

Specialized pieces. As a kid, I was never a fan of basic bricks. But with wheels, doors, horses, etc. a whole world of narrative and creative building evolved in my play.

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By in Argentina,

Tubes on the bottoms of bricks, or minifigs.

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By in United Kingdom,

For me the crossover of Technic and System parts in sets to allow more advanced and larger structurally sound builds are a big defining moment.
I actually look forward to when someone a lot cleverer than me manages to incorporate the constraction parts into a system build so that all parts become commonplace in builds.

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By in Puerto Rico,

I honestly just love how much variety in parts selection LEGO has been able to accumulate over the years. There's next to nothing you can't build with LEGO bricks, and weird or odd parts have allowed designers to get creative and use them in ways people wouldn't normally think would be possible.

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By in Puerto Rico,

@olivierz "Constraction" refers to Bionicle-type sets. Hero Factory and Star Wars Buildable Figures fall into this category.

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By in United States,

LEGOLAND Space in the 70s and 80s.

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By in Germany,

Studs and anti-studs. Think about it, it's genius!

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By in United States,

The minifig. Nothing is as synonymous with Lego as is the minifig. It is the face of the brand and enables interactive play with Lego creations that opened up a whole new world of possibilities.

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By in United States,

SNOT - without it, we'd have a lot less options for building rich, textured builds.

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By in Belgium,

I would go with those D2C sets which enables them to go crazy in size, details, building techniques and parts usage. It makes me fall in love with LEGO all over again every time a new one comes out even though, unfortunately, I don't have the cash to get them all :(
I somehow trace it back to the original UCS ISD but I think the UCS X-Wing and TIE Fighters came out before it. And I don't remember when the Red Baron, Sopwith Camel and Wright Flyer came out but that's more or less the same period.
Well, OK, one could argue the USS Constellation from the 70s was the real pioneer but you know what I mean XD

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By in France,

I started building my first sets about 35 or 40 years ago, and now collecting the SW range for 8 or 9 years, I must admit that the vast variety of shapes, sizes, elements and colors is - according to me- the big improvement. That drove us to constraction, technics, and more and more accurate and complex models. I just have to compare an old Tie fighter to this year's version to see that the wide range of moulds is the key to these fabulous MOC'S and official releases I see each day... I cannot imagine what incredible experience and things I would have had built if I had owned so many different parts and elements when I was a child, with the flourishing and limitless imagination that you have when you're young. Happy Birthday Lego. I feel like it's a bit or somehow our birthday too isn't it?

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By in United States,

I feel like Bionicle was the start of the extended story themes. Adventurers had a story, Bionicle was more in depth and entertaining in my opinion.

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By in United States,

the brick seperator ,wish i had that as a kid and maybe all my old bricks wouldnt look so ruined

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By in Norway,

Monorail <3

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By in Netherlands,

Erling brick, because without SNOT, building would be boring.

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By in Sweden,

The increasing number of females in CITY themed sets nowadays is a big draw, in my opinion. When I look back at my old CITY collection from 2008-2009, I barely see any females, except for a horse rider and a farmer. Today, women are included in almost every Lego CITY set, even in the construction set line from 2015. In 2008, there was no female construction worker in sight. Talk about an Improvement, and a necessary one!
Not only does this show that Lego aim their products towards BOTH boys and girls, thus widening the consumer group. It also show girls that they can be whatever they want, and that gender should never be a difficulty, regardless of what he or she wants to be in the future.

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By in Netherlands,

Happy birthday to LEGO!
Happy birthday to LEGO!
Happy birthday, Happy birthday!
Happy birthday to LEGO!

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By in Puerto Rico,

I would love to say opening to licensed themes as it both has allowed to come up with their own sub themes (Ninjago and Lego Batman Movie) and allowed me to get Star Wars sets. I also think construction with bigger figures has opened the doors to a great group of fans as well.

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By in United Kingdom,

For me, it's got to be stickers.

Only joking. I agree with others saying Technic Lego. As stand-alone sets, they can offer an expert building experience that is only matched by some of the more advanced Creator sets. But the rigidity that Technic allows in a fraction of the size or pieces that regular Lego would need means that larger models are possible with just a little bit of Technic.

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By in United Kingdom,

Another vote for the millionth minifig from me. Having people to put in the cars, houses or spaceships we built added a whole new dimension to play and boosted Lego over straightforward toy cars etc.

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By in United States,

The choice is obvious: Galidor! HAHAHAHA!!

Seriously though I'd say Licensed Themes; as the Star Wars theme brought me out of my dark ages.

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By in Australia,

Ideas books and alternate builds on the back of boxes or instructions really helped me to start building MOCs. Sadly the alternate builds don't exist now but I still enjoy making my own things.

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By in United States,

I'm going to go with a nerd answer and say the move from Cellulose Acetate to much more stable ABS. I have ABS bricks that are 40 years old and they still clutch as well as a freshly minted piece. ABS is just an excellent material. Aside from that, the Minifig was a game changer.

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By in United States,

To me the very beginning of LEGO in the USA, is my fondest memory, from the WOODEN DUCK to the RED & WHITE original bricks and windows and doors started me on an adventure that has lasted over 63 years! My happy moment was the addition of minifigures and the mini dolls! So HAPPY 85th BIRTHDAY L E G O!!!

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By in United States,

Wow, I share a birthday with LEGO...

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By in Sweden,

Changes all the time, right now it's the minifigure

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By in United States,

I'm going with the original: Tubes on the undersides of bricks. That finally broke them free from 9 years of being a pure Kiddiecraft knockoff/clone brand and set them on their path of innovation to develop all manner of connection types to ultimately enable everything from fully-articulated mechs the height of 2 minifigs, to Ninjago City.

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By in Canada,

As a child from the 1970's and 80's, Fabuland is still my favourite theme, followed by Classic Space, Castle, Forestmen and Pirates!

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By in Norway,

For me it must be the dawn of the minifigure we know today and space.
I have seen both the non movable figure and the big buildable figures with a brick with head and arms.

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By in United States,

I would say the inception of story-based themes: Bionicle to start, and most recently new members to the evergreen theme lineup like Ninjago. Bionicle especially really pulled me into Lego with its rich story (MNOG was a great form of storytelling and world building) and Ninjago reinvigorated my love for Lego with its stellar TV show.

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By in United States,

The minifigure! No doubts about it!

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By in United States,

Happy 85th LEGO!!

I agree that the LEGO System of Play was the most important innovation that TLG has made.

Unfortunately the "System" has suffered greatly since LEGO went into a greatly expanded number of colors. Examply.... how many different colors can you make a low slope or steep slope roof in? Using inside or outside corner bricks very much narrows the colors down to just the old basic colors (red, white, blue, yellow, black).

And worse is the lack of a decent "Window System". Using the back of headlight bricks for the Ole Kirk House was at best cringe-worthy, at worst.... sad. LEGO used to have a "system" of 9 windows and 1 door that could be assembled in a combination of multiple window sizes that number over 30. Today you are lucky to find more than 2 or 3 window types in the same color, forget about 9 or 30. Sad that the worlds most successful building toy utterly fails in the windows department, except when you use gimmicks such as headlight bricks, or sometimes SNOT techniques to get a semi-satisfying result. Not since 1987 has TLG produced a window system that could mix and match. Rant over.... maybe by the time they hit 100 years they'll get their System back to the way it was decades ago! :-)

Also... LEGO wheels were introduced in April of 1962.

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By in United Kingdom,

Another controversial one because some like the added challenge, but I'd say having numbered bags was a big innovation! Particularly for larger sets. And also if you've got limited space you don't want to have to pour everything out at once.

I would also say Lego's General presence leading shortly up to and after the Lego Movie has been an innovation itself - before, I got the impression other adults found it crazy that I would be collecting and building a 'kid's toy' but since around that time Lego as an adult hobby has become far more accepted, plus awareness of Lego was probably raised massively to kids everywhere.

Lego's next big innovation will be a factory that ideas can't be leaked out of...

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By in United States,

Happy Birthday LEGO!

I think the best thing to happen to LEGO was it's switch to story driven content. Starting with BIONICLE they've managed to keep each original IP fresh and interesting with fun characters and locations, and tons of drama and dark themes for the more mature fans. BIONICLE defined how LEGO would handle stories on the future leading to such great things as Ninjago and The LEGO Movies.

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By in United States,

I agree with TheBrickPal. BIONICLE was my life, and still is really.

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By in United States,

Happy Birthday to Lego, one of my very favorite past times as a kid, and probably my favorite hobby of adulthood! I have so many fond memories I couldn't pretend to go into them all, but I will say being a kid in the 80s-90s was a magical time, and a great time to be into Lego! I remember waiting anxiously to get the newest catalogs in the mail, and dreaming of all the sets I wanted. I remember saving up money so when I went to the store with my mom or dad, I could pick out a set, no matter how small. I remember the excitement of birthdays and receiving the "big set" that was on my wishlist all year, and spending the next several days and nights building and playing with them. I remember all the magical moments of stories forged, worlds created, and adventure that was had. I remember a childhood full of wonder and excitement, thanks in large part to this beloved toy. I will always remember Lego, and now I get to pass on my memories, excitement, and love to my children. Thank you for being such a fond part of my life, and for continuing to be for my children, and I hope for their children to come!

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By in United States,

The introduction of Minifigures has been the most welcome from my perspective

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By in Switzerland,

Flick fire missiles of course. ;)

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By in Australia,

I would love to say the invention of the current minifigure but I would have to say Godfred's redesign of the Lego brick to the current design (adding tubes on the underside of bricks) is the most welcome design.

(and I am not just saying this because Jangbricks said it)

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By in United Kingdom,

I think maybe licenses. Just because having a set target gives lego designers the push to include more details and interesting techniques to achieve what they're looking for. Just compare the level of detail in a star wars ship compared to, say, galaxy squad. Or a speed champions car compared to city. And they introduced loads of useful new parts.

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By in Germany,

Interesting to see that there are so many Bionicle / Constraction fans. I never understood the reason behind those themes nor did I ever have any interest in them and still haven't. Might have to do with the fact that I was right in my dark ages when Bionicle came out. Or the fact that you can't really build much with those parts. But I'm more of a buildings and vehicles guy anyway. I didn't even know it saved Lego from bankruptcy. I thought that was the introduction of Star Wars related sets.
Anyway, my favorite "innovation" was the introducion of the articulated minifig and the three classic themes - City, Space and Castle in the late 70s. Many happy childhood memories :-)
On that note, I think @eggbert20 described it perfectly. I couldn't have said it better.

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By in Netherlands,

I think that the system was the highlight of TLG. Just look at the sets from the 80's and the 90's. TLG has experimented with city on several levels. There were more sets that would make your city a real city. Now you have Police, fire department and returning series within City in a new cloth.

Other example is Castle. Castle was (for some people) in 1984-1986 boring, but the inclusion of Black Knights and Forestmen was impressive and created more dynamics in the theme. That led to a fantasy era from 1993 to 1996. The Fright Knights was probably the worst sub theme, but the idea behind it is brilliant.

We had a few series of Pirates sets, but the oldest series are far more superior than the ones from 2009-2010 and 2015. There was more variation in the 90's.

The only Western series was in the 90's and we had the Adventurers in 1998. Great themes and all in the Lego System years.

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By in Australia,

I would have to say the minifigure in 1978. There were two earlier attempts at introducing Lego figures (the maxifig and the stiff minifig) but both were limited in their playability. The always smiling (at least initially) minifig with their movable arms and legs, along with their claw like hands that could hold things, really brought the sets to life. And while there has been some cosmetic enhancements and variations, the basic design has endured now for nearly 40 years.

For me personally, it was the minifig that started my love for Lego as a child. I would have got my first Lego around 1975 or 1976, and I only had a handful of sets until 1978 when the first sets with minifigs were introduced. After that my interest in Lego really took off until going into my dark age in 1984.

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By in Poland,

It has to be 10k+ pcs UCS Falcon... I mean the third one, in 2027 ;-)

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By in Norway,

@eggbert20 Amen! So well writtten! Totally recall all the childhood memories :)

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By in United Kingdom,

It has to be going from wooden toys to bricks.

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By in United States,

I'd say the increased diversity of brick shapes and all the ingenious ways they can be combined.

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By in Netherlands,

What I liked about Lego? That I could build things from my imagination. One day I would build a city. The next day I would be building pirate ships or spaceships from the same pieces. Or even Transformers. Off course I started before all the licensed products came into play.
Today I buy the odd set but I really don't build anything anymore like I used to when I was a kid.

And my memories aren't complete without fondly remembering my cat walk through my Lego-city.
Or my last cat laying down next to my Winter Village under the christmas tree.

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By in Austria,

DUPLO of course... the first step into your own imaginary world... everything changes with your first brick, kiss ... ; )

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By in United Kingdom,

Technic wheels.

Classic Space had been "getting by" on 4-stud wide, fixed metal axel vehicles for 3 years before 6927 All Terrain Vehicle introduced bigger wheels on technic axels that allowed vehicles to be 6 studs wide or more.

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By in Canada,

All depends on your point of view, for me;

As a techie it would be the ElementID and DesignID

From a business aspect it would be the remodeling/structure of the company in the mid 2000s...the company nearly went bankrupt (and if is didn't change would no longer exist)

As a builder its tough but I would say 1) Brick (interlocking system) 2) vast variety of pieces 3) SNOT building techniques

As and AFOL the large D2C sets

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By in United Kingdom,

For me, personally, it would be the minifigure. That turned LEGO from toy bricks into a hugely inclusive play system.

For LEGO themselves - commercially - it was probably (a) dumping Jack Stone and all the bad ideas of the time and (b) getting the Star Wars licence.

From the global point of view, I think it's the Friends line that is still in the process of making the biggest difference to how LEGO is perceived. I know there were girls several years older than intended buying Duplo just for the Disney Princesses, so I imagine for them that first seeing Friends and then Disney Friends was akin to me discovering minifigs, and then Classic Space, many many years ago!

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By in Denmark,

Buying their first molding machine

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By in United States,

I agree with BrickPal. Constraction is great.

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By in United States,

LEGO's 3 movies, which have attracted more fans and caused many great new elements to be released (e.g. The 1x1x2 brick, Robin's hair, Lloyd's hair...)

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By in United States,

What I think which of the many innovations made throughout LEGO's history has been the most welcome from my perspective is it's first video game: Lego Island. It gives the player full interaction and freedom. It's got an excellent storyline, great cutscenes, and a cast of colorful characters.

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By in Sweden,

It's got to be the minifig. Fascinating how they got the iconic shape, proportions and smiley just right from the beginning. Let's hope the employee who invented it received a bonus.

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By in Singapore,

It's the minifig for me. My very first Lego purchase was the Darth Maul minifig from a toy shop. From then on, it sparked an obsession. It brings life to the sets, not to mention that the design and printing of the minifig continues to push the boundaries.

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By in France,

Lego Ideas. And more generally the way they interact with and help create the community. Without all the fan creations or indeed the debate and discussion surrounding the Ideas site and other sites/blogs etc, i honestly do not think they would be where they are today and still progressing. This process is at the heart of innovation and Lego have managed to create a community that consistently incubates ideas and fosters creativity at all levels.

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By in Slovakia,

Invention of modified bricks 1x1 with headlight, 1x2 masonry profile bricks and modified plates 1x2 with 1 Stud with Groove. I love those pieces :)

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By in Canada,

For me it was technic.
On the other hand, I have never understood what kids/ people like about bionicle and all those other weird figures. Our kids got some off those sets for their birthdays in the past they did not like them at all. Non off the pieces in those set you could use for anything else.

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By in Belgium,

Without the minifigs, Lego wouldn't be the same for me... I have no interest at all in the sets before 1978, but from the start of the minifig... Lego became the most awesome and important toy for me, :)

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By in United Kingdom,

^^ it might be a challenge but there are plenty of builders out there who've found ingenious ways to use constraction parts in System builds. Plus, there are some real constraction enthusiasts can make some really good constraction style characters and vehicles with various parts from Slizer to Star Wars.

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By in United States,

EVERYBRICKINTHING!!!!!!!!!!!

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