Interview with Murray Andrews, Hidden Side Designer

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View image at flickr

Hidden Side is not being launched until August but has already elicited discussion, including at LEGO's annual report event in the LEGO House during February. Brickset was kindly invited to interview Murray Andrews, a developer of the theme, so we could find out more about how Hidden Side might differ from other ranges.

Our discussion topics included the integration between physical and digital play, the potential longevity of the theme and why the sets do not contain ghostly minifigures. You can read his responses to these questions, along with many others, after the break...

Brickset: What is your role within The LEGO Group?

Murray: I am a senior product lead, predominantly working on products where we are seeking to unite physical bricks and a digital experience. LEGO possesses inherent qualities but there is an opportunity to enhance them with emerging technologies, especially as children become increasingly engaged with digital play. That concept provided the basis for Hidden Side.

Brickset: What can you tell us about Hidden Side?

Murray: The theme is focused upon the fictional town of Newbury, where our central characters have noticed some unusual occurrences. Invisible ghosts are haunting the town and they can only be seen through an app, developed by Professor JB, which forms an integral part of the play experience. This app can be downloaded for direct interaction with the models, hopefully augmenting the existing play value offered by each set.


View image at flickr

We therefore ensured that every model includes the consistent detail and functionality that one would expect to enjoy in any LEGO set. For example, 70425 High School, can shift between a typical school and its possessed state by revealing angled eyes, a cavernous mouth and deadly claws on each side! The app can then reveal further detail and allows us to see which ghosts are haunting the school.

Brickset: How does the app interact with the sets?

Murray: Each model includes a colour wheel, corresponding with the respective colour spectrums that are inhabited by the ghosts. Scanning the different colours will reveal possession points and potentially release a ghost which you can then capture through a mini game. Furthermore, the app will sometimes indicate that you should place a minifigure onto the set, perhaps discovering that characters have been possessed! We can therefore transition between exploration and action-based play very quickly.

We also want to continue expanding the experience by introducing more ghosts and special events after the product launch. For instance, we might unleash a new group of ghosts across the range to coincide with Hallowe'en, hopefully prolonging digital play in the same way that physical LEGO sets can be enjoyed for a long period of time.

Brickset: Do you expect the theme to have some longevity, in that case?

Murray: Absolutely, the range is launching in August but we already have plans to release new sets next year. We cannot reveal very much at the moment but some exciting additions to the augmented reality are in development and we expect to provide further information as 2020 draws nearer, relating to the sets, the app and the story of Hidden Side.

Brickset: The app requires some fairly advanced hardware to play. How did you decide which devices would be supported?

Murray: As you might imagine, we investigated this subject extensively and established that mobile devices would require ARKit for iOS users and ARCore for Android to enable this augmented reality gameplay. Phones with that capability were introduced about five years ago and we found that most children in our primary markets do have access to them. It is certainly an important consideration so that was a central subject during development.

View image at flickr

Brickset: Was the Hidden Side range developed around the augmented reality app or did the theme come first?

Murray: I was not actually involved in the earliest stages of development but we have been thinking about augmented reality within LEGO for a while. A ghostly realm is ideally suited to that kind of play and Hidden Side therefore seemed like an excellent opportunity to introduce an app that is integrated with the sets. I am not entirely certain which idea came first but would imagine the Hidden Side theme was probably created some time after the app was already under consideration.

Brickset: There has been some discussion surrounding a lack of physical ghosts in the sets. Did you consider including the ghosts as actual minifigures?

Murray: I think we have always intended to keep the ghosts as an invisible presence which can only become visible through the app. Children find that makes sense from a story perspective so that was probably the correct decision, although I can also understand why some people may be disappointed not to have physical minifigures.

View image at flickr

Of course, there is evidence of the ghosts' presence as you can swap the heads on some minifigures, representing their possessed state, or even possess certain objects such as the high school or a tree from 70420 Graveyard. Hopefully fans searching for a physical play experience will appreciate those features, especially since previous haunted themes such as Monster Fighters or Studios have been more focused upon physical threats so Hidden Side is distinctive in that regard.

Brickset: Many thanks for taking the time to speak with us!

46 comments on this article

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By in United States,

I've been fixing up my old Monster Fighters sets (and trying to find a good deal on that Haunted House I missed!) in preparation for this theme, glad to hear it's got at least two waves!

Perhaps a way to fix the non-physical ghost complaints would be to release a ghost only CMF to army build them? LEGO'd probably have to make it a side series and not a regular one (kinda like what they did with Unikitty) so a regular CMF could come out at the same time, but it might make a good excuse. I am personally going to stock up on Banshee and Specters from Series 14 to scatter around the sets.

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By in United States,

I missed out on Monster Fighters when it came out, so I am really excited for this theme!

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By in United States,

I am looking forwards to that School Bus, ironic that school starts at August here.

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By in United States,

I’ll probably get the boat just to test it out, but I’m pretty uninterested in this theme as a whole. Still, great interview!

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By in Canada,

They should release along a polybag with 2-3 ghosts for those wishing to add "real" ghosts to the displayed sets.

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By in Norway,

Great interview! Can’t wait for these! <3 Looking forward to try the sets with the app but will buy all the sets for the sets themselves.

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By in United Kingdom,

Wait, so this requires ARCore or ARCkit to use the app. Its actually any phone after 2017 that can run this (not 5 years ago) so the majority of people won't be able to use the app without paying for a hefty phone upgrade?

That if anything confirms my suspicion that this is a 'cashing in' theme rather then a 'new play experience' theme.

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By in United States,

I made my own set for hidden side. NOT OFFICIAL OR COMPATIBLE It is a cement mixer that when possessed, can shoot hidden cement globs. It has a teenager minifig and a construction worker that can become possessed. When it does, It's face changes and it grows two attachable tentacles.

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By in New Zealand,

@GrizBe you are right. Even my phone which does support Android 8 doesn't support ARCore so I still can't use it. I wonder how many people are going to buy this and then realise they can't use the app because their phone just isn't good enough. Could be a risky move and turn some customers off the product all together.
LEGO have been trying to do digital stuff for ages now with a very limited amount of success to my eye. Do we really need to keep encouraging the use of digital devices?

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By in United States,

So...I was kind of excited about these, but now? I will probably get a few to add to the Halloween display we do every year. But I guess I will need to luck into a phone capable of the app to experience the play features and see what my kids think of it. It seems like a good idea and I think it has a lot of potential with other themes like star wars, just might be a few years too early with costs of phones capable of running the programs. Guess we will see.

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By in United States,

I feel like a lot of the concerns about the theme not having ghost minifigures fail to acknowledge that if it had not been designed around the premise of the ghosts being invisible to the naked eye, it would have almost certainly had ghosts IN PLACE of the possessed and non-possessed civilian characters. After all, the number of minifigures in each set is not unusual for their price. And it's not as though the Monster Fighters theme, which this has been compared to, had ANY civilian minifigures, structures, or builds — just ones strictly related to the heroes or villains.

As my brother pointed out to me a couple days ago, in the past it's been typical to see a lot of praise for action/adventure related sets like #7189-1, #8970-1, #70607-1, and #70620-1 that prominently feature civilian vehicles, minifigures, or structures that can be easily adapted for use in more realistic and less theme-specific historic and modern-day displays. Conversely, other Ninjago, Agents, Castle, and Nexo Knights sets have often been criticized for focusing too narrowly on "good guy" versus "bad guy" conflicts, often focusing on fantastical theme-specific minifigures, structures, and vehicles at the expense of fleshing out the worlds they inhabit.

As such, it's surprising that here an even greater emphasis on versatile civilian characters and structures has resulted in a sort of backlash or a feeling that buyers are being cheated because civilians appear in place of more Ninjago or Nexo Knights-esque villains. I wonder if it's just the existence of app-only ghosts that are creating this expectation of getting more in the sets themselves, and that if there were no app people would not be thinking of these extremely varied "possessed" minifigures as a way of cheating people out of "real" ghosts.

After all, so far, the digital-only ghosts are not much different than we've seen from the ghosts already released in Ninjago, Ghostbusters, and blind-bag Minifigures series since 2015, only with all the more varied or interesting clothing and character traits stripped away in favor of more generic and repetitive "slime monster" faces and torso patterns. And while I can see the appeal of such character designs, I don't see how they'd be more interesting than the much more varied and versatile figures actually appearing in many of these sets.

@GrizBe: All iPhone models since the 6S (launched in September 2015) have ARKit pre-installed, so I don't think his statement about when compatible phones were first introduced is too big an exaggeration (even if it wasn't until much later that ARCore-certified devices started coming out).

And I doubt LEGO is going into this blind — it'd surprise me if they didn't look at actual statistics on how many and what kinds of devices are typically used to download and play other kid-targeted app games — including their own already released ARCore and ARKit apps — before arriving at the conclusion that most kids in their primary markets had access to devices that could run the app, or at least were projected to by the time of the theme's release.

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By in United States,

@Pizzareno: It's not a matter of "encouraging the use of digital devices". The use of digital devices is already near-universal among kids. For example, as of 2015, 95% of kids in the United States had a computer at home, 89% had home access to a handheld computer or smartphone, and 69% had home internet access: https://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2018/04/gap_home_internet_computer_access_study.html

It's a little absurd to think that LEGO is creating products and apps like this for 8 to 14 year olds who don't already play computer or video games, rather than to create new forms of LEGO play that resonate with the numerous kids whose hobbies already include some form of digital gaming.

What's more, most of the safety or developmental risks associated with gaming are related to mature content in those games, unmoderated online social interactions, or in-app microtransactions that reward addictive tendencies or a gambling mentality. This game contains none of those things, so I don't see why it should be any more cause for alarm than Game Boy games like Tetris, Super Mario Land, or Pokémon were in the 90s.

If you think LEGO hasn't had much success with "digital stuff", I don't think you've paid too close attention. For example, many of the LEGO video games from Tt games have had amazing sales (sometimes even compared to Star Wars/DC/Marvel video games that aren't connected with the LEGO brand) and garnered positive critical feedback and awards. A lot of LEGO's online content such as their website, apps, and YouTube channel have also been remarkably popular, especially among kids — for example, the LEGO Nexo Knights Merlok 2.0 app, LEGO Ninjago Ride Ninja app, LEGO City app, and LEGO Duplo Train app all have more than 10 million installs on Android and are rated 4/5 stars or higher on both the Google Play store and the App Store. The LEGO Juniors Create & Cruise app has similar ratings with over 100 million installs from Google Play.

LEGO has certainly had more mixed success with some of their more experimental initiatives like LEGO Universe, LEGO Fusion, or LEGO Design byME, but as long as they're not bleeding money I can't fathom why that should mean they should completely give up on experimenting with new forms of digital engagement in order to take some of their past digital successes even further and integrate them even more closely with the traditional LEGO play experience.

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By in United States,

I’m disappointed. I was looking forward to the app, but my phone
(An SE) does not support ARKit:(

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By in Australia,

I ... don't own a smart phone. Nor do I care to start owning one.

I suppose I'm just one of those old-fashioned types who assumes the play value in a Lego set is actually the Lego set. I do like the designs of some of the sets, and I will absolutely be considering the train (just because it's a train, and like any starving, desperate Lego train fan, I'll absolutely take whatever scraps Lego decides to throw out).

But I still don't really expect the theme to last very long.

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By in United States,

My phone must not be smart enough. It doesn’t have a kindergarten diploma.

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By in United Kingdom,

@Aanchir: Your wrong there. ARCkit was only launched with, and compatable with ios 11, and ios 11 wasn't launched until June 2017.

Hence my statement of 'Phones older then 2 years' holds true to that as you'd have to upgrade an older phone to run it.

Also, I've seen plenty of apps on kids toys and games that say they're compatable with X, Y and Z phone and/or opperating system, and still fail to download or work properly.

Going off my friends kids though, who have ipads etc. If they're using them its to play games directly on them when on the sofa or one long car journeys etc. So I doubt they'd want to have to interact with the lego set to just play the game where they can get games that don't need addition interaction.

As is it seems you need to have the set in view at all times to use any of the AR features, or play the capture game.... and how many kids do you know that are going to want to sit still with their device points directly as a lego set just to play with it?

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By in Italy,

It's the future, guys. Soon our old-fashioned Lego sets won't be worth a penny... Unless they get "augmented".

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By in Australia,

"It's the future, guys. Soon our old-fashioned Lego sets won't be worth a penny... Unless they get "augmented"."

Good. Then maybe I won't have to pay thousands of dollars for old 9V train sets.

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By in United States,

Lego didn’t go into this blindly, as the interview clearly stated. They did research amongst the market they’re aiming for. It’s alway a gamble trying something rather new, but I promise they didn’t throw a dart on the wall and watched where it landed. And they didn’t base their decision based on what their friends’ kids do...

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By in United States,

@Aanchir on the note of the civilian things, LEGO fans just straight up don't know what they want. For years they've complained about the cartoony look of NBA, Clone Wars, EXO-Froce, ect. But the second Flintstones decides to do their figures in LEGO's original style everyone is up in arms. There's an old saying that "you can't please everyone" and especially with AFOLs I see that run true.

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By in United Kingdom,

@monkyby87: Seriously have to throw snarky remarks to try and get a reaction huh?

I'll clarify by 'friends kids', I've meant multiple friends, not just one couple. And their kids range in ages from 3 up to 16 now. Admittedly its a rather small sample of 19 kids over both genders and the age range, but they all still have used their devices in similar ways which is what causes my doubt.

I don't make my statements based on one thing to try and show others up.

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By in United States,

I hate to be the one saying it, but I think this is headed to be a major failure. I think that most people like sets that you build, then display or play with.

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By in Canada,

For those that saying "people ask for sets to build / display / play with" - what's stopping from 100% ignore the app ? The sets are complete as they are, can be used to create a Halloween theme section of a Lego city, or a carnival/amusement park. Each set has a "scene" to play with, they're all very displayable and comes with unique mini figures. How is it any difference than "Monster Hunters" ? Even if the app is amazing, the sets will outlive it anyway.

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By in United States,

@The Teenage Brickster: Really? All the sites I found (such as this one: https://www.apple.com/ios/augmented-reality/) say iPhone SE supports ARKit.

@GrizBe: Hardware requirements are different than software requirements, and keeping the OS up to date is much more normal among iOS users than Android users. The question of whether the app will work for people who haven't bought a phone in two years is totally valid, but it's ludicrous to think that LEGO is somehow doing their fans a disservice by not designing apps for families that not only have refused to install free software updates for their phone for two years straight, but also never intend on installing any such updates. That's like complaining about LEGO trains not working because you never intend to buy batteries for them — actually, even more ridiculous, because batteries cost money and iPhone software updates do not.

And I don't see how it's an issue to have the toy in your physical vicinity in order to play with it? That's normal for toys whether they have a tie-in app or not. It's not as though it's revolutionary to have toy-related digital games that require physical proximity to the toy. LEGO Mindstorms EV3, LEGO Boost, LEGO Powered Up, and LEGO Duplo have all already dabbled in that at this point, as have any number of non-LEGO-branded tech toys.

Heck, back in the 90s, LEGO Studios sets relied on a camera that only worked when physically plugged into a desktop computer! So whether or not this particular theme catches on, I can't imagine something as basic as "you need the toy to play with the toy" would be what turns out to be a deal-breaker.

@dingbat591: Of course! Everyone knows that if LEGO creates a successful gimmick or feature for one theme, it destroys the future value of any theme that didn't feature that same gimmick or feature. That also must be why the success of Fabuland in the 80s killed off every LEGO theme that didn't have storybook-style instruction manuals, or why the success of Bionicle in the early 2000s killed off every LEGO theme that didn't come in plastic storage canisters, or why the success of Ninjago in the past decade killed every LEGO theme that didn't come with spinners and trading cards. It's basic science.

Or maybe… and this might sound crazy… LEGO has always thrived on variety, and prefers giving new themes features that help them stand out over putting the exact same features in every set or theme.

@Ronny N: These ARE sets that you build, then display or play with. It's just they include both traditional AND digital modes of play.

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By in United Kingdom,

@elangab: Think the problem with 'ignoring the app' for those people is that without the app, there aren't any ghost minifigures in the sets despite it being a 'ghost hunting' theme.

I agree though about the sets. I just feel that the app has been developed as a 'gimic', the cost and development time of which could have been better put into the physical sets.

@Aanchir: Its more that they've designed it to only cater for those who have the money to shell out for modern smartphones, rather then to cater for as wide a market as possible. I don't know many people for instance, who'd have the money or the will to give their 5 year old the latest iPhone just to play with a lego set.

Also the app seems to rely on needing the device pointed at the set, not 'just near it', which was my point there. Its not like other AR attempts such as Dimensions where you simply had to scan the toy to use it in game... and we all know how that ended up.

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By in United States,

@GrizBe LEGO Dimensions wasn't AR, it was Toys to Life. Toys to Life take a physical object and bring it into a digital world, AR (Augmented Reality) takes a digital object and projects it into the physical world. Stuff like Pokemon Go is AR, while Skylanders is Toys to Life.

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By in United States,

Series 14 (and Dimensions) got me into Lego as an adult. I am really looking forward to these!

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By in United Kingdom,

@MatiNui2009: 'Toys to life' is defined as using toys or action figures to interact with a video game. This is doing exactly that. Your using a lego set to interact with a phone app video game. They're pretty much the exact same thing, just worded differently.

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By in United States,

This is not Toys to Life. This is Augmented Reality. As a Skylanders and Pokémon Go fan, I can confirm that there is a difference. If you’re unhappy with the app, you can still display and play with the sets without it. I’m really excited to see Lego venturing into what is becoming one of my favorite genres of video games!

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By in United States,

@GrizBe: As of 2017 (at least in the US, China, or the EU), the average smartphone user would keep their smartphone for fewer than 24 months before upgrading to a newer model or replacing it with a different brand: https://www.businessinsider.com/how-long-people-wait-to-upgrade-phones-chart-2017-3 So it seems plausible that most families with an iOS or Android device will have one new enough to run this type of VR software… at least, if they don't some kind of bizarre conscientious objection to updating their iPhone operating system at least once every two yearsl

And I think it's preposterous to think that only kids whose parents buy them their own smartphones or tablets will be using this or any other app, any more than that only kids whose parents buy them their own computer will use LEGO.com or kids whose parents buy them their own TV set will watch the Ninjago cartoon. Electronics like that are among the many things that often tend to be shared within households, particularly since it gives parents better control over the amount of time their kids spend in front of screens.

It's funny how whenever LEGO does something like app-connected products, Asia-exclusive sets, mini-dolls, video game based licensed themes, Netflix original series… basically, anything that's actually a new and groundbreaking thing for them, it tends to bring about concerns from Bricksetters that LEGO is excessively limiting their potential audience and threatening their reputation as a toy with universal appeal… and yet many of these same people scoff at statements from actual LEGO designers backed up by past sales and play test sessions that that there's not strong enough demand to support stuff like individual train car sets, re-releases of sets from the 80s and 90s, a steampunk theme, or — god forbid — MONORAILS.

And again, what is there about the possessed civilian minifigures and possessed vehicles/structures that makes them any less interesting or playable than if they were ordinary ghost minifigures with less interesting or varied features and outfits?

And um, no, that's not how "Toys to life" is defined. As Wikipedia states, "Toys-to-life is a video game feature using physical figurines or action figures to interact within the game. These toys use a near field communication (NFC), radio frequency identification (RFID), or image recognition data protocol to determine the individual figurine's proximity, and save a player's progress data to a storage medium located within that piece."

The Hidden Side sets do not feature any NFC or RFID technology, nor any type of digital data storage within the toys themselves. The primary forms of interaction involve physically playing with the playsets/scenes, not simply repositioning individual figurines or action figures. And as press releases and interviews about Hidden Side such as this one make clear, this is a reversal of the "game-first" design philosophy behind many AR and toys-to-life games in that here, the digital app is designed to enhance the physical play experience, not the other way around.

LEGO has already experimented with other types of augmented reality technology including the "Digital Box" screens in some LEGO stores, the LEGO AR Studio app released for iOS in 2017, the LEGO 3D Catalogue app on iOS and Android, and the LEGO AR Playgrounds app released for iOS last year. Most of these were much more sensory-oriented experiences that present animations of the sets and the characters who populate them without as many clearly defined gameplay objectives or a clearly defined storyline — far different from the "Toys to Life" genre.

But even though this uses a similar type of technology — one that happens to have recently become more widely available for home use — I think it's a more direct evolution of the Nexo Knights and Ultra Agents apps which invited kids to scan printed LEGO parts or control the cursor using buildable touchscreen widgets packaged within each individual set. Here, though, the entire set is used as part of the digital play experience, without that sense of sepa

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By in United States,

@aanchir can you keep your replies shorter, your long answers would be better suited in forums.

Murray’s comments remind me of Nexo Knight interview from 2016 in how LEGO is experimenting with physical sets merging with digital; https://youtu.be/6_i8jFrbOBA

I’m looking forward to getting these and building them with my 10 y/o son. He’ll likely be done with the app aspect relatively quickly then I’ll get the sets afterwards so win win for me; Time with my son and new LEGO.

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By in United States,

GrizBe wrote: “Think the problem with 'ignoring the app' for those people is that without the app, there aren't any ghost minifigures in the sets despite it being a 'ghost hunting' theme.“

There are minifigures with ghost-possessed heads and regular heads that can be hunted for and helped by switching the heads about making for a complete play experience without using the app. LEGO did a great job developing a solid idea around this theme and its sets.

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By in United States,

I think these sets are wonderful even without the app. The swapped heads and transformations of the various buildings/vehicles/pieces of scenery are at least as much fun as the old Monster Hunters theme, and adding in an app to make a game out of it sounds like a great stimulus to imagination, which can go on developing long after the app is out of date. It's win-win for TLG in my opinion--and there's nothing stopping old fogeys like me, who don't even want to own a "smart phone," from making up a non-electronic version for ourselves.

As for not having "ghost figures," the fact that ghosts are usually invisible is surely part of their creepiness! Kids certainly aren't going to have a problem with it--that's what imagination is all about. If you simply *must* have physical objects to represent the supernatural, there are plenty of figures available at Bricklink to fill the bill....

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By in United Kingdom,

Even without the app stuff they look like fun sets with interesting parts and new pieces.

Watched this video from New York toy fair which gives a decent idea of how the integration works -

https://youtu.be/B_2iZmtteaE

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By in United States,

Cool interview. Aanchir has the best comments on this site!

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By in Poland,

Ok there is only ONE thing I don't like about this theme.
Lack of REBUILDING.
Once again Lego Proves they are JUST a toy while being way more :/

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By in United States,

@Chouju_X[SPAM] agreed, he always puts so much time and effort into them!

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By in United States,

@GrizBe, I wasn’t trying to get a reaction. But like many people, you seemed to base your opinion on a very small sample of people, i.e. kids I know. Lego has data and statistics saying this is an idea worth exploring. None of us have that data.

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By in United States,

Just another thought about the ghosts... the dog is a ghost that can only be *seen* because he wears a sheet over himself. Why would ghosts trying to possess people wear sheets so as to be seen? LEGO made the right decision leaving the ghost minifigures out. I really dig the look of the possessed figures too.

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By in United States,

@JusJeff Sorry! I know I'm bad at keeping things concise and it's not something I'm proud of. A lot of my background in online communities was on forums so I'm probably more used to that type of social setting.

@lordofdragonss: I mean, you can rebuild the set, it just won't work with the app game. And there isn't ANY set you can rebuild that will be guaranteed to have all the same play features or play scenarios as the original model had, so I don't feel like this is all that different.

I imagine that if this theme is successful, then in the future LEGO might find ways in the future to apply similar technology in an app that's more compatible with kids' own original builds, but I don't feel as though this app lacking features as complicated as that is a sign that LEGO isn't interested in kids using the pieces to build their own stuff.

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By in United States,

I'm still looking forward to the theme for the sets themselves, as I see potential for great city compatible builds w/o the "monster" transformations. The High School, Diner, Boat, Bus (w/mods), and Graveyard seem well suited to this. I had thought I'd download the app and have fun enjoying the sets and the app w/my 9 y/o daughter as well. So I checked the specs and my iPhone 6 uses an A8 processor, and ARKit requires at least an A9 or A10, available on the iPhone 6s and later releases. Bummer dudes. My wife does have an iPhone 10, which I guess we'll need to borrow. Oh and the iPhone 6 wasn't released until Sept. 19th, 2014, so not quite 5 years. Mine is about 2 years old.

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By in Singapore,

I'm firmly in the "ghosts that only appear in AR is the entire premise of Hidden Side and cannot possibly be a disadvantage" camp. I don't have any personal interest in AR play experiences but if I did I would certainly enjoy this theme.

@Aanchir, The Teenage Brickster: As an iPhone SE owner I can attest that it does in fact support ARKit-enabled apps, including LEGO's own existing apps.

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By in United Kingdom,

Hidden Side 2020????? wow!!!

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By in {Unknown country},

I think it's really cool what Lego is trying to do here. Good looking sets with an interactive app that does a bit more than just animate things but actually makes a fun game of it.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcMuvoLEwJ0

What I don't understand is that they made the choice to make this only work with "recent" smartphones. Here's a list of all supported devices for ARcore.
https://developers.google.com/ar/discover/supported-devices

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By in United States,

@ChrisBricks81: I imagine that's a tough sort of decision to make with a tech-driven product like this . Expand the number of compatible devices too far and you might have to compromise the "wow factor" that comes with using some of the latest and greatest AR tech. Similarly, they could wait for compatible devices to be more widespread, but that'd just be inviting another toy company to introduce the same sort of concept ahead of Lego.

In my case, I have a several-year-old incompatible iPhone 6, but this theme has me seriously considering upgrading. So I imagine that might also be an option that's being factored in for adults or families who are seriously passionate about Lego.

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By in United States,

@aanchir, I'm not saying I disagree with anything your posting, but your replies seem longer than the original article. I recommend reaching out to Huw and see if he has any openings for a new reviewer on the site. It may turn into a review set once or twice a year.

Now looking forward to Steamboat Willie while I wait for Hidden sets...

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