Mbriks: Magnetic bricks on Kickstarter

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View image at flickr

A new project has just launched on Kickstarter to produce LEGO-compatible magnetic bricks, called Mbriks.

Bricks with magnets in them are nothing new but these have been designed to be easily incorporated into your models and to affix to magnetically receptive surfaces on all six sides, which makes them extremely versatile, allowing for building in all directions.

I've been sent a sample of the patent-pending blocks to try out.


The box I received contains four magnetic bricks but those available via Kickstarter will contain six.

View image at flickr

Left to their own devices they will attach to each other.

View image at flickr

I had to use Blu-Tac to prevent them doing so to take this picture!

They are fully compatible with LEGO, taller than a normal brick: 1 brick and 1 plate high.

View image at flickr

They are well made with no sharp corners, moulding seams or anything else. The magnet inside can move freely which enables the block to attach to another, or a magnetically receptive surface, on all six faces, even the top.

View image at flickr

Because the magnets can attach by any side you can incorporate them into your models any way you like, or use them to mount minifigures in a various ways, as I have here.

View image at flickr

A six-pack of magnets is said to be able to support models containing around 300 pieces, but a lot will depend on the friction of the surface. Here I've used four to mount Elsa BrickHeadz.

For maximum adhesion the magnets should be apart, otherwise their polarity is aligned with each other and not the board, hence using a 6x6 plate with one in each corner here.

View image at flickr

They can be easily incorporated into your models.

View image at flickr

They could also be used as a means of connecting sections of larger models together, but easily separable.

View image at flickr

Overall, then, they are pretty versatile and provide a neat means of displaying your models on the wall or fridge door.

The Kickstarter page provides these images to show what's possible with more imagination and time than I had yesterday when I took the photos above!


A single box of 6 can be yours for $12 / £9, or you can get two packs for $22 / £17, which seems reasonable given you don't need vast quantities of them. Packs containing magnetic boards and a bag of 'compatible blocks' are also available, starting at $25.

Head on over to Kickstarter to pledge your support: you have until November 23rd to do so.

Thanks to Evan for sending the bricks to review. All opinions expressed are my own.

28 comments on this article

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By in United Kingdom,

Nice might pick some of these up for displaying some models

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By in Greece,

Excellent on the fridge door!

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By in United Kingdom,

If all you are going to do is stick them on a fridge, you might as well poke/glue a small rare earth magnet into an existing LEGO brick. Much cheaper, and the brick is regular lego sized.

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By in Poland,

the big problem for me is the size that don't really fit into the system ;ppp what is this 1 1/3 tall brick

I would probably get some cheap off brand brick and just add a magnet or... as in the painting, glue that one or more off brand bricks... especially when I have a box of them already X"D

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By in Spain,

Magnet may be allowed, but glue should be absolutely forbidden in our plastic brick world!!
Interesting stuff with no further uses than the showed at the review, IMO...

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By in United Kingdom,

Like a lot of Kickstarter projects seems to be trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist.

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By in Australia,

I think these could be handy for joining modules together for displays, without the difficulty of fitting large numbers of technic pins into holes.

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By in United Kingdom,

Most toy-makers wouldn't make anything like this because of the now well-known risks of children swallowing a pair. I see these require an '8+' caution in the US. What about Europe?

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By in United Kingdom,

Pins aren't really that big a deal though, plus they are quite easy to hide since the bricks with pins on the side are proper lego colours and lego sized bricks.

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By in Switzerland,

let's face it, makes more sense than the hats than can be built on :D

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By in Australia,

@Joefish: I don't know how it works in the UK, but in Australia, laws were brought in to prevent children being badly hurt if they swallowed small magnets. But magnets are fine in toys if they are inside other components of a safe size and quality. Also Aussies can still buy, import, etc tiny magnets for manufacturing, hobbies, electronics or whatever, because there is an expectation that grown ups will supervise kids in those activities.

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By in United States,

That’s a large box for four bricks.

brobert: I’d use the hat much more than I would use these.

Brickset: I’d be interested in a poll based around these LEGO-compatible Kickstarter’s to see which ones the community things are the most useful.

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By in United States,

Been looking for something like this for awhile now... These look well-made and better than anything I could make on my own. Why not, gonna give it a shot.

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By in United States,

This looks awesome! I live in a crowded NYC apartment and my would love for my kids to be able to build on vertical surfaces like this (and not have to clean it up their creations right after!). Can't wait to pledge and get some for the kiddos for the holidays!

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By in United Kingdom,

Err - @Bgrove - wouldn't it be cheaper to just screw a baseplate to the wall?
Then again, price of baseplates lately...

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By in United States,

What a fun invention! I love the idea of displaying little lego scenes throughout the house in various, off-the-floor places. Can't wait to get a few sets, and look forward to hearing/seeing how others use them

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By in Canada,

Interesting. I will not be availing myself of the obvious benefits of this system as it will probably be deemed as an illegal technique. However, for those who don't care about that, this is a great concept!

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By in United Kingdom,

Shipping's disappointingly expensive to the UK. They had me for a starter pack until then, plus the inevitable customs charge to kick it up a bit more.

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By in United Kingdom,

This is a nice solution to a problem that nobody has.

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By in Hungary,

Would it be possible to make a lego model levitate above a magnetic levitation pad with these? What do you think? It would be really useful in some MOCs, for example the star destroyer above Jeddha city MOC.

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By in United States,

@FARLANDER glue in our plastic world exists
closer and more often than you think! Look at LEGO and Merlin Entertainment (i.e. Legoland) as prime official examples. They use metal internal support frames along with company specified *gasp* glue to affix their large and/or outdoor creations.

Personally the magnetic bricks look like a good idea. I love 3D modular buildings as an art painting of sorts. The only thing that gets me is price and the kind of off sizing which I'm guessing is for the patent reasons. You could certainly comparably find a bulk of tiny rare Earth magnets and find a way to affix them without glue.

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By in United Kingdom,

What PoMoPink said. $14 P&P for a $9 item is ridiculous!

It takes the total over the VAT + duty + £8 post office charge threshold, so you'll wind up paying about £31 for four bricks. No, thank you.

They could have minimised that completely legally if they had used a shipping consolidator such as Ship Naked but they decided not to. I won't be backing this project.

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By in China,

An interlocking brick system with a magnet to make it "to affix to magnetically receptive surfaces on all six sides"

Agreed with others, best fit on the fridge door!

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By in United States,

@cselenka: I would guess not. Since the magnets can move freely inside the bricks, their poles would align. Shame, really, because that sounds like a cool idea.

Overall, it's an interesting idea; why white and light blue, though? Black would be so much more versatile. (Or maybe black and red, because M-Tron.)

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By in Norway,

Cselenka: Unfortunately I don't think that's possible, according to some killjoy's theorem it's impossible to stably levitate an object using a static setup of permanent ferromagnets. You either need some moving/revolving part (like the "Levitron" spinning top), an electromagnetic setup (which requires energy), a superconducting coil (requiring extreme cooling) or a diamagnetic material like bismuth or pyrolytic graphite (which produces a very weak repulsive force).

As others have said I'm not sold on this product either (the odd colors and rounded corners doesn't really help), I'd rather buy some 5mm round neodymium magnets - being close to the same diameter as a stud it's possible to lodge them inside the bricks in various ways without using glue.

Too bad about the magnetic toys hysteria, especially as it seems to have been just yet another media-driven scare with little substance (how many kids are REALLY harmed or needs treatment from eating magnets?). AFAIK the problem is limited to the very smallest and most powerful neodymium magnets, things like the old-style Lego magnets really don't pose much of a risk. In the US it turned into an utter witch-hunt focusing on one single company - the makers of the "Buckyballs" magnetic spheres - while dozens of other identical toys were left untouched. The end result was yet another law, one more thing our toys weren't allowed to do, one more step in the dumbing down of society.

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By in United Kingdom,

Hmm, not sure about this, seems to go against the brick connection system, almost cheating!!

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By in Australia,

@Ageleng: the magnet swallowing problem was not hysteria. Hospitals around the world reported several cases each year in the 2000s. Actual children were seriously hurt. Laws were enacted to prevent this. The laws were pretty sensible because they did not forbid those magnets in other areas like hobbies and electronics because it was expected that children would be closely supervised around those things. If you think that was a witch hunt you need to read more widely.

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By in Norway,

I was mostly thinking of how we've had magnetic toys for DECADES without problems before it suddenly became a big issue in the 2000's, this makes me believe it's either a media hysteria or strictly an issue with the newest and strongest magnets. And while the laws definitely could've been worse they still seem to have affected Lego negatively, as they've replaced the older more versatile magnets with a limited-use train coupler piece (which only matches European-style buffer-and-chain couplers).

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