Random set of the day: Roadside Repair

Posted by ,
Roadside Repair

Roadside Repair

©1999 LEGO Group

Today's random set is 6434 Roadside Repair, released in 1999. It's one of 63 Town sets produced that year. It contains 210 pieces and 5 minifigs, and its retail price was US$50.

It's owned by 398 Brickset members. If you want to add it to your collection you might find it for sale at BrickLink or eBay.


 

Sponsored content

22 comments on this article

Gravatar
By in United States,

I love little Town/City sets like this. It helps build a fun, bustling town.

Gravatar
By in United States,

This set represents Town at its depressing nadir: pre-built chassis reek of laziness and a push towards juniorization. Non-folding roofs and non-existent doors (when curiously present on vehicles in other themes), in addition to a haphazard arrangement of the buildings (featuring large parts). No, even 11 year-old me had enough taste and a solid five years' Town collecting experience to know LEGO could do better. HAD done better. This set, and its ilk from 1998 to 2003, was an insult to the grand legacy built up by the Town theme over the past few decades. Thankfully, things got better, but it's worth noting that in this age of CITY, the charms and elegance of the small-Town life will forever be lost to us save but in sweet memories.

Gravatar
By in United States,

looking back at these sets, I am a bit mortified at how rough they are. The saving grace is that I was just about 5 when they were out and just beginning my journey into Lego, so these were great to my 5 year old brain. Ironically, the thing that probably sent a good chunk of people into the dark ages actually hooked me. who woulda thunk

Gravatar
By in United States,

I used to love this set! So simple, but so much fun. And pretty good minifigure diversity, too, even back then!

Gravatar
By in United States,

@ToaMatoro I feel the same.

Gravatar
By in United States,

$50 210 pieces!?!?!?
LEGO been taxing for decades!!

Gravatar
By in Serbia,

Awful set from an awful time.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Sets from my Dark Ages™ always seem strangely styled and odd-looking. The moody background colouring used in this box art is particularly unnerving!

Gravatar
By in Australia,

Good old Town Jr. You can see what they were trying to do, but ... no, I'm not even gonna defend it. It even looks ghastly. Kid me thought this line was rubbish, and adult me agrees.

Gravatar
By in Norway,

@jeloshot, finally someone else realises this.
Lego prices generally have not risen but gone down if anything. Today's sets have many more parts so it seems prices have gone up.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

I'm glad I'm not the only one who hated the weird simplified flatbed chassis thing they were doing across so many sets around this time. I'm glad I'd already entered the dark ages two years before this, because damn.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Lego creator is the only reason I feel any positive emotions for this era of city. The sets are no good, but the game was great.

Gravatar
By in Australia,

@bananaworld, that's the first thing that struck me too. The odd colour scheme for the buildings don't help either. Dark green, grey and black... just weird.

Gravatar
By in Netherlands,

I have read comments in this and other random sets about price per piece. You should take into account that today's sets tend to have more specialized small pieces. A better comparison would probably be the weight of the pieces. Do we get more plastic for our money? Or the same amount of plastic divided into more smaller pieces.

Gravatar
By in United States,

These are the sets I’d look at in my occasional trip to Toys R Us or Target that made me wonder what was happening at LEGO. I was in college at the time, and I couldn’t help but wonder how the same company that had produced the excellent space port from a few days ago had devolved into this.

Of course we all know the story now, but I was genuinely concerned, when I saw how little shelf space LEGO occupied in the late 90s compared to my childhood memories of the 80s, that the company wouldn’t be around much longer, or would be an online only niche player selling extremely expensive, limited edition kits. Thank goodness they turned it around.

Gravatar
By in United States,

The first dark ages of LEGO, the second dark age is upon us.

Gravatar
By in United States,

If anyone says "But it has baseplates." they must go stand in the corner.

Gravatar
By in United States,

$50 really?!?!? Seems high, even for today, much less for 20 years ago.

Gravatar
By in Turkey,

Juniorization is not a period I miss in the history of Lego.

Gravatar
By in Norway,

Omg, no suprise they almost had to close down in 2004ish

Gravatar
By in United States,

I was born in 1989, so sets like these came out during my prime Lego years. It really was a shame; I probably would have focused more on Lego town if the sets had been better. I recall discovering sets from the 80s and earlier 90s when I started getting on the internet around 1999 or 2000--and even as a ten/eleven-year-old, I liked those older sets a whole lot better.

@Lego Lord Mayorca: It is a shame that the town feel has been lost. City is great, don't get me wrong. But it's different. I've actually started to dismantle my modular MOCs (still working on how to adjust the official modulars) and make them into Town-scale creations, so I can have a cohesive town.

@ewokswithbricks: Normally, I'd argue that baseplates do enhance sets, and that the loss of baseplates is one of my biggest problems with current City sets. In this case, however, the baseplates don't really do much to help how poor the set itself is.

Gravatar
By in United States,

@TeaWeevil

I absolutely agree about baseplates. I was just trying to say that the usual reminiscences of a time when sets included baseplates don't make this set any better. Sorry if that wasn't clear.

Return to home page »