Introducing LEGO Originals

Posted by ,
Wooden Minifigure

Wooden Minifigure

©2019 LEGO Group

Here's a press release about a new range of wooden toys:

Igniting nostalgia and celebrating brand heritage - new LEGO Originals series launches with a 5:1 upscaled wooden minifigure

Making its entrance for the first time in 1978, the LEGO minifigure has become one of the biggest pop-cultural icons of modern times and continues to renew itself – this time paying homage to its heritage in a decorative wooden 5:1 upscaled version

London, November 1st: Launching with the LEGO Originals Wooden Minifigure 853967, the LEGO Group and design specialists Room Copenhagen are introducing a new range of products dedicated to fans who love a bit of LEGO nostalgia and playful interior design.

The product was revealed today at a unique LEGO Originals Pop Up Store and Gallery in Covent Garden, London where fans can drop by for a chance to pick up this rare and limited-edition model before it goes on sale more widely to LEGO VIP-members on LEGO.com from November 3rd to 7th, then globally from November 8th.


Founded in 1932 by master carpenter Ole Kirk Kristiansen, the first LEGO toys were hand crafted from wood. His craftsmanship and attention to detail secured a high level of quality for the products, but when wood supplies became scarce in the aftermath of the second World War, Ole started supplementing his production with plastic toys and the rest is history…

Speaking in 1950, Ole Kirk Kristiansen said: “I have always been committed to making the nicest and most robust objects, and just like other carpenters I believe the best type of advertising is when the product promotes itself. Our purpose is to produce a really good, solid and finely crafted piece of work, and ensure LEGO products always be known for their exceptional quality".

Respecting our heritage as a producer of high-quality handmade wooden toys, this premium model is handcrafted from FSC-certified oak, with adjustable yellow plastic hands just like today’s LEGO minifigures. The model measures over 7” (20cm) tall, 4” (11cm) wide and 3,5” (9cm) deep. The last LEGO product to combine both wood and plastic was the 1130 Bedford firetruck 60 years ago in 1959.

This 5:1 upscaled version of the classic LEGO minifigure is presented in a premium gift box with a 28-page booklet featuring the history of the minifigure and the story behind the development of this wooden model. Also included are inspiring examples of how LEGO designers personalised their models, as well as inspiration for accessories fans can build using the included LEGO bricks. A number of LEGO designers have already given their take on how to personalise the model, and the results will be exhibited for a limited time at the LEGO Originals Pop Up Store and Gallery in London.

Since its arrival in 1978, there have been over 8,000 different minifigures launched, not to mention the many versions children have created themselves. This new edition is no exception. Owners are encouraged to unleash their creativity to decorate and customize the minifigure in unique ways, display with pride at home or the office and share their creations via social media using #LEGOOriginals.

"It has been a privilege for us to expand our collaboration with The LEGO Group and contribute to the world premiere of a new series of design classics," explains Jacob Eberhard, CEO of Room Copenhagen. "Going back to the roots of the company and helping to bring back some of the original LEGO toys in new creative ways is an exciting journey to be part of."


Product information

853967 Wooden Minifigure
US $119.99 – CA $154.99 -- UK £109.99 -- DE 119.99€
Iconic Wooden Minifigure model for creative customization!

Celebrate a true icon of play with this beautiful, posable LEGO Originals Wooden Minifigure (853967). A 5:1 upscaled version of the classic minifigure, it is carved out of oak and has adjustable plastic hands. It is presented in a premium gift box with a leaflet featuring inspirational ideas for owners to customize the model in their own ways, plus instructions to build 5 cute items using the included LEGO bricks.

  • A beautiful, 5:1 upscaled, posable wooden version of the classic LEGO minifigure introduced to LEGO sets in 1978, for display as it is or for ‘make-it-your-own’ customization.
  • Reflecting LEGO origins as a producer of handmade wooden toys, this premium-quality model is handcrafted from FSC-certified oak, with adjustable plastic hands just like today’s LEGO minifigures.
  • This set also includes a 28-page leaflet featuring the history of the minifigure and the development of this wooden model, plus inspiring examples of how LEGO creatives personalised their models.
  • The leaflet also has instructions on how to build 5 fun little models for the minifigure to hold using the included 29 LEGO elements.
  • Presented in a premium gift box, this set makes a fantastic birthday, Christmas or nostalgic present for LEGO fans and any creative person.
  • Owners can unleash their creativity to dress up, paint or do whatever they want to customize the minifigure in unique ways and then show off their creations via social media using #LEGOOriginals.
  • Measures over 7” (20cm) tall, 4” (11cm) wide and 3” (8cm) deep.


More information

LEGO has also provided us with the following answers to common questions:

Does it have any moveable parts?

The only moveable parts on the LEGO Wooden Minifigure are the hands. This was a conscious decision made by the product designer after exploring many iterations of the concept.

The high tolerances we are able to achieve when making the LEGO System minifigure are not possible when working with wood, so to avoid a deterioration in the articulation of the wooden minifigure over time and to ensure the product adheres to our strict toy safety guidelines, the limbs and head were kept static.

It was also important to the LEGO Group that the plastic hands work with the LEGO System in Play and therefore allows consumers to have fun building the new accessories shown in the leaflet.

Why are there no holes under its feet?

This has been designed as a decorative model for which reason we have had to leave the holes out to ensure a steady foundation.

Why are its hands plastic?

Product quality and safety is our highest concern at the LEGO Group, and just as with any other LEGO product, it is absolutely crucial that the LEGO Originals Wooden Minifigure meets the strict toy safety requirements we operate with.

Due to the thin and therefore weaker spots on the minifigure hands, only the plastic material used for classic minifigure hands ensures also kids can safely play with this model.

Wooden hands would simply too easily break and splinter from being dropped, which we do not allow as part of our safety assessment. We also see the merge of wood and plastic as a celebration of our heritage, in fact it has been 60 years since we last launched a product featuring both of these materials – this was the 1130 Fire truck.


You can view more images on the set details page and look out for our review later today.

Will you be buying this model?

Yes! A day one purchase!
Yes, eventually
No, it doesn't interest me
No, it's too expensive

86 comments on this article

Gravatar
By in Ireland,

"This has been designed as a decorative model..."
"... kids can safely play with this model."
Not doing it for me. It tries to be two things and fails at both. For display it should be all wood, for play it should be articulated.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

It is certainly very interesting, and maybe a bit too expensive. But if I can get it cheap somewhere sometime, sure I'll get it.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

bit too expensive but very good. a new range of products?????????

Gravatar
By in Germany,

Seriously? This is what TLG thinks people need? No light system, no new trains? But a wooden minifig?

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

So its a 20cm tall block of decorative wood that they've tried to incorporate 'play' elements into?

Seriously, what are some of those lego designers smoking? Kids aren't going to want a rather boring looking display piece and Adults with any sense aren't going to waste £110 for a block of wood, Especially when I note you can go on sites like Etsy and buy fully articulated, fully wooden lego minifigures for less then £40 that are just as big.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I like it - it’s lighthearted and fun. I especially like the way the hands contrast with the oak. I don’t like the marketing BS that comes with it though, or the price.

Gravatar
By in Canada,

That's an interesting choice. I wonder if they'll do the duck? I would buy a replica of the duck.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I managed to get a place to buy this in Covent Garden, London today, but after seeing what the product is, I'm not even gonna bother going.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

A complete miss for me:

The price, for a 7" figure.
It's not wood, it is wood and plastic.
The hands look crap, it wouldn't be so bad if they did hands and a head in plastic. But doing just the hands looks terrible. The hand colour doesn't match the head.
Is it for play, or display. If play, make it in plastic. If display, make it all in wood.

You can get a similar sized alarm clock for significantly less than this.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

An *epic fail* here. This should just be all-wood for use as a nice - albeit ridiculously expensive - display item. If worries TLG that much they should just make the plastic hands the same wood-colour - but who on Earth is going to use it as a toy?? How many kids have all-wood toys nowadays?? Mine don't - their stuff was / is plastic or material plastic!

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Nice display piece but it's not part of the LEGO system and cannot be used as such (Plasctic hands and some Duplo bricks don't count) so unless it can be found at some point for a quarter of the price, it's a big no from me.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I have a similar model that's all wood and painted to look like Deadpool, for about £20 from the local Xmas market one year. I think it's a nice display piece. This, not so much. I'm not quite sure what the point of it is (as others have said, it's not quite toy, not quite display), other than to be a collectible?

Gravatar
By in Italy,

"The last LEGO product to combine both wood and plastic was the 1130 Bedford firetruck 60 years ago in 1959."

First time I notice that a set is missing from the very comprehensive Brickset database!
There are some 1:87 Bedford vehicles from the 1950s but not this one.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I booked to go to the gallery tomorrow, and received a confirmation for my chosen slot.

Today, I got an email saying they are looking forward to seeing me this afternoon, when I can't make it and as such hadn't chosen a slot for today.

What an absolute mess.

Still, whilst the idea of a wooden Lego set is somewhat appealing, I was expecting something more substantial than an oversized minifig at that price. So maybe it doesn't matter that they've messed up the bookings - this isn't worth the time and money it will take for me to go to the gallery anyway.

Gravatar
By in Germany,

@bandit778
If these were in fact Duplo bricks, the minifigure would be much more appealing at this price point. But these are regular pieces and the minifigure measures only 20 cm in height.

When I first saw the picture, I had the idea that you might be able to place it somewhere on the ground as room decoration. But for that it is much too small!

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

The AFOL Lego community. Never satisfied! lol :)
I for one, like it. I don't £110 like it, but I do like it

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Looks like an amazing product to display and is a great thing for AFOLs and TFOLs to have but omg £110 for this is a massive deterrence for me and probably for many others.

Looks amazing but massively overpriced, I hope this sells poorly and reaches deep discount but I doubt it massively sadly.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

A shame it looks like White Oak and not European Oak which is possibly more suitable, more attractive and suitable for the price but I really love it. You could oil this if there is no waxed finish.

Unless there was more it could hold I also would have preferred a obtuse grain cut to achieve the wood hands on a larger figure for this price, especially if it can't move.
I love wood products and hope many people enjoy this. Undecided!
12+?! It's actually an excellent baby toy... if baby lives in Knightsbridge.

EDIT: What? 7'' high? Sorry I can not justify that.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

"By @deikoon in Germany
If these were in fact Duplo bricks, the minifigure would be much more appealing at this price point. But these are regular pieces and the minifigure measures only 20 cm in height."

Oops, My bad. Must have had my glasses on back to front. :(

To be fair to the hard of seeing, the way it's photographed does gives a false impression of it's actual size (didn't take much notice of the height in the description if I'm honest).

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

If it was plastic I'd consider it - at that size it will scale quite well with most action figure lines. As a wooden figure though - the price becomes far too high, and the plastic hands spoil any chance at a unified aesthetic.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

^ Get yourself an alarm clock minifigure, use filler over the clock part and you have a similar plastic minifigure at about 1/6th the price. Or you can get a newer style Emmet/Wyldstyle clock, and break / cut the figure off the base.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

Arms and legs should definitely be articulated to allow for different poses. Don't see of making this possible in wood. Articulation of the limbs (especially the arms) would also greatly enhance the possibilities of making the figure interact with brick-built accessories.

And *if* static is the only way to go, why choose this "both arms pointing forward"-pose? It looks weird...

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Well, that's got to be the biggest disappointment caused by 7 inches of wood since my wife left ... actually, no lets not go there*.

I do quite like it and think the yellow plastic hands work quite well in contrast to the wood. However, for the price I was expecting something at least twice the size, and even then it is still expensive.

*which is, coincidentally, what she said.

Gravatar
By in Australia,

Lego produces an incredible amount of sets a year, so many that are awesome that people often comment on this site to the state of their poor wallet.

Something different and interesting appears and the response seems to be "I don't want it, or I wouldn't pay that, and therefore it is bad."

Seems the "me, me, me" is almost becoming a meme among the comments recently.

Gravatar
By in New Zealand,

It's pretty awesome but what I really am waiting for is the Yellow Castle re-issue (here's hoping).

Gravatar
By in France,

I really like it. Both idea and final product. So I 'm sorry to be a fall negative now, but I wish it would have been smaller and cheaper too, so that more of us could have had one. Maybe two thirds of it and a few euros less.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

There are three combo bundles with this included to make some interest and potentially more purchases.

Gravatar
By in New Zealand,

Yep, they've lost the plot. Completely. For that price I'd expect it to be human-scaled life-size!

And the hands? Ugly. And did I mention ugly?

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I thought of a really funny rude joke about seven inches of wood, but best not to go there (although someone already has above)... mainly to poke fun at the ridiculous price of this item.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I dunno, I think it looks nice... but it's definitely not for me. I guess the appeal factor is that it's a novelty item, more than anything?

Gravatar
By in Singapore,

I wonder what the manufacturing process is like. This really doesn't look like 200 Singapore dollars to me. Maybe 150, and that's still being very generous. But pricing aside, it looks really cool and the fact that there is room for customization of all kinds of mediums (not just the included LEGO bricks) makes it even better, even if it doesn't interest me personally.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

What with the mess they made of the VIP reboot, the Rebuild the World ad, and then this, I'm seriously starting to wonder about Lego's marketing department. :(

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

I thought, well maybe I'll scoop out a 120 euro for this… now it's 130 euro in the Netherlands. Why?

Gravatar
By in United States,

I thought this was an interesting idea even though I didn't want one myself, but those hands.

Yellow plastic does not go well with wood.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

@Wrecknbuild
LEGO is often higher priced in NL compared to the German € price listed on this site.
Most commonly €5 higher on mid-sized sets, €10 on larger.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

All I'm saying is I'm glad I didn't make the trip to London for that

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I'd rather have solid wooden hands that can't grip anything than jarring yellow plastic ones. If they must go plastic, then at least make the head match the hands..? This is just a mess, and a disappointment.

And as for articulation, any teddy-bear manufacturer from the last 50 years could supply you with a load of discrete nylon bearings for pennies that would never wear out and no-one would know were even there.

And now I feel as though I have to apologise for the 'negativity' on display in these posts, but frankly, if LEGO just continue to exploit and mock their biggest fans with ill-conceived ideas, then you should expect to see a lot more of it.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

For me they should have made articulated by inserting flush magnets so not only would the parts click into place it would rotate easily and if strong would give a little "clutch" power and be strong enough to stand/pose etc. you can easily get Neodymium magnets that would be discrete and do a great job.

Gravatar
By in Germany,

LEGO using glue on a sales item?
If you look at the wood texture on the images you can see that the figures must be assembled from several parts. If hands are the only poseable parts this would implicate that the model is glued from several pieces: head, body, hips, legs. I cannot recognize if texture of the arms continous towards the upper body.

My next question would be:
Is there a finish on the figure. e.g. some sort of transparent paint, or is it plain wood sureface?

I like wooden toys but Brio who manufactures wooden train & tracks set lost me many years ago when they introduced plastic wheel to their toys. But I understand LEGOs decision to use artificial material for the hands for safety reasons.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I looks like it’s just standing there trying to honk some bewbz

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

This is great product for a very specific market. Some will complain about that and suggest that the company's priorities should be elsewhere, but I think it's a nice decoration for young adults and those who simply love the Lego brand.

The use of plastic hands is justified; just because this isn't primarily a play product, doesn't mean that a child couldn't pick it up and damage it/themselves. Much to the same reason that a Nintendo Switch is marketed towards young adults, but uses a plastic screen for the just-in-case scenario.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I still think it's an April Fool's joke.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

@TeriXeri
Thanks. I think it shouldn't differ. One reason may be that the average price level in Germany for Lego is lower, with more stores that offer Lego at a discount. Anyway, there is a good offer with 1500 Classic bricks for 30 euros more.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Why is the first adjective “posable”?

It’s not.

Gravatar
By in Serbia,

I'm sure TLG knows what they are doing, after all the last time they branched out to do stuff beyond their core business it went perfectly well.

Oh wait.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I'd consider it if they included a set of wooden hands that could be swapped in place of the plastic ones, and it was the same scale as the big figures they use for advertising in retail stores.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I think it's fine. It an actual wooden canvas in the style of a LEGO Minifigure for artists to decorate on. I think this is more for the audience of the art community, and I would guess the high price is cause these are limited edition. I doubt we'd see another wooden thing from LEGO for a long time.

I really like the artistic design of it. The combination of The LEGO Group's past and present fused into a wooden minifigure.

I think this is more of a collectible art piece rather than a toy. Something that is meant to be displayed at home. It's definitely not for everyone, myself included, but I appreciate the art and the design of it, and if people truly do customize them, then I think we'll get to see more ideas of minifigure customization that we won't see before.

Gravatar
By in Canada,

I like this a lot but $120 for a 7’ wooden figure? No thanks. I think this line is a great idea and I might buy some of the other products if they’re decent prices.

Gravatar
By in Switzerland,

Nope. "Let us stray even further from our main product, this will surely increase sales and make our fans happy! Some suckers will happily dish out a ton of money for it!" Yeah, right.

Gravatar
By in Norway,

Really like it and will prefer this over the ones available at Etsy, but WHY on earth can’t the head, arms and legs be articulated?! Are they afraid some kid will swallow the limbs?! It’s a DISPLAY piece, so if they could be articulated it would be easier to pose it the way I want it.. But nevertheless, I need it and will buy it :)

Gravatar
By in United States,

If you want a larger minifig for play, the clocks are actually pretty well made and fun for kids.

This isn’t for me, but that’s fine. LEGO can explore and make cool niche products that don’t appeal to the mass market. I like them trying new things.

Gravatar
By in United States,

What Agent00Z said. It’s art, guys. It’s not that novel of a concept. Paint-your-one has been a very popular thing with vinyl toys for a long time, and of course the price goes up exponentially with wood and a LEGO logo. Not sure I’m ready to drop that kind of cash on a craft project, but I’m not going to write it off as a terrible idea. It’s definitely for a niche part of the market and I’m sure they’re aware of that. I applaud the company for continuing to explore new ideas and attempting to bring something fresh to the community. It may not always hit the mark, but cheers for thinking outside the brick!

Gravatar
By in United States,

At first when I saw it I thought it was gonna be around $50. But $120? Seriously? I wouldn't even get it for $20. Not interested in any extra sized, non-plastic, decorative "Lego" piece. Let alone the price.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Me: Hmm, seems cool, something interesting for the LEGO room.

*sees price*

Me: Meh, nevermind.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I can't imagine any scenario where I would pay $120 for a block of wood.

Lego sets are already severely overpriced. I only buy sets on sale or clearance unless they're under $15 but this is a ridiculous price.

Gravatar
By in Norway,

-It should have had a classic smiley face and arms DOWN!

Gravatar
By in United States,

I feel like the entire point of this thing is for you to decorate it like one of those mannequin dolls, but who's gonna drop $120 on something you slap some paint on and call a day. What if you mess up said paint job in the process?

Gravatar
By in United States,


The only way to justify the displaying of that wooden minifigure is if it could be obtained for free and if a franchise of them were possible.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I’m not sure of the market for this. £110 for a plain wooden figure is a lot of money and I just don’t see the appeal. It’s OK for display but not very exciting, and you can’t play with it. I’m not sure how many people would be desperate to buy the figure as a result.

I would be surprised if LEGO shifted a lot of these, we will see!

Gravatar
By in United States,

Plastic hands and a non-articulated figure: absolute deal killer on a pricey wooden collector model. Even wooden artist maquettes have this figured out. *pun intended*

Gravatar
By in United States,

I think this is will be a buy-and-keep for my kids to sell sometime in the distant future.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Too bad this $100 minifigure wasn't aimed for adults, we could have gotten wooden hands.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I absolutely love this piece, with caveats...
Over time even the staunchest of minifigures have looser joints. Which is a good thing! Whether you are a display Lego person, or play Lego person, articulation is a key point to the expression of the build, minifigure or otherwise. I can go on and on about the esoteric meaning of the expressions we put into our builds and minifigures that adorn them but I digress, loosening of joints is to be expected.
What I'm getting at is this, Lego is an amazing company which uphold the highest of standards for a toy company (any company worth their weight should take a few pages from this book). It is hard for me to believe these masterful engineers could not create a wooden minifigure with articulation beyond the hands. I receive extreme enjoyment from posing my daughters Stormtrooper minifigure alarm clock into different poses when she isn't looking.
While I would love to adorn my Lego Den with a wooden maxfigure, I would not be able to look at it without wistfully wishing I could pose him. Sadly a no-go for me.

P.S. That being said, I would never turn down a gift. Cough, cough, nudge, nudge...

Gravatar
By in United States,

The old Lego toys should be added to Brickset and Bricklink's database.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

^ Be happy to, if you can provide information and pictures!

Gravatar
By in Germany,

I am torn on this.
While I like the idea of an official wooden minifigure, I don't like several aspects of the execution.

As this is mainly a display item, the hands should have been made of wood as well. Unless there is extremely hard play involved, those hands should survive even if they are made from wood.
Also, zero articulation is a pity. At least the arms and the head should have been poseable. Speaking of which, why hasn't the head got the classic smiley face etched in? They did it with the LEGO logo on top of the head, why not the face as well?

Lastly, the price, especially considering the small size, the plastic hands and the missing articulation, is just too dear for my liking.

So all in all, the idea is great, the execution leaves a lot to be desired.

Gravatar
By in United States,

One thing that comes to my mind as I read this LEGO press release, the description of the product, and whatnot is the refrain that I hear from defendant fans whenever other groups of AFOLs plead for the return or re-issue of classic sets from yesteryear: "LEGO already learned it can't be successful on nostalgia. It's not economical from a production standpoint, sales of the LEGENDS line were poor, and LEGO focuses on what kids nowadays are into because that is the market they need to capture, not the dwindling amount of aging AFOLs with rose-tinted memories of Classic Space and Fabuland."
I thought about that statement (or argument) because while this "LEGO Originals" wooden minifigure is certainly no re-release or even a proper, conventional LEGO set, the company sure seems encouraged to appeal to our "nostalgia". Which is a very, very odd play, particularly for this product. In the year 2019, how many EFOLs (Elderly Fans of LEGO) still have fond memories of the wooden toy LEGO days? That set they keep name-dropping came out in 1959, and that was a fusion of plastic and wood. A solid wooden toy hadn't been made since the 1940s? Talk about a niche market! Perhaps grandpa will dole out a bit more from his retirement fund this month for one these things, but then again, he might be complaining because this model looks like one of those darn new-fangled mini-figures that came out in 1978 and RUINED everything!
Obviously, that previous scenario is a joke, but that was enabled by this press release. It seems like this is more for adult artists who are looking for a bold new canvas to express themselves. Star Wars did this a while back with the Darth Vader helmet. It wasn't for sale, but they sent a bunch to artists all over the world, let them work their magic, and then it was put in a traveling exhibit. Anyway, this wooden minifigure is a weird thing for LEGO to put out. Not sure what they were thinking, and that is not to imply they weren't, or making decisions while high off their egos or anything presumptuous and rude like that. As an AFOL in my 30s and with some hobbies in art, this thing is an interesting product, but it has no connection via "nostalgia" to me. Now, if this was a propane tank shaped like a series of stacked 2x2 round bricks and plates with the "Octan" logo painted on the side, maybe then I'd fall for the 90s nostalgia and buy a few for the house, but as it is, this LEGO Original just isn't interesting enough to take the bold dive of purchasing. Hopefully, this Originals line continues. I'd be interested to see what else it brings forth, weird as it may be.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

I'm a fan of Lego building and would much rather spend the £110 on actual Lego that I can build again and again as opposed to a wooden ornament.

Gravatar
By in United States,

>> We also see the merge of wood and plastic as a celebration of our heritage

As a designer myself, I know trying to throw "product BS" at your consumers/clients when I read it...

Gravatar
By in United States,

TLG is really taking the “Bricks from Plants” idea a bit too literally!

Gravatar
By in Switzerland,

With this price they at least could put lightsaber in his hands

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

Great idea to pay tribute. Think it’s more of a brand - marketing exercise, then actual selling strategy. Good way for them to talk about the history, etc, etc...

I’d love to get one in minifigure size at 1/5th the price.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I mean it's cool, but too expensive.

@ronvining I'd want one too! $25 wouldn't seem so bad for a minifig-scale wood minifig.

Gravatar
By in United States,

This didn't interest me to begin with, I buy Lego sets primarily because I can build and work on them. Then I got to the price and nearly spit out my water, I'm not even drinking any. That's flipping absurd for a 7" wooden figure. The plastic hands make it look awful.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Has anyone actually been to Covent Garden to get one? Is there anything worth while going for if this will actually be online anyway? Any gifts etc? Just wondering if it’s worth all the travel to get to my slot.

Gravatar
By in Hungary,

And here I thought they couldn't come up with anything else expensive and alienating!

Gravatar
By in United States,

they could have made the joints so that there's plastic rings around wooden pegs, or even use plastic pegs inserting into plastic rings, and then it would be able to articulate just fine. as for painting it, too expensive to ruin with paint. I paint my regular figures anyway. :) while a larger canvas does allow higher levels of detail, I don't find this appealing. it's an interesting idea, but maybe it shouldn't have been hand-made. that's gotta be where that price is coming from. and I really wish Lego wouldn't always try to make their stuff both a collector's item AND a toy. this is clearly not a toy.

Gravatar
By in Germany,

120€ `for 20 cm oak wood ??

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

I like the wooden figure, but I think it's really a shame there is no articulation or pose ability in the arms. They could have put magnets inside the shoulders and torso, and provided the arms with hexagonal (six-sided) pins similar to a hex key, that way you would at least be able to pose the arms.
I also wish the hands were made out of the same material: wood. The yellow plastic hands look so odd on this figure.
--
With regard to the poll; if you had included the answer: maybe, I would have opted to partake in it.

Gravatar
By in Australia,

Too expensive for what you get. If it was somewhat cheaper ($80 AUD is fine) I might get it, but in this case no.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

When I saw the picture I was expecting it to be much bigger than 20cm!
£110 for that size seems way overpriced.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Just checked the calendar... It's not April 1st...?!

Gravatar
By in United States,

When I was in high school, I worked for a guy who made small wooden boats, some of which have appeared in Hollywood movies (I know three of them were used for PotC 2 & 3, and he said Meryl Streep died in one of his boats). The materials he used were often extremely expensive, like marine-grade plywood (1/4" thick, five plys of equal thickness, all mahogany, with _NO_ voids, and waterproof bonders), and board lumber of mahogany, cherry, and walnut. Oak was the no-frills budget option. Now, when you join a transom to the hull, or you bring the two sides of the hull together at the stem, you need to add a block of wood to anchor the joint so there's no flex, or the stress will eventually tear the joints apart. And when you're paying high four figures to low five figures for a handcrafted wooden boat, even these parts have to appear decorative. So he'd put a little double curve on the outside edge to make it look less utilitarian. The problem was that the grain ran diagonally, and the exposed edge did not. If you struck one of these elbows hard enough, the outer curve would just sheer off at the grain line.

That's why this minifig has plastic hands and no other articulated joints. It's _NOT_ as simple as just putting nylon bushings in. The actual hand is way too think to handle the stress. The only way you'd be able to make it in wood is if you precisely centered the hand around the heartwood of a tree so the grain follows the exact shape of the fingers. The hips are even worse. While it might be possible to articulate the arms without risk of breakage, the hips make a crisp T-shape. Short of making them in 2-3 distinct sections, there's no way to make the legs articulated without risk of the piece between the legs snapping off of the belt portion.

The hands are a clear Catch-22. Since they're made out of plastic, they won't hold paint the same way the wood portions will. If someone decides to paint the minifig, yellow is the most likely color they'll want the hands, so in that regard it makes perfect sense that they'd use yellow plastic. For those who want to display the minifig unmodified, yellow looks as bad as it does on the VIP Black Card minifig, and some shade of tan therefore seems like a more appropriate choice. But unless the hands are removable, there's no way to satisfy both viewpoints.

And for those who are complaining about the price, keep in mind that each individual wooden minifig is essentially going to be treated like a prototype. They all have to be machined from solid wood, one at a time. Any defects get tossed out (I had a landlord who worked at Baker Furniture where they'd make wooden office desks that ran five figures, and they'd toss out any pieces of wood that had scratches, dents, voids, or any other blemishes).

Gravatar
By in United States,

This is a product for Richistan, not for those of us prowling the Walmart clearance aisle at midnight.

Return to home page »