The LEGO Creations of Victor Frankenstein

Posted by ,

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein was published in 1818 and the epistolary novel is celebrating its 200th anniversary this year. Several versions of Victor Frankenstein and his monstrous creation have appeared in LEGO sets during the last two decades, at a variety of different scales.

Explore the history of Frankenstein's monster in LEGO, along with some interesting figures which take inspiration from its amoral creator, after the break...

1382 Scary Laboratory

Several popular monsters were introduced to LEGO for the first time in 2002, as the Studios theme started to focus upon Horror movies! The first rendition of Frankenstein's monster appeared in 1382 Scary Laboratory and this minifigure captures several of the character's traditional features, including the enlarged head that was popularised by 1931's Frankenstein film. A maniacal scientist is included as well, presumably taking some inspiration from Victor Frankenstein's portrayal in the movie.


MMMB029 Monster

The monster from Mary Shelley's original novel is described as a creature of grotesque contrast but its modern appearance was defined by Boris Karloff's famed portrayal from the 1931 film. This Monthly Mini Model Build from 2010 is based upon that source and includes a pair of 1x1 round plates that represent either ears or bolts in either side of the figure's neck.


8804-7 The Monster

The fourth series of Collectable Minifigures included three different horror characters, the first of whom is The Monster. This marvelllous minifigure bears some resemblance to its predecessor from 2002, featuring the same sand green skin tone and a head that consists of two pieces, but is more detailed. I particularly like the bandages over its scars and the monster's sunken eyes.


8804-16 Crazy Scientist

Victor Frankenstein was portrayed as a tragic figure in Mary Shelley's novel but the many subsequent versions of the character have fluctuated between amorality and overt madness. The Crazy Scientist from the fourth series of Collectable Minifigures is evidently inspired by the latter version, featuring a wild hairstyle, a pair of bright pink goggles and an evil facial expression!


9466 The Crazy Scientist & His Monster

The Monster Fighters theme includes an impressive selection of classic monsters, among whom are a mad scientist and his twisted creation. These minifigures are very similar to their Collectable Minifigure counterparts and the scientist's laboratory is reminiscent of 1382 Scary Laboratory. Both models include the famous Tesla coils that were used in 1931's Frankenstein as well as a selection of frightening artefacts.


10228 Haunted House

Frankenstein's monster provided inspiration for the character of Lurch from The Addams Family, who served as butler to the eponymous household. A similar character appears in 10228 Haunted House, featuring light bluish grey skin and wearing a remarkably tidy dress coat. Presumably this is another creation of the Crazy Scientist from 9466 The Crazy Scientist & His Monster.


PAB9-1 Monster

LEGO released a selection of Pick-A-Brick models during 2012, all of which were primarily constructed using 2x2 and 2x4 bricks. PAB9-1 Monster is probably the simplest such model but is still recognisable as Frankenstein's monster, including two 1x2 bricks with Technic pins that represent bolts in its neck as well as a reasonably traditional colour scheme.


40104 Frankenstein's Monster

A second Monthly Mini Model Build representing Frankenstein's monster was produced in 2014. This model is constructed at the scale of Miniland figures and looks good to me. LEGO is an ideal medium for capturing the angular head which has become an iconic element of the monster's design, hence the release of so many brick-built models depicting this character!


71010-3 Monster Scientist

Series 14 of the Collectable Minifigures was focused entirely upon horror characters and includes the Monster Scientist. Like his predecessors from the Studios and Monster Fighters themes, there are no official links between this figure and Victor Frankenstein, although every mad scientist can potentially trace inspiration to Mary Shelley's novel of 1818. Furthermore, it seems likely that this figure is responsible for the creation of the next character on our list.


71010-12 Monster Rocker

Frankenstein's monster might not traditionally be associated with music, although Lurch can be seen playing a harpsichord during the opening credits for The Addams Family. However, the Monster Rocker is evidently a skilled musician, carrying a red guitar which is decorated with a bat motif. His olive green skin tone is unique and this monster seems much friendlier than its many predecessors.


TRUFrank-1 Frankenstein's Monster

Another brick-built rendition was produced for Toys R Us stores in 2016. This model consists of just 37 pieces but is instantly recognisable as the famed monster, wearing the coat which was popularised by Sir Christopher Lee's performance in 1957's The Curse of Frankenstein. Modern incarnations of the creature often sport a similar jacket so it is perhaps surprising that LEGO minifigures and models have rarely included this garment.


Which is your favourite version of Victor Frankenstein or his famous monster released to date? Let us know in the comments and have a happy Hallowe'en!

 

Sponsored content

19 comments on this article

Gravatar
By in Canada,

It's been too long since one of these articles has come out. Love it!

Gravatar
By in United States,

FRANK-EN-STEEN not Frankenstein for respect to the late Gene Wilder. ;)

Gravatar
By in Canada,

200 years of Frank-en-steen (@xboxtravis7992) who knew Brickset would be so educational. Now then where is "I-gore" with my copy of that book.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Agreed. Very interesting. Thanks Capn!

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

There is a Monster Rocker minifig in the cauldron for tonight's trick or treaters- along with a few other minifigs & the usual sweets

Gravatar
By in Poland,

Zabkowice Slaskie, but I guess that only Polish will understand that not so funny joke.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Quite Like Monster Rocker..

Gravatar
By in United States,

"Please sir, walk this way..." Eye-gore 1974

Gravatar
By in Canada,

10228 is on my dream list.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I remember reading a designer's comments saying that instead of stitches, they used bandages on the S4 Frank, and safety pins on the Monster Fighters Lab Frank because the stitches could be frightening to young kids. And yet both of those minifigs also have stitches across the upper chest, and the S14 rocker Frank _does_ have stitches across the forehead, so apparently they're not super committed to that line of reasoning.

I don't think he's necessarily the best one, but I am a bit partial to the S4 Frank because S4 was on shelves when I decided to start building a hunger of zombies, and rather than pay through the nose for more S1 Zombies, I was able to buy a small pile of Franks at MSRP to help fill out the group.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I love articles like this and think you should do more!

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

My favourite is 8804-7 The Monster, though I have a certain fondness for MMMB029 too. It's one of those little models I have that's been built and never dismantled since. :o)

Gravatar
By in United States,

A nice little look through the adaptations of the story. I appreciate you including notes on both the Scientist *and* the Monster, it brings some extra quality to the post.

Gravatar
By in United States,

As someone who actually read the novel, I'll never not be irritatted by Hollywood's perversion of the source material, best exemplified by the vast majority of people who falsely associate the name Frankenstein with the monster.

Gravatar
By in Canada,

^ Meh. I read the novel. I can't say this bothers me.

Gravatar
By in United States,

@Samed, while it is true that Mary Shelley never applied the name Frankenstein to the creature, it is worth noting that he considered himself the son of Victor Frankenstein. As such, it’s not entirely unreasonable to assume that he would consider the surname his own.

Gravatar
By in United States,

@SearchinglightRG, that's true, but the monster never referred to himself as possessing the name Frankenstein. And Frankenstein only ever named his creation with derogatories such as wretch and monster. I think what most irritates me about Hollywood's take on the novel is how the monster's "iconic" look does not in the slightest represent the character as he was visually depicted in the novel.

Gravatar
By in Germany,

really cool article! just realised the birthday of mary shelly Novell cause of the article! but in one point i disagree. i dont think the mad scientist in series 14 is connected to the rocker monster. i think he and the fly monster belong together, or the fly is his other form after drinking his little bottle. maybe like a lego version of „the fly „ =D

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

+++LORD OF THE RINGS SPOILER ALERT+++

@Samed, I empathise with your frustration at Hollywood's misrepresentation of source material and the resulting distortion of the public's perception. A few examples that really bug me:
- that vampires can be killed with a crossbow bolt. In Bram Stoker's 'Dracula', the stake required is described and would be much larger than could be shot from a crossbow.
- that Wolverine is American and tall. He isn't. He is Canadian and short.
- that Tolkien was making a political point when he had Éowyn kill the Witch King of Angmar. He wasn't. He was making a philological point.

In the interest of full disclosure, I admit to having some of the minifigures in the article in my display collection.

Return to home page »