Father's Day building event at TRU (US)

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Thanks to tkatt for news of this event happening on Saturday 15th, 12-2pm:

"Kids, families, Dads! Join Us for a special day-before-Father’s Day LEGO Building Event! Build a LEGO City Police Car together, then bring it home with you!"

Now I have to ask, what sort of language is that? 'bring it home with you' ? If you're in TRU and they allow you to keep the model, surely you 'take it home with you', do you not? Or has America gone mad? :-)

The Free Dictionary says "In most dialects of American English bring is used to denote motion toward the place of speaking or the place from which the action is regarded... Take is used to denote motion away from such a place."

Maybe like 'could care less' instead of the correct 'couldn't care less', and the impolite 'can I get' instead of 'may I have', it is common to speak like that in the US? Fill me in...

56 comments on this article

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By in United States,

This is incorrect. It is not common in American English to say it or write it either. It’s just poor grammar. I would not have guessed that “can I get” is impolite though. As an American planning my first visit to London do you have any other advice?

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By in United States,

Like labrat said, it is incorrect but many teenagers today say 'can I get' and 'could care less'. Believe me I'm a teenager.

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By in United States,

As a USian, I consider anyone who says "can I get" to simply have bad grammar.

As for the promotion itself, I find it amusing they're trying to tie this into 60007 High Speed Chase. A 4-wide with no interior for a minifigure won't look too good next to the vehicles in that set.

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By in United States,

Oh, :P.

I ain't gonna git no Fadder's Day buildin' event's Car-thingy, not with der gas prices nowadays. And I not walkin', either.

JK, trying to make a point. :P

Yes, Huw, we do speak like that in the US. Most of us have a common dislike for Grammar classes, so we don't really care anymore. To tell you the truth, you'd probably get laughed at for correcting someone else's grammar. :P

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By in United States,

It's common in 'Murica. I am often forced to listen to people using bad grammar and completely incorrect words. I sometimes ask for clarification on what others say to me.

Proper English is taught, but rarely is it memorized.

My vocabulary skills are fading away :(

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By in United Kingdom,

Only "could care less" really frustrates me. I must say it does seem somewhat common (although I am sure it is not a fair reflection of American society) to find people from the US misusing words or removing them from the appropriate context.

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By in United States,

Then again, 60007 has been $27 for 3-4 weeks now. Some city sets have been well under MSRP as of late. I'd take 60004, which is only $83. 60003 is also $5 off MSRP. Amazon has 60007 and 60003 slightly less, 60004 matches TRU's price.

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By in United States,

brickset.com: now with 100% more grammar nazi!

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By in United States,

I live in so. California and its worse here. The word "like" is inserted every other word when people speak.

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By in {Unknown country},

Huw, in my experience "bring it home with you" is a normal way to express that thought in modern American English.

I say "can I get" habitually as well. Could/couldn't care/give a/etc doesn't bother me much, it's a minor offense.

Come to The Big Apple and I'll show you some really sad assaults on the common language which separates our countries.

Here in NYC entire words are butchered by huge swaths of the populace and I'm not just talmbout da two youts.

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By in United States,

Yup - the grammar often is very poor. Not just colloquially, either - as we see here, even the big corporations slip up.

In elementary school, my teachers made very clear the difference between "can I get" and "may I have". Now, few people care - although I still use "may" out of politeness.

It's all very unfortunate...

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By in United States,

Huw,

I think too much scrutiny has been used on cheap advertising. However, at least in Texas, "bringing home lunch" is more common than "taking home lunch." The word use in this ad denotes the presence of a third party (probably siblings awaiting your newest acquirement of LEGO) and, at least to me, conveys a more perfect sense of a holiday.

Even after this ad, I can assure you I'm not going to TRU in the nearby future - even IF a 32 piece (?) model is included. Sorry TRU but Midland shoppers are a bit of a harder lot to reach. ;)

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By in United States,

Besides their poor use of the English language, I must also ask myself, why exactly is the build for Father's Day a police car? I mean I can see the heart for Mother's Day but a police car for Father's Day? Maybe it's for when you throw the model out of your car on the way home. :P

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By in United States,

TRU- bad prices and grammer.

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By in United States,

In the Southern U.S. it is common to speak like that but I do agree that it is the wrong use of grammar.

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By in United States,

Huw, to clarify on your comment, America has gone mad. :D

But seriously, shouldn't they give away two cars, one for the kid and one for the dad?
Just an idea...

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By in United States,

Bring it home. --> Motion towards the subject.
Take it from the store. --> Motion away from the subject.

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By in United States,

As a Frenchman living in America, welcome to my world. :D

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By in United States,

I agree it is improper to say it like that, but it's a common habit.

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By in United States,

Irregardless of the grammar, the model ain't got no appeal to me.

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By in Denmark,

I like it, fits with something else "midi" size City I have lying around.

But there is smoe one who will pick up and send it to me?

So I do not have to pay the ridiculous prices on Ebay (when it will be there) ;-)

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By in United States,

lets not focus on the grammer instead about the poorness of the car...how do you consider that city themed! no minifigure no nothing I mean come one if your not going to add atleast a space for a minifigure I say this is a creator set...

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By in United States,

I'm going to say that not only is that expression not uncommon, it isn't wrong either. The reason why it is okay is because of the home. The person reading this ad is most likely assumed to be home when looking at it. As such, the action would be to bring the item back home. Yes, you could argue that it doesn't say "back home" and/or the reader really could be anywhere, but I think it is perfectly acceptable to assume those things, especially when the destination is "home," which is a little special.

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By in United States,

Give me a break.

Mark Stafford, who is FROM the U.K., never even uses the word "than," even when he means it, and no one ever gives him any grief about it.

Actually, a lot of you geniuses don't know how to use those two words, either.

If he can't keep then and than straight, why would you want to pick on some poor copy editor for TRU's advertising arm? It's probably an unpaid intern anyway.

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By in United States,

I believe bring is correct in this case because it shows movement towards "home". We "bring to" and "take from". In this case home is the "to" so bring is correct. Even the Oxford dictionary uses the example "she brought Luke home from the hospital" which is just the past tense of the TRU advertisement. Maybe this is a case of Americans speaking better English than the Brits.

On topic...My kid saw the advertisement and he is really exited to go to this event. I think this is a great set, for being free. Hopefully we get two so I can have one too.

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By in United States,

Love this thread! Grammar Nazi...hahahaha! I was feelin' the build for the Police car for Father's (aka Baby-Daddy) Day. Omg...it's like...totally appropriate for the local TRU in my area.

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By in United States,

Yeeeaaaahh...we're kinda a bunch of dicks over here.

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By in Canada,

I'm a teenager from Canada who says "can I get" - and "couldn't care less".

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By in United States,

Missing another giveaway at TRU, at least this one is horrid.
Honestly, American English is just messed up…

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By in United States,

It reminds me of the older McDONALD'S free sets. I'll try to make it to TRU for this.

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By in Australia,

Americans, well a lot of them say 'Legos' when mentioning more than one Lego brick. That's incorrect as well. Even their leader uses 'Legos'.

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By in Hungary,

Oh, Dad will love this car, trust me. It will fit my (err. his) childhood collection :)

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By in Italy,

The only difference between Americans and British people is that they speak two different languages. Oscar Wilde, if I'm not mistaken. Cheers. Max

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By in United States,

I could, like, care less about grammar, but can I get me some decent legos to take home from TRU?
Also, in my Anglophile Yank experience, people who think the UK is full of proper English speakers are either non-Brits who never have been to the UK, or Brits who assume Americans have never been there and only know what they watch on Downton Abbey or something. The UK has some of the most impenetrable and debased variants of English the world has ever known. Which is well naff innit? No, actually it's what makes the English language so vital.

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By in United Kingdom,

Last year, once, the words "can I get" came out for some reason. I still cringe when I think about it. Forever the awesome memory of meeting the director Alex Cox will be tainted by the knowledge that I bought the ticket in the manner of a total bell-end.

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By in United Kingdom,

Back on topic, that's one unimpressive car. Chunky tyres and SNOT aside, it looks like a design from the early to mid 70s.

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By in United Kingdom,

The shop is called "Toys R Us". I don't think grammar is their strong point.

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By in United Kingdom,

They can't even pronounce the cyrillic reversed 'R' properly - "Toys Ya Us" anyone?

No, what makes me feel queasy is when even the English LEGO Shopping catalogue refers to 'a £49.99 value'. In which circle of Hades did that phraseology originate?

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By in United Kingdom,

@Kramii Best comment of the thread.

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By in United States,

Kids, families, Dads! Join Us for a special day-before-Father’s Day LEGO Building Event! Build a LEGO City Police Car together, then bring it home with you!"

Bad grammar asside. This is ambiguous.

We would like to assume that the kit is a free build. And "bring" should be "take" to be correct.

The problem is is this a build - pay for - take it home? or build - take it home?

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By in United States,

This reminds me of the Cars 2 build from a couple of years ago, and that was a decent build. This one seems less decent - does it have a roof on it?

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By in Ireland,

Now I'm not the best at these things but I'd say take seems correct. Some of the language in American shows just make me cringe however -you'd think writers would know better, or maybe they're trying to make them seem more natural.

Of course every place has its own quirks e.g. in the office (Ireland) I often hear things like 'I done the task you asked me to do. What now?' and when I get emails their and there are switched all the time, apostrophes missed and the spelling...oh the spelling. Of course in Ireland they also learn 2 languages from their first day at school which probably doesn't help.

Me. I failed English twice at school and I write grammar good. :-P

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By in Germany,

Reminds me of set #600!

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By in United States,

So under the Free Dictionary version "bring it home" means to the item is moved to the home rather than being moved away from the store as in "take it home." Therefore both would be correct. I don't know of anyone that would think "can I get" is more impolite than "may I have" or "I'd like" or "I'll have." So yes Huw this is very common in the US. And this aren't even the close bad uses of language. Try knife as a verb or lol as a spoken word for starters.

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By in United States,

Because people generally act like idiots at these free Lego build events. The last two I went to turned out bad, parents throwing elbows and such.

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By in Israel,

Bad grammar is bad grammar. Wuddaya 'spect frum 'muricuh?

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By in Canada,

In Canada we use 'can I get' but that is because of American influence through media and slang etc. I am guilty of using it though I was taught to say 'May I have'. 'Could care less' is both a statement and question even though it is not proper grammar.

Thank god when I was living in England I was able to use my proper grammar so as not to appear totally uncouth. However I have to agree with Huw on noting the improper grammar due to the fact that this is an advert and it is directed towards children not just the parents. How can we expect children to use proper grammar when they are exposed daily with improper grammar?

The car though is quite awful even for a 'creator' model.

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By in United States,

Every country has people that use proper grammer and people that use improper grammer of their native tongue. EVERY COUNTRY. Travel around the world and spend time with various classes and educations and you'll understand. It's snobby to assume only my country has people that use proper grammer...how uncouth of you to use such words that way. I am superior to you, I am great, I know more...oy vey.

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By in United States,

How many times TRU did this kind of event. Wrong grammar maybe, but i don't know how hard for everybody to understand.

"Bring It Home With You", you go to TRU, go to where they stand up in line, TRU Associate will tell you to build this, show you the parts, then after you build, then you can bring it home with you...

Some people here make a simple word or sentence a nonsense topic...

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By in United States,

Bringing home lunch sounds more 'right' than taking home lunch to me. "Bring is used to denote motion toward the place of speaking or the place from which the action is regarded... Take is used to denote motion away from such a place." Maybe I just live in a bad part of the US, but that's strange because I was in all of the advanced and honors English classes.

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By in United States,

"Has the US gone mad?" - Yes.

We decided it's better to not bother teaching real subjects in school and focus on bringing all the children down to the lowest common denominator. In my kids' school their teachers have given up on teaching spelling and grammar. All they care about is if the kid can read and then they unload them on to the next grade. As a result of this, I'm spending a considerable amount of time with them working on spelling, teaching them science and real math, and explaining to them that it IS acceptable to excel at something. I'm practically homeschooling them, but still sending them to a public school to learn how to interact socially with others.

I felt so sad when my oldest was testing at a reading level four grades higher than he is, only to be told that they had to stop testing him because he would be too advanced for the other children in his class. And this is when we open enroll into the better district in our area.

I apologize for the long rant, but we need to get "child psychologists" and social therapists away from the curriculum and just start teaching cold hard math, science, social studies, and practical and proper use of the English language and stop penalizing those who work hard and study, and stop focusing our energy on whether or not taking 100 calories of sugar from a school lunch will suddenly make our children healthy and fit.

Back to topic, it's a free Lego set from TRU when I'm already in the area (actually five, one for each of my kids and I know the guy who does their Lego events, so I get one too!).

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By in United Kingdom,

bring it home means the speaker must be at home.
take it home means the speaker is in a different place.

the error in the tru ad is not grammatical , but lexical.

can I get just sounds horrible to my english ears

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By in United States,

Outside of this grammar argument, I took my son to the event today. It wasn't bad, actually. Every part was in its own container and the children took the pieces out based upon the container label (it said how many of each they needed). I cant speak for every TRU, however the one I visited was not busy at all. The worker had little to do and until the end, my son was the only one there.

I hope they do more of these events - we don't get many LEGO promotion sets over here.

The set, by the way, does not have any number, at least according to the instructions. I can scan the instructions if Huw would like them but I'm not sure on what the set would be categorized as.

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By in United States,

I had a great with my girlfriend, son and niece. We each got ourselves a car. Now we just need to have a massive police chase maybe using creator sets 6910 or 31000

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By in United States,

Also attended the event--pretty good. It was the same type as the Mini Jek 14 Stealth Fighter (Brickset Set No. TRU03). I'm waiting for Brickset to catalog this set so I can add it to my "haves."

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