Random set of the day: Multi-Challenge Race Track

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Multi-Challenge Race Track

Multi-Challenge Race Track

©2003 LEGO Group

Today's random set is 8364 Multi-Challenge Race Track, released in 2003. It's one of 20 Racers sets produced that year. It contains 623 pieces, and its retail price was US$89.99/£69.99.

It's owned by 328 Brickset members. If you want to add it to your collection you might find it for sale at BrickLink or eBay.


16 comments on this article

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By in United States,

Exactly what is a Drome? Drome is a suffix, not a noun. So what is Drome Racing?

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By in Canada,

A drome is a place for racing such as a "velodrome" where they race bicycles. It comes from the Greek word dromos meaning run or course. So one would assume it is like saying race track racers, a bit redundant.

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By in United States,

How (and how well) does the rechargeable function on these cars work? I looked at this set a few days ago on here and was a bit confused. I'm sure not too well seeing as this was the ONLY set that used this technology and setup. I'm sure if I bought a used example, the batteries inside the cars would be worn out or ruined. Wonder if Lego could get into slot cars? I know Scalextric has a few Quick Build cars that can accept LEGO parts, and there was some company in Spain or somewhere that had LEGO type slot car sets.

A really neat feature!

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By in United States,

The Drome Racers theme was a theme from 2002 to 2004 that featured character and story elements. As a kid I liked it a lot, and along with Bionicle and Star Wars were my favorite themes of the early 2000s. The main setting was the Drome, a massive racing venue with multiple biomes that could be changed at will by the venue’s overlord Dromulus. City, desert, swamps, and icy mountains were all portrayed on the box art and supplemental materials. There were also distinct racing teams, like Nitro, HOT, RED, Exo, and Maverick. They had their different personalities, color schemes, with Nitro being the “hero” team and Exo being more villainous. The sets were variously sold as individual cars or pairs of cars (in various combinations of the teams). They ranged from small go-kart size cars, to larger system cars, to even larger technic cars, and RC ones. A lot of them featured pull-back motors of various types and strengths. It was a fairly ambitious theme all things considered, and I remember it fondly.

This particular set was definitely one of those “too good to be true” ones I never had. They made three different “track sets” of this type: a straight line stunt track, a U shaped jungle track, and this one as the largest one. The cars featured fully plastic wheels on their front axles, as rubber ones would have caused the the cars to stop from rubbing up against the track barriers.

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By in New Zealand,

Oh wow! Hey lego, I would buy this!

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By in Latvia,

Actually, it's quite cool to get a set that has a complete racetrack, even though it's for small cars

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By in United States,

This is a perfect example of the types of things Lego experimented with during its crisis period. This set has lots of cool, fun functions that no other set has ever done - but to achieve those, it requires huge electronic control/charging units, sealed electronic car chassis, a track system with enormous parts that have never been used before or since, and a number of specialized paddle parts that are also fairly large parts that have seen next to no use. Was it fun? I'm sure it was. Was it Lego's domain? No - Hot Wheels and Matchbox dominate that market, and Lego was asking for trouble by investing so much money in this one, unique set for a segment of the toy industry in which it had never previously competed. It's important to experiment with themes, building styles, new parts, and even new play concepts in order to stay fresh and competitive, but risks like this are unwise. Compare this set to the Creator Expert roller coaster released in 2018: that also relies on large, specialized parts for the track, but those track parts have been designed to be as useful as possible in many settings and have been successfully applied to multiple themes. The roller coaster needs a large electric component in the form of the motor, but that's a plug-and-play Power Functions motor that is sold separately and is used widely in Technic. Finally, the roller coaster is a very expensive and unique set, but it's a measured risk because it's primarily aimed at the segment of AFOLs with deep pockets who had been begging for a roller coaster for years, rather than an experimental plunge into a separate segment of the children's toy market that is already dominated by a pair of giant, established firms.

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By in Singapore,

I was aware of the existence of this set, but as I was right on the edge of my Dark Ages and had kept myself entertained with that year's Designer Sets and X-Pods and the previous year's Racers sets I never developed a desire for it. I had #4586-1 Stunt Race Track from the previous year, which got old quickly as it was such a short obstacle course. There was also #4588-1 Off-Road Race Track that I didn't get, which was the more substantial U-shaped track Brickwright mentions with two cars but still not a full circuit like this was (my two-racer sets were #4593-1 Zero Hurricane and Red Blizzard and #4595-1 Zero Tornado & Hot Rock).

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By in United States,

Always wanted this set as a kid. I was somewhat into hotweels and matchbox stuff (though not anywhere near as much as Lego), and I'm now just realizing how perfect this set melds the two together.

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By in Australia,

Huwbot keeps to the Racers theme.

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By in United States,

This is what I love about random set of the day--seeing oddball sets like this one I had never heard of before. It's pretty rare, however, that the random part of the equation actually produces an interesting result like this one. I'd love to see a series of articles here talking about these LEGO oddities, highlighting them individually and giving more information about them (as some of this article's comments did).

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By in United States,

Forza Horizon 4 (Xbox) recently added a Lego Racers DLC.

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By in United States,

This one's been sitting on the shelf at work for like a year. Apparently no one wants it, but I think it's cool, if a bit odd.

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By in Spain,

@cody6268 the cars don't have batteries. They use capacitors, so they are not damaged when charging like batteries, and also they are easy to replace in case of any problem. This was a smart technical solution to guarantee long life.

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By in United States,

These sets were easily found on deep, deep clearance sales a few months after release. I bought it for parts, but we tried the racetrack briefly. Really it couldn't compete with my son's Hot Wheels track sets, and it quickly became forgotten.

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By in Germany,

Even though this was the largest of the race tracks, the Offroad Race Track was much more interesting.

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