Review: 42072 WHACK!

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Way back when (well, in 2016) I reviewed 42058 Stunt Bike as my first Technic outing for Brickset and I very much enjoyed the play element offered by the pull back motor and stunt ramp. This year, I've got two more small Technic sets to review in a similar vein and I'll start by looking at 42072 WHACK!

The headlines are £17.99 / €19.99 / $19.99 for 135 pieces, so we're at the same price point and size as before. This time the stunt ramp has been dispensed with in favour of a different play element which we'll examine in a bit. As the name may suggest, along with it's counterpart 42073 BASH! there's going to be some rough roads ahead. Find out more after the break.

Here's the box with a thin person for scale. The front gives away the play features easily.

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The rear of the box shows an alternate 'B' model that can be built by combining 42072 WHACK! and 42073 BASH! together by using some PDF instructions available from the LEGO website.

View image at flickr

Inside there are 3 bags, 2 beams and an instruction booklet with 53 steps...

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...and a mercifully small amount of stickers – just 3.

View image at flickr

The build itself is straightforward and makes for a very strong vehicle indeed. The pull back motor is put into place as one of the first steps and everything stems forward from that.

View image at flickr

At the front of the vehicle there is a small lever mechanism that will activate this years “gimmick”.

View image at flickr

The stickers are applied to the body panels and they are fitted along with some detailing.

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And finally the wheels, engine block and large spoiler to finish. I think it looks quite decent – some kind of mad dune buggy/stock hybrid.

Here's some other angles...View image at flickr

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

...and here it is compared to it's sister set.

View image at flickr

Of course, we have to now talk about the play features – the first of which is the pull back motor. This works very well – as in previous sets. You can get a reasonable turn of speed by pulling back the vehicle just 30cm or so and letting go. I managed to pull it back to about 1.8m before the motor started to go click clack under the strain and then it really flies when you let it loose. My house isn't big enough to get the best out of it but it's fun nevertheless.

Here's what the second play feature is in simple terms – the engine block pops off. It mounts to the front of the vehicle on a couple blue technic pins, and there is a hinged lever mechanism that acts as a bumper. Once the lever is pressed, it prises the block off.

View image at flickr

In reality, as there is little travel on the lever, it takes a good old thump to make it work well. If you only own one of the sets, then the skirting boards in your home will likely be taking a beating. Parents beware – and have a pot of white gloss on standby to touch up your paintwork.

Luckily, I have two different builds handy and my woodwork can remain unscathed – so I'll show you a head to head against 42073 BASH! demonstrated using some fast flash photography. All you have to do is aim them carefully at each other, let them go and wait for the sound of plastic on plastic.

View image at flickr

With my son at one end, and me at the other, we had a little fun.

View image at flickr

Overall

Build wise, there's not much to it, but it has playability by the bundle and really comes into it's own if you have it's sister set and another “player” in your household. There's something definitely satisfying about putting that last wheel on and being able to play with it in a manner that you can't with minifig based sets. In many ways it is a more attractive starter set than the 42084 Hook Loader as it has more "fun" on offer. Throw in the teased alternate build and there's even more reason to own the pair of them.

This years engine blocks are last years ramps, but it's enough to put a different spin on what is quite an old format. These type of sets have been going for 5 years already, so I'm guessing they've proved quite popular – and why not?

The RRP of £17.99 / €19.99 / $19.99 has been the same since the 2014 offerings hit the shelves and I'd conclude that's probably about right. As a comparison, I enjoyed this one more than the Stunt Bike that I previously reviewed. Even if I take the flying engine block feature out of the equation, there is still a good racer at the heart of it.

In conclusion, if you've bought into these pull-back motor sets before, you'll enjoy this one too. If you haven't, it's a good way to dabble with Technic and have some fun play functions to boot. Well worth a look.


Many thanks to the LEGO Group for providing Brickset with a copy of the set. All opinions expressed in this review are my own.

 

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8 comments on this article

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By in United States,

Great review! What camera do you use?

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By in France,

As usual, great and concise review. And awesome action pics!!! Well done! Thank you.

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By in Canada,

You write my favourite reviews on this site. Keep it up!

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By in United States,

Those action shots are amazing!
I have to use the joke that probably only I think is funny: "Yo, this set is WHACK!"

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By in United States,

Before it started to go 'click clack'

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By in Singapore,

Love the action shots. Please do a tutorial!

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By in United States,

These Technic pull-backs are just perfect! Great play value with my kids! Thanks for the review!

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By in Belgium,

Love the action shots especially and the humour which this was written with. Thanks a lot.

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