Review: 70827 Ultrakatty & Warrior Lucy

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Unikitty obsessively suppressed any negative emotions for almost the entire duration of The LEGO Movie, finally embracing them during the climactic battle against Lord Business' powerful Micro Managers. Unfortunately, it would appear that her mood has deteriorated after the arrival of aliens from the planet DUPLO!

70827 Ultrakatty & Warrior Lucy is probably the most ferocious version of Unikitty yet, taking more inspiration from a lion than a kitten! The model was unveiled at San Diego Comic-Con and I think it looks fantastic in official images, due primarily to its spiky appearance. Hopefully its articulation will be similarly impressive.

Minifigures

The majority of Bricksburg's original residents from The LEGO Movie have been updated to reflect the challenging environment of Apocalypseburg, wearing appropriately rugged attire. Emmet, on the other hand, remains dressed in his orange construction fatigues! This uniform is almost identical to that from the original film, albeit with a few scratches across the reflective metallic silver strips and the black belt.

70827 Ultrakatty & Warrior Lucy!

Emmet's personality also remains unchanged based upon his double-sided head, featuring a smile on one side and a terrified expression on the other! The same reddish brown hair piece remains intact as well. It would seem that Emmet still finds time to comb his hair, even following an invasion by DUPLO aliens!

70827 Ultrakatty & Warrior Lucy!

Lucy abandoned the Wyldstyle moniker towards the end of The LEGO Movie and this minifigure has been accordingly updated, although certain aspects of her clothing remain intact. For instance, some striking magenta and medium azure graffiti decorates both sides of the torso and each arm. The hair includes matching streaks alongside a pair of goggles.

70827 Ultrakatty & Warrior Lucy!

However, the heroine now features dual-moulded legs which represent her sturdy boots and a reddish brown headscarf fits around her neck. This component is quite similar to the scarf that was created for The LEGO NINJAGO Movie and it looks wonderful, including realistic texture and a folded hood at the rear. The head is decorated with two expressions, one of which appears happy while the other seems prepared for battle.

70827 Ultrakatty & Warrior Lucy!

The minifigure also wields suitable accessories for combat, carrying a pearl dark grey crossbow and a quiver containing some additional bolts. However, my favourite element is definitely the shield which is based upon a classic stop sign. This has been customised and reflects Lucy's determination to defend Apocalypseburg from the alien invaders.

View image at flickr

The Completed Model

One such alien from the planet DUPLO appears in this set and it looks marvellous. I love how standard LEGO bricks have been employed to recreate the enlarged scale of DUPLO and the printed eye, which can rotate when a Technic pin is turned at the rear, is quite intimidating. Moreover, the mouth opens on a hinge, revealing two studs which form teeth inside.

View image at flickr

Unfortunately, the same DUPLO alien design appears in several sets from The LEGO Movie 2 which is slightly disappointing as we have already seen that there is considerable variation between them in the film. This lime green and blue colour scheme is unique and I think the figure looks good but an entirely unique alien would have been preferable, either in this set or some of the others.

View image at flickr

Numerous different versions of Unikitty have been produced since 2014 and Ultrakatty is the largest by a considerable margin, measuring 21cm in length when the tail is extended. This model is based upon a lion rather than smaller cats so appears entirely different to the other angry Unikitty figures, although its red, reddish brown and flame yellowish orange colour scheme is familiar and I think that looks good here.

View image at flickr

Ultrakatty's head is also similar in design to standard Unikitty figures, featuring an enlarged horn and ears along with a dark bluish grey helmet. The metallic silver studs which appear on Apocalypseburg Unikitty in 70831 Emmet's Dream House / Rescue Rocket are represented by a bracket on this model and I like the reddish brown spikes on either side of the helmet.

View image at flickr

Many more spikes are fitted around the head, resembling a lion's mane. These blades were originally introduced for the Castle theme in 2007 but have not appeared in reddish brown before and they look fantastic. Each blade is attached using a clip so they can move back and forth which is very useful for creating dynamic displays and they line up nicely with the spines on Ultrakatty's back.

View image at flickr

Furthermore, three facial expressions are included. These are printed on a new 1x5x2 brick which is interesting as remarkably few LEGO pieces are five studs wide. The expressions encompass a range of emotions, including an adorable smile, a frustrated expression and a third which seems extremely angry! A corresponding design appeared on the Super Angry Kitty figure from 70817 Batman & Super Angry Kitty Attack in 2015.

There are several points of articulation, including a ball joint behind the head and on each hip. Hinges are found at the lower knee and ankle joints which is satisfactory, although ball joints would have been preferable at the ankles to ensure that the feet remain planted. I like the spiky texture that continues on the legs and four printed 1x2 curved slopes which are decorated with flames also appear just above the feet.

View image at flickr

Ultrakatty is protected by some armour plating above her forelegs. These curved slopes are ingeniously attached using small wheel axles so they can move to accommodate the changing position of the hips. Two more stickers are applied between the legs, presumably representing leather padding which has suffered damage during battle against the DUPLO invaders.

View image at flickr

Lucy can ride on Ultrakatty's back and grip the dark bluish grey reins. This looks pretty good but there are no dedicated clips to keep her weapons which is slightly disappointing. You can store her shield on the handlebars beside the saddle and removing the spikes in front would provide room to mount Lucy's crossbow there, although a proper storage area should have been included.

The hind legs and tail are both connected to a separate section of Ultrakatty's body that can move on click hinges. This is a welcome feature and the tail is extremely poseable, including four separate ball joints. In addition, viewing the model from behind reveals some reddish brown spines on the hind legs. They commonly appear on insects such as grasshoppers and are an appealing inclusion here, helping to convey how dangerous this furious version of Unikitty really is!

View image at flickr

Overall

70827 Ultrakatty & Warrior Lucy is an outstanding set. Ultrakatty looks absolutely spectacular, bristling with more than seventy spikes of varying sizes and colours which appear deadly! The three alternative expressions are excellent and I appreciate the integration of a saddle for a minifigure to ride. However, the leg articulation is somewhat limited by the absence of ball-jointed ankles, unfortunately.

View image at flickr

Nevertheless, I am very satisfied with this set and would certainly recommend it. The price of £24.99 or $29.99 seems reasonable and the minifigures are superb, despite being relatively common. In addition, many interesting pieces are included so I might even be tempted to purchase an additional set when it is discounted later in the year.

I hope you have found this review informative. Let us know by liking this article and share your thoughts on the set in the comments below.

32 comments on this article

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By in United States,

There's now a 5 stud brick!?! Please make more of those Lego!!

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By in United States,

I'm interested in this set and planned to purchase it after seeing the movie. However, the set is currently discounted to $24 on Amazon in the US so waiting for a few more weeks is unlikely.

I'm surprised that almost all of the LEGO Movie 2 sets are already discounted at Amazon and Walmart.

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By in United States,

Did you see that this can combo with Emmet's escape buggy? No idea how that's done.

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By in United Kingdom,

I should probably stop reading reviews on here as I go from not being interested in a set to wanting multiple copies of them.

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By in United Kingdom,

^^^ no such luck here in uk on Amazon. Discounts will appear nearer to movie release probably. I already have this set (unopened) so must find time to build it.

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By in Netherlands,

Decent but I'd rather buy Benny's Space Squad three times for that pricetag.

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By in United States,

Good review! I have loved Unikitty since the previous LEGO Movie, and it's really cool to see her get such an epic new form for battle… even if it doesn't look as cuddly as her previous incarnations! This set definitely has a lot of the same strengths as other brick-built creatures I've enjoyed such as those from LEGO Ninjago, LEGO Legends of Chima, and LEGO Elves.

I can't help but be reminded of bizarre past attempts to create more masculine counterparts to product lines loved by girls, such as the "Battle Trolls" of the early 90s: https://www.figurerealm.com/actionfigure?action=seriesitemlist&id=879

As far as the LEGO Movie's metanarrative goes, it makes sense that as Finn gets older his interests in cute and silly forms of play might shift towards stuff that seems more edgy and "grown-up" as he faces peer pressure to become more mature and masculine.

A lot of the LEGO Movie 2 sets and marketing play around with preconceptions about gender in some interesting ways, and this set is no exception. It's without a doubt closer to the aggressive, gritty aesthetic of the other Apocalypseburg sets than to the bright, curvy aesthetic of the Systar System sets, but 2/3 of its named characters are female.

Granted, in the context of LEGO as a whole, this is not all that unusual — even in mainly boy-targeted themes like Ninjago, Legends of Chima, and Nexo Knights, there have been several sets with a majority-female cast including #70133-1 (2/3 female), #70229-1 (2/3 female), #70349-1 (2/3 female), #70625-1 (3/4 female), #70641-1 (2/3 female), and #70651-1 (3/4 female). But here, in a theme which also includes sets with more overtly "girly" designs, it provides some particularly interesting contrast.

Overall this set offers lots of interesting value as a parts pack, a character pack, a building experience, and/or a play experience. It's definitely on my wish list! Thanks for the review!

@TheTeenageBrickster: Instructions for the combination model are here: https://www.lego.com/r/www/r/service/-/media/franchises/customer%20service/the%20lego%20movie/70827_70829_combined_bi_web_low.pdf

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By in United Kingdom,

^ When it comes to counting genders, and children identifying themselves with them, I don't think animals matter so much. I would imagine most people would count this as 1:1 Emmet and Lucy, with most boys identifying with Emmet and girls with Lucy.

Although it is a bit odd that Unikitty gets a mane when transforming to Unikatty. Is this really a mane, or just crazy hair sticking out all over the place.

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By in Netherlands,

^ Unikitty doesn't actually get those spikes from transforming, they are just part of her armor

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By in United States,

I got this set along with Benny’s Space Squad, as this was the cheapest way to get the 2 main characters and one of those brick built duplo figures. Plus the build for Unikitty looks pretty nice.

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By in United Kingdom,

@Aanchir This set sets an example of a good set: appealing to both male and female fans. However, I do not think that the inclusion of Mini Dolls is a good idea due to the lack of appeal to boys. Equally, Avengers sets should include some more of the important female characters from Infinity War, such as Scarlett Witch or Nebula.

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By in Hungary,

@DecR504: King Katdorah? That's an amazing alternate build with using all of her three heads.

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By in United States,

@Anak: I know, and it looks great. I just stumbled across that channel a couple weeks ago and they have some really nice alternative builds.

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By in United States,

@FowlerBricks the dump truck bed from 2015's city mining subtheme is 5 studs wide

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By in United States,

Man, I gotta have this. What a superb-looking set! Awesome review!

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By in United States,

@DaftArcher20968: Why assume mini-dolls won't have appeal to boys? I feel like if you assume that then you need to also confront the fact that many girls feel the same way about traditional figs, and ask yourself why boys' preferences should be more important than theirs.

I don't know if it's entirely a true assumption in the first place, though—especially not when faced with a mini-doll character as cool looking as Sweet Mayhem. She may not be the same as the figs most boys are used to, but different doesn't have to mean bad, and I hope that this movie and its associated sets helps to bridge the gap between "boys sets" and "girls sets" the same way that crossovers like The Lego Movie and Lego Dimensions have already done for a wide range of other themes.

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By in United States,

@Lyichir: I completely agree! Back when the sets were released on the 26th, the set I actually had my eyes on was #70828, but ended up with #70841 and #70834 because of the inclusion of Apocalypseburg Benny and Sweet Mayhem.

Tbh, anyone would be lucky to have Sweet Mayhem in their collection. She's superb.

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By in United States,

@Lyichir:
Before Friends came out, I remember seeing a little girl and her mother in TRU, where the mother asked the girl if she wanted to go look at the LEGO section and the girl replied that, "Those are for boys". Nevermind that it was located on the opposite side of the store, with the girls section smack in between, but in her mind the two were inextricably linked.

I'd also seen, when the local LEGO Store opened and they were serving up S2, all the girls wanted the Pop Star, Witch, and Lifeguard because they were females. I still see a strong drive with the young girls to collect the female CMFs, and I noted previously that this wave has 9/20 females which is not only the highest quantity I can remember them including, it's also the closest they've come to a 50/50 split. So, I'd thought for a bit that maybe once Friends broke the ice, girls became interested in more than just the minidolls range of sets, but after remembering the S2 launch makes me think it's more that they just had terrible gender representation at that point.

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By in United Kingdom,

Great set, finished building it a few days ago. This was one of my must buys for the wave. And it was nice to get an extra Emmet hairpiece to add to the collection.

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By in United Kingdom,

I'm not really planning to buy any of the TLM2 sets... but if I did, it would be this one, if I found it on a discount. I've low-key had an eye on it since the first pictures became available, and this review just cements for me the fact that Unikitty's new form is really cool.

Plus, as someone who never got any sets from the first movie, Wyldstyle and Emmet would not be unwelcome additions to my collection either ^^

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By in United States,

@CCC: If we were talking about a generic animal figure like a dog or a cat I might agree, but characters like Unikitty, Puppycorn, Rocket Raccoon, Sonic the Hedgehog, etc. are arguably just as much people as they are animals. They speak, typically act according to reason and emotion rather than instinct or training, and are more or less treated as equals by the rest of the cast.

I have no doubt that there are a lot of girls out there who identify as much with Unikitty on an emotional level as they might with animal characters from the sorts of brands that helped inspire her design, like Hello Kitty or My Little Pony.

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By in United Kingdom,

@Lyichir: I know what you mean, don't get me wrong, but standard minifigures are more posable and versatile in the Lego system. I would happily have more female minifigures- whether they're male or female doesn't really matter most the time- but a set with minidolls instead is instantly less appealing.
To spin it the other way, is there anything particularly masculine about standard minifigures? They're more blocky but that's to be expected in a brick system. I don't see that they more closely resemble typical boy action figures than girl dolls. Their customisability alone could suggest otherwise. If Lego was initially targeted at girls, would this same situation exist in reverse?
The point should be to make minifigures that appeal to all lego fans, not barely compatible figures of different types at a similar scale as that kind of takes away from what makes Lego different from any other toy.

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By in United States,

@jol: Minidolls do have a different set of advantages and disadvantages than minifigures, it's true. Yes, mini-dolls have less articulation, but they also have greater realism and detail as well as a few other advantages that might not be obvious to people who don't play with them (for instance, it requires much less space to seat two mini-dolls side by side than two minifigures, making six-wide vehicles with both a driver and passenger seat much easier to design).

Here's a counter spin to your spin—what is inherently feminine about mini-dolls? After all, they come in both boy and girl varieties. The tricky thing is that their introduction had very little to do with making more "feminine" figures and much more to do with creating figures designed for an audience of girls who for the most part weren't playing with Lego at anywhere near the same rate as boys.

There are a number of good articles out there on the design process for the mini-doll, but suffice to say they were designed in response to a very real problem. There was a substantial gender gap in Lego's audience and Lego did a great amount of research and focus testing to get to the bottom of what it was. And the figure was one of the sticking points they found—not because it was too "masculine" or because girl figures weren't as common, but rather because it was so highly abstracted that girls couldn't relate to them well. The research showed that compared to boys, who tended to play with figures in the third person ("with" the characters), girls preferred to play in the first person ("as" the characters), and the geometric, simplified forms of the minifigure provided a barrier to that.

You can be certain that if this were an issue that could have been solved as easily as "making more girl minifigures" Lego would have done so in an instant—it would have been far, far easier and cheaper to do so than to develop an entirely new figure design.

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By in United States,

Just bought it last night!

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By in United States,

They could just give us some real Duplo pieces lol

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By in Hungary,

@vader11: Yes, I agree with you, that would be even more fun. Besides, I like this set.

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By in United States,

@jol:
Minifigs look chiseled and angular, where minidolls have curves that don't need to be painted on. And perception based on tradition. That's really about it.

@Lyichir:
Like heck they are. Minidolls look like someone stood a Barbie in front of the Joker Manor mirror. They've got proportions bordering on Mr. Mackey from South Park, with heads that are roughly 1/3 or more of their bodies by volume. They're mutants, plain and simple. As for the width, I've got somewhere between 40-50 6-wide cars that all seat two minifigs in each row (most are 2-seaters with bucket seats, but some have bench seats and/or rear seats. The only thing I had problems with in that regard is the one design that has a rumble seat.

@vader11:
They did. They're in the Duplo set.

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By in United States,

@Purple Dave: Uhh… so your objection to the idea of the mini-doll being more lifelike than the minifigure is that their heads are exaggerated in size? Sort of like traditional minifigures’ heads are? You’re really straining your credibility with that one. Even taking into account their exaggerated heads, hands, and feet, all of which are designed that way for the sake of compatibility with existing parts, the mini-doll is without a doubt still a lot more human-shaped than the minifigure.

And I have no doubt plenty of AFOLs have created 6-wide vehicles that fit driver and passenger side by side. But that usually entails working with jumper plates and SNOTted side walls and so forth, stuff that’s unlikely to show up at a 5+ or 6+ City/Friends building level. Whereas the mini-doll makes it easier to sit figures side by side without any need for a full stud separating them at all times.

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By in United States,

@Aanchir:
_MY_ objection to the minidolls is that the design sucks hosewater. They have monolegs and fused wrists. They can't ride bicycles, they can't sit on horses, they're limited to action poses that involve standing still, and their heads are about twice the size of their torsos where minifigs are the opposite (which is far closer to real human physiology).

http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?i=3468346
http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?i=3688312
http://www.brickshelf.com/cgi-bin/gallery.cgi?i=5076065

And I'm terrible about taking pics of my MOCs, so these appear to be the only three regular cars I've ever posted. Other than a couple Batmobiles, the Pixar Cars cars, and the rumble seat design seen on the red car, all of my cars seat minifigs side-by-side, and all of them have working doors. I do miss out on the ability to do sculpted doors like you see on exotic sports cars, but none of my cars go driverless, and none of them have "central seating". My only major problem is that available doors really limit the range of colors I can choose from, but even that has a potential workaround if I stacked a 1x3x1 door on top of a 1x2x1 panel (and constantly tweaked the angle of the doors since they wouldn't have any studs to restrict their movement). Yes, it requires jumper plates, but the SNOT involved is limited to the cheese wedges right behind the doors (since replaced with double cheeses) and tiles to fill the gap between the cheese wedges (originally 1x4's, but since replaced with 2x4's), and only necessary for bucket seats. A bench seat doesn't need any SNOT at all.

And because they're minifigs, all of my drivers even have one hand on the wheel at all times. Not adjacent to it. Rotated to about a 45 degree angle and wrapped around the wheel itself.

Doing it in a set wouldn't be difficult at all. They've made several dedicated vehicle bases in the past. If they made one that incorporated the jumper plates, it'd space the seats apart just enough to fit two minifigs, while adding a ridge would allow those doors to be used without being able to cave in on the back edge. This would allow them to create an even more stable connection for the seats, since they could be attached to four studs each where mine only connect to one in the center.

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By in United States,

^I mean, obviously taste is subjective, and often comes down to which strengths or weaknesses matter more to you individually. For example, you’ve clearly decided that you care more about how the waist measurement compares to the width of the head than how the waist measurement compares to the total height, the latter of which is far more realistic in the mini-doll’s case (the mini-doll’s waist circumference is around half their height, while the minifigure’s is greater than their entire height).

The lack of independent leg movement is a consequence of the narrower hips, but one that the target audience of the mini-doll saw as a worthwhile sacrifice for the sake of a more lifelike appearance. As for the lack of rotating wrists, a version of the mini-doll that did have rotating wrists was tested with kids during the development process. But it turns out girls tended to prefer a smooth arm to one that ends in a cuffed sleeve shape at the wrist like the classic minifigure arm.

Mini-dolls can “sit” on horses the same way minifigures do — with the horses and saddles designed for them. They even have bridles that they can hold, something traditional LEGO minifigures and horses lack. Mini-dolls can ride bicycles and motorcycles and mopeds just fine, and do so in several sets, even if the hands don’t necessarily wrap around the handlebars. Ultimately, a lot of that depends on whether the design in question was created before or after the mini-doll’s introduction, so it’s a bit unfair to expect 100% compatibility with those parts. After all, if the mini-doll been designed first, would you be here criticizing the minifigure for not having 100% compatibility with parts designed for mini-dolls?

Because of their narrower and less square shoulders, mini-dolls with long hair can rotate their heads further than minifigures with hair the same length. Mini-dolls with skirts, full length gowns, or mermaid tails can bend a full 90 degrees at the hips, unlike most minifigures with those same traits. The mini-doll also has a nose, and a chin, and a more rounded body and legs… all things that add to its realism. By default they have realistic skin tones and detailed eyes with discrete whites, irises, and pupils.

It’s fine if you prefer the minifigure’s more abstract and simplified style, but that doesn’t somehow negate the ways that the mini-doll is more human-like, nor the preferences of the many people who prefer those kinds of traits in a toy figure and have been able to better enjoy LEGO play thanks to the mini-doll’s introduction.

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