Brickpicker Raffle Fundraiser

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Brickpicker is a popular LEGO investment website and a valued part of the online community which offers a service quite different to that of many other sites, thanks in part to the tireless efforts of Jeff and Ed.

A raffle is currently being held over there to raise funds for Ed's son's school which is struggling to find the money required to remain open.

Raffle tickets are being sold starting at $10 which will enter you into a draw to win retired and large LEGO sets. Separate raffles are being held for each prize.

Prizes include:

  • $1000 Amazon gift card
  • 75192 Millennium Falcon
  • 10196 Grand Carousel
  • 76042 The SHIELD Helicarrier
  • 10228 Haunted House and other Monster Fighters sets
  • 10253 Big Ben and 10214 Tower Bridge

You can read full details and purchase tickets here. The contest is open to participants worldwide.

Good luck if you choose to enter. This is certainly a worthy cause.

28 comments on this article

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By in United States,

Alright then, let's get this over with: the fund raising here is for a Catholic school and the "controversy" is that this Catholic school charges more for tuition to parents of kids who are not Catholic.

As with all things, if you don't want to support it, then don't. You can spend your money however you like. Personally, I think those are some pretty great prizes and I see no controversy at all. Sad to see this turn political so quickly, but guess that's the world we live in now.

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By in Canada,

They are good prizes, but I'm a supporter of public education and thus I choose not to participate. However, I have no problem with anyone who chooses to do so.

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By in United States,

“This is certainly a worthy cause”
Well, if you say so, Huw...

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By in United States,

It would be interesting to know what the chances of winning are.

I see absolutely no problem with featuring this article here.

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By in United States,

I don't see that this article is a "promotion" for the raffle--simply a heads-up that the raffle exists, for the benefit of any Bricksetter who doesn't also make use of Brickpicker (such as myself). While I don't choose to participate in the raffle, I can't understand why someone would object to being *told* about it.

@Your future president--the chances of winning depend on how many tickets are purchased, which obviously can't be known until the time limit on purchase has been reached. (It will be interesting to see if all the prizes attract equal attention, or which is way ahead or behind the others!)

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By in Germany,

The only thing I don't understand is a technical one.

Is this one raffle or several?

I mean, ticket prices vary depending on the prizes. So if I click on "Buy Tickets" for the Amazon gift cards it costs me 20 USD for 10 tickets, but with other prizes it would cost 15 USD or 10 USD for the same amount of tickets.

So if I buy tickets for the gift cards, does this mean I have no chance of winning any of the other prizes? Or do all tickets count towards the same overall pool/selection of prizes?

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By in United States,

It's several separate raffles, all of which support the same charity through the same channel. In the past, the odds of winning the "most desirable" prizes end up being least because more tickets are bought for those. Personally I see it as the only way these awesome guys make it possible to "give back" for the service they provide and am therefore happy to do so, politics be damned.

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By in United Kingdom,

I'm seriously surprised to see this promoted again given how Brick Picker is reguarded pretty much as a tool and website for lego scalpers and those trying to rip people off as the entire focus of the site is buying whatever set they predict will raise in cost the fastest so they can then sell it on to make the biggest profit.

The raffles is a con job where you can only win the prize you bought a ticket specifically for, so its not a true raffle at all.

And as mentioned, Its to help a private Catholic school that has been threatened with closure multiple times over the past 10 years as its own diocese thinks its a waste of money, and former students etc won't fund it either.

@Grynn: Its not a charity this is supporting, but a Private School, with rich alums who don't want to fund their own school. Think about that that ex-pupils don't want to help it. Says a lot in itself.

@AustinPowers: You can only win the prize you specifically buy tickets for. So if you buy for the gift card, those tickets won't give you any chance of winning the Falcon.

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By in Germany,

@GrizBe: thanks, that clears things up. I see the article has now also been updated to reflect this.

Considering all this, plus having done a bit of research about both said school and the Brickpicker website I have decided not to take part in this raffle after all.
Good luck to all who do though.

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By in United Kingdom,

FAQ

Q: What are the odds of winning?

A: That would be an ecumenical matter.

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By in Canada,

I'm with Tyrell Archer on this one.

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By in United States,

I use Brickpicker as an AFOL who just wants to find the best deals on sets. These community there has a certain character about them, but overall they're a good bunch of people. It's all about using your resources made available to you in the way best fit for you.

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By in United States,

Brick Picker is here to make it so that one piece from 2004 you really need five of for your MOC costs $27 per unit due to scalpers who have no interest in actually building MOCs. A word of warning: scalpers ruined Magic: the Gathering and they can do the same to Lego.

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By in United States,

@CopperTablet then just make a different piece work. What's the point of building if you can't make a MOC work without five of that one piece from 2004?

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By in United States,

When I see the words "Lego" and "investing" together it makes me cringe.

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By in United States,

Here's a copy of part of my comment from last time and my insight into what the indirect effects of Lego investing/scalping are, regardless of your opinion on Brickpicker itself : "In my opinion sites like Brickpicker, by promoting what seems like harmless investing, along with other factors (such as Lego's severely limited Comic-con giveaways) is unknowingly and indirectly responsible for atrocities like theft of Lego sets and the success of Lepin by inflating aftermarket prices."

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By in United States,

^I read your comment before. I would be—interested—to know your reasoning to *how* you believe partnerships like this befoul the lego economy. I’m not saying you’re wrong, I’m just intrigued.

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By in United States,

I like the modulars, but I'm also a large advocate of public schools seeing as I am currently in one myself. I really don't think private schools give anyone a step forward intellectually, just they look better. I'm already a published author in a football town- didn't need a private school to help with that. On the contrary, the English and History department throws their full support at my writing ventures with whatever I may need.

I'd like to see one of these for public schools.

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By in United Kingdom,

@Your future president: I remember around the same time last year the Fairy Bricks van was broken into and robbed. At the time it was filled with limited edition sets that were going to be given away to charity. The side door of the van was literally ripped off and all that was taken was the lego sets.

Without sites like Brick Picker pushing up prices on sets and being a resource for scalpers, those limited edition sets would not have had a monitary value worth breaking into a van to steal and they'd have been dumped out of the van and the van taken as it would have been worth more to a chop shop or similar. The facts the van was targeted and only the sets taken shows the criminals who did it knew they can resell the sets at a huge mark up. As said, without these people claiming they're doing it for 'investment' and artificially inflating the demand and prices, such a theft would probably never have occurred.

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By in United States,

You guys mention Brickpicker like its actually selling sets and controlling the market. Yet no-one here has a problem with Bricklink...a collective group of people who sell old, used/new/hard to find/discontinued, sets and random parts at an over market price rate? How you can shame an informational forum for just talking about it and then pass over sites that sell them? Sure there might be some overlap between the two, but the same can be said for selling on AMZ or EBAY. Give me an example of how Brickpicker has specifically influenced people to go to Lepin. Have you SEEN the subreddit for that "brand" and the toxicity of their "followers" to the core Lego brand? Lego has established itself as a high-market/luxury brand and Lego isn't the only brand that has done so. They set their prices higher than their competitors so they can be the premium choice. That will always bring its fair share of people who are willing to take their own money and spend it on bulk purchases as a gamble to resell in the future. Its not just Lego.

However, the simple fact here is if you don't want to donate, just don't.

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By in United States,

^ Well said

@GrizBe
That’s fair, but...
Can the same be said for diamond sellers? That they are responsible for diamond thefts because they list their goods at high prices? The same goes for Lego sets: retail or secondhand. They are not valuable because the sellers give them value, but they are because we—the consumers—assign them value. I can sell a shoelace for $12,000, but that does not mean that anybody will buy it, and it certainly does not mean it has that much value. No one is going to steal my shoelace that I’m selling for $12,000 and try to sell it themselves. Why? Because no one would buy it. The fault for crime, then, lies just as much with us, the consumers, as it does with the buyers of diamonds. It definitely does not fall upon the shoulders of sellers.

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By in United Kingdom,

@Cosmic Speed: The entire point of Brick Picker though is that it speculates on what lego sets are going to rise in value the most and then advises people to go out and bulk buy them, specifically for the purpose to resell them later at a profit.

Bricklink etc are just reselling sites where people are free to buy and sell at whatever price they want and frequently, everyone goes for the cheapest option on there.

Brick Picker can be said to be blaimed for Lepin as they advised things such as buying the UCS sets so they could be scalped later, which in part would have lead to prompting Lepin to make their own knock off versions, as they knew people couldn't afford the prices the proper sets were being touted for by the scalpers.

@Your Future President: Diamonds were actually reguarded as a cheap gemstone until the de Beirs diamond company start a whole marketing campaign to jack up the prices for them with their 'Engagement rings should be diamonds and cost 3 months wages' ploy. So yes, diamond sellers can be blaimed for diamond thefts by artificially inflating the prices.

As for the shoelace, tell someone it was owned by a celebrity and make up some convoluted story as to why its valuable and someone somewhere will shell out for your asking price if you get lucky convincing them its not worthless.

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By in United States,

@GrizBe: Just because you only win for one specific thing that you bought a ticket to doesn't mean it's not a raffle or that it's a "con job". I can see how it could be mistaken as one big raffle for everything, but it's obvious that it's just several raffles which you seem to have picked up on. How you came to your conclusion is just weird.

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By in United Kingdom,

If the minimum number of tickets you can buy is 10, then relative to everyone else that is really equivalent to 1 chance.

Anyway, good luck to everyone who enters.

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By in United Kingdom,

@dtobin123: Clearly you haven't bothered looking into how this raffle works at all as windjammers gotten one of the tricks as to why its a con straight away.

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By in Netherlands,

So basically Brickset promotes gambling now...

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By in United States,

@GrizBe What effect does someone buying a set at retail have on someone else buying counterfeit goods? Visit the bootleg reddit page, most of the sets people are buying are sets still in production. This isn't because they don't have an outlet to buy them... it's because they are just cheap... or feel entitled to have something that they can't afford.

Sets generally last 1-2 years at retail. If someone fails to buy it during that period, they either do the mature thing and decide they missed and go without... or face aftermarket prices. This issue doesn't just exist with Lego, but with every product. Costs go up when they are no longer being produced by the manufacturer.

When sets are selling in bulk, Lego tends to extend the life of the product as the demand is still high enough to validate production costs. Resellers are not buying sets until they are set to retire... they do nothing to prevent the average person from grabbing one off the shelf during the production run.

Also, have you looked at eBay sold listings for products? It's not the big flashy sets that are actually worth buying in bulk... as after fees and shipping, you don't really make all that much. They are not worth the storage space or financial investment. 10240 is worth a hair over the retail price nearly 4 years after retiring... 75095 can still be purchased below retail... and the list goes on. The really really old UCS sets or modulars may be worth a decent amount now, but those are from well before Lego investing really took off... and if you compare the amount of money you spent on those sets, to the length of time you are holding it... you're almost always better off putting that money in a retirement account.

It's the small gems like 41171 could be purchased at $5 or less on sale, and now sells for $50+. That was out of no ones price range, but the aftermarket was strong for it. It's all a guessing game... and if "everyone" is publicly saying a set is a good investment, you'd be best to stay away. If "everyone" is buying a particular set, then the prices will stagnate.

When a set is "Limited Edition", even people who don't care about a product will buy some just due to the fact that they are limited. Blame Lego for this, as 1/5000 Brickheadz, and Darth Vader Bust sets just invited anyone and everyone. A niche site like Brickpicker does not have much reach... but these deals hit Reddit and SlickDeals... which have a huge reach. People there were posting how they bought double digit amounts of sets for resale. "Limited Edition" and "numbered" sets invite anyone who thinks they can make money. If Lego wants to be a limited edition collectors item, then it needs to go that path. Otherwise, make sets in numbers that allow everyone a fair shake, and if someone wants to speculate that one day in the future that a broadly available set will go up in value, that's their money to gamble.

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