Technic bargains at IWOOT

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Liebherr R 9800

Liebherr R 9800

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IWOOT continues to be a great place to pick up Technic bargains, particularly if you're in North America or elsewhere outside Europe, where Technic tends to be more expensive compared to the UK.

42100 Liebherr R 9800 is currently available for just US$379.99 (RRP $449.99) and 42110 Land Rover Defender for $179.99, a saving of $20. Worldwide shipping is free, or about $10 for expedited.

Check out IWOOT's entire range of Technic and, while you're there, pick up a few Brickset-branded goodies, too!

13 comments on this article

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By in Netherlands,

€344 for the Liebherr is a good price, but unfortunately the price does not work for the Netherlands :(

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By in United Kingdom,

UK prices appear to be RRP, apart from the Chiron

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By in United Kingdom,

Yes but you forget that UK RRP is a lot cheaper that RRP in other countries so, with free or cheap shipping, IWOOT offers a viable alternative to buying locally for many.

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By in United Kingdom,

As someone who's never been into technic I find myself intrigued by the whole range, how much of it Lego sells , average age of the purchasers, a general overview of the technic catalogue over the years etc.

I think the appeal is the gearing systems they implement into vehicles but aren't there sets where there is no gearing or inner workings?
What's the appeal in these sets?

I'd be really interested in hearing anyone out with a passion for technic as to what drives their love for the range.
I will say the lack of gaps in that new 4x4 impressed me recently but generally the gaps and lack of minifig scaling are my issues.

If someone out there with inclination to express their love for technical exists I'd be quite grateful

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By in United Kingdom,

@banzaipinball Thx
Any ideas or feelings on what fuels the love of technic? Please don't take this as me throwing shade, it's a genuine curiosity

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By in Netherlands,

@Mica86 Great question! Three reasons for me:

1. Complex gearboxes can be interesting but they are by no means necessary. One of my favourite technic sets of the last years was the 42053 Volvo EW160E excavator. Its functions were achieved by using a mixture of pneumatics, linkages and a few (4) gears. It worked very well and was a joy to build.
2. By and large, Technic sets give you a great building experience bang for the buck. I recently bought the Hogwarts Express. I enjoyed the set, but it's a short build compared to an equivalently priced Technic set.
3. I enjoy Technic MOCcing and you Never Have Enough Parts (TM).

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By in Germany,

@Mica86: I love very different LEGO themes, Technic being one of them, even though it is so different to most of my other favorite themes.

What I love about Technic (at least the older sets up to about the Arocs or the Xerion, the last two Technic sets I liked) is how you can learn about the inner workings while you build stuff, and seeing it work when it is finished. That's also the main reason why I don't like the latest Technic sets anymore. Those are all about the looks and less about the functions. The new Defender being a prime example. Also, the mechanisms inside nowadays are so complex that you don't really understand what you are building anymore. You just follow the instructions for hundreds of pages and in the end what you have built gets hidden behind panels. What do you need all the effort for?

That's why nowadays my focus of favorite Themes has shifted towards Creator Expert, Ideas as well as Architecture.

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By in United States,

@Mica86, I mainly use Technic as a vehicle for GBC nowadays, but there's certain sets that I just love. One of my top 10 sets of any theme is 42048, it's just an excellent piece of machinery. You get a functioning gear shifter, working steering, and a visible engine, all with great colors. Overall, I prefer Technic sets nowadays because it gives functions that other themes just can't come close to. Outside of flick-fire missiles and maybe an 'exploding' wall, System sets have so little playability (if you're not interested in moving the minifigs around). Don't get me wrong, I love minifigs, but when a build is able to Do Things, I absolutely love it.

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By in United States,

I wish I was more into Technic. I own only one set from the theme.

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By in Canada,

As AustinPowers mentioned, for Technic lovers, it's all about functions over forms.

Back in the days, (in the beginning i.e. 1979) every system was clearly visible. Car chassis 853(953) and the first supercar (8860) made it very easy to understand steering (8860 has ackerman due to the geometry of the steering rods).

It was also easy to understand the general functioning of pistons and to some degrees to a primitive manual transmission. For a time, differential were visible and the concept could be explored in action.

Suspension on Lego Technic sets is still far from the reality (load spring to take the shock and shock absorber to prevent a coil-back) and probably will never come close but the general idea is sufficiently well demonstrated with the need of cardans for independent suspension.

What we have not seen yet in Technic form is front wheel drive kit with homokinetic joints (although 8880 was close) and MacPherson suspension. Inclination(backward and inside) of the axle of steering does not exist in official Technic models but good moccers were able to do it. That was it for cars. The other most frequent Technic sets are cranes.

Here you can pack many functions in a compact set (8460, 8431,8438 is probably the best example). You have HOG steering, outriggers, rotating the crane, raising the boom, telescoping the boom and operating the load line. Forklifts are also produced consistently, raising/lowering the fork, tilting the fork and steep steering for ease of maneuverability.

Tractors are another group where you get steering, often-time pendulum suspension of front wheels, raising/lowering the attachments and driving the attachement from the tractor "power" via cardan.

In summary, the best part of Technic is to explore "how things works". the look of the model is secondary. Nowadays, this has disappeared, The Bugatti Chiron has very complex mechanics inside but when the model is finished, you have no way of seeing "in action" what is going on inside (that is why I still prefer 8448 for that).

Whenever you see a Technic review, they will talk about (1) new parts, because new parts means new mechanisms to explore or how to do an old mechanism in a more compact way, (2) then they will go into the "functions": which ones are hand operated (no interest from a technical point of view) and those who are geared/pneumatic which are sought after - sometimes there will be a discussion as to how closely the mechanism reflects a real life model (42066 has neat functions -and something to learn - but none of them are comparable to a real life model - not even close!) and finally (4) the general look of the model for display purposes. I've already been going for way too long, I hope this helps.

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By in United Kingdom,

Thx all for taking the time to share some of your thoughts on the technic range. Appreciated, always interesting to hear another perspective.

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By in Germany,

@HOBBES has absolutely nailed it. Perfect description. The theme is all about the technical aspects of things. Weren't the first sets in the very beginning even called "Technical" instead "Technic"?

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