Random set of the day: Super Rescue Complex

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Super Rescue Complex

Super Rescue Complex

©1999 LEGO Group

Today's random set is 6464 Super Rescue Complex, released in 1999. It's one of 63 Town sets produced that year. It contains 334 pieces and 6 minifigs, and its retail price was US$76.

It's owned by 223 Brickset members. If you want to add it to your collection you might find it for sale at BrickLink or eBay.


29 comments on this article

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By in United Kingdom,

"My trike's front light isn't working, can you fix it?"

"Sure thing guv, lemme just haul it in the air with these chains"

"But it's just a faulty light, why do you need access to the bottom?"

"...truth be told it just looks really bloomin' cool aye"

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By in United States,

There's a dude in this set named "Leather Jacket".

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By in United States,

That is one super complex rescue.

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By in Brazil,

Ah, the dark days of the Town line...

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By in United States,

I had this one. Talk about bare bones.

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By in United States,

The most annoying thing about this set is that the helicopter doesn't match the miniature police station or literally any other police model of the era.

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By in United States,

I may be in the minority, but I miss the days when baseplates came with sets. . .

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By in United States,

@SinKiller Nick
I hear you

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By in Australia,

So as Juniorised as this set is, it actually looks like a modernised version of the classic 80s/90s sets with plates we’ve recently had as RSOTD.

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By in United Kingdom,

@SinKiller Nick - You are not alone. I wish Lego would go back to baseplates in sets. Buildings on plates look a complete mess when arranged with road base plates.

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By in United States,

Juniorized as in the current line of Junior sets.

Might be acceptable for a kid who wants to rip it out of the box, build the entire set in less than an hour and have fun.

Most of the rest of us why are trying to build actual towns for display would go with a similar older Tiwn ... or a City set.

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By in United States,

@SinKiller Nick You are not alone.

The days when Lego sets were made of as few pieces as possible.

Dark Times...

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By in Australia,

For its target audience I think this is a great set! After all, these days a Juniorised officially 'City' set would cost more then this but have far far less.

Lego NEEDS to bring back baseplates in sets, I know that they arent technically in scale with everything else but all the modulars are on baseplates + roadplates so how could they ever get rid of them all together (which has been suggested in interviews with Lego representatives). Proper plates made in 32x32, with flat surfuaces in the middle in the same style as current road plates would be great, although the transition between baseplate to real plates would be too great.

I also really wish Lego would at the very least 1. make all colours for 32x32 baseplate available at the one time. I dont know what nutcase wants to swap between sand and water (tan and blue) baseplates every few years. 2. release other sizes, particularly 16x32 and 16x16!

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By in New Zealand,

Those trikes are fun

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By in Netherlands,

Strictly Briks offers 32x32 (base)plates in about 60 different colours. They are the thickness of standard plates though and can even be used as such, for example as levels/stories in buildings.

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By in Australia,

@AustinPowers Thanks for sharing, still it would be better if lego themselves did that...

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By in United Kingdom,

It would be interesting to know how the set designers of the era felt about their creations. Were they proud of them or were they constrained by a brief they didn't agree with? Certainly an interesting (and dark) period.

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By in Finland,

It's funny how it's called "complex" even though the building process clearly isn't that complex.

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By in United States,

Am I the only one who actually doesn't like baseplates? It's always so hard to find where the first few layers of plates and bricks go on the baseplate, and when you're done it's hard to pick up the buildings and move them around because the baseplate is much less stiff than a full-depth plate. Modern buildings don't give quite as much of a "sense of place" without the baseplates, but they sure are easier to build and pick up and move. That said, I sure wish Lego would bring back the crater plates and landing plates from classic Space.

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By in Australia,

It's like, you could see that they were *trying* to build a city centre, for all these Juniorised sets, but it just didn't quite work.

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By in Netherlands,

@Brickchap: indeed it would, but the chances imho of LEGO doing that are practically zero. They seem to hate all things baseplate nowadays. Pity.

@iwybs: apparantly you are ;-)

Joking aside, I don't get your arguments. I actually find stuff built on baseplates easier to pick up and carry around than without. Take the Friends line of buildings for example, with all their garden extentions and modular components. It takes ages when we want to move around these buildings on my daughters' layout whereas buildings on baseplates can just be picked up in their entirety without having to fear that everything will fall apart. I also can't second the experience that baseplates would be "less stiff". Perhaps the ones sold in the US market are made of a different more wobbly material? The ones I have are very hard and solid, even more so when built up.
And about hard to find where to start? Sure, you have to count the studs, but isn't a bit of a challenge part of the fun of building? Or are people nowadays so spoilt by TLG's totally dumbed down instructions that they can't handle simple tasks like that anymore? I wouldn't hope so.

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By in Netherlands,

You know, if they'd just left the helicopter out this set would've been really good. Yes, it's 2 small buildings and some weird arches garage. But those 2 buildings are functional for play. It's also 2 baseplates and some vehicles. It's really not bad.
The helicopter however doesn't look very good, that should've been a patrol car.

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By in United Kingdom,

I have a slightly different opinion on this set, as it was one of the first ones I ever had. Yes, it's VERY juniorised and some of it looks a bit odd, to say the least. But, for the target audience (i.e. young kids), this set was great. It provided many, many hours of play, and it also came with a booklet full of other ideas and things that the set could be rebuilt in to. I can fully understand why people gave this a miss at the time, and why they probably wouldn't consider getting it now, especially since all of the City stuff is far superior. That being said, I still have very, very fond memories of this set.

Also, I do think that more baseplates should be included in sets, as it is a great way of starting off a city or town. But it probably doesn't make sense from a business point of view, as LEGO can make more by keeping the baseplates separate. I really hope they never get rid of them entirely, as they are perfect for making larger creations.

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By in United Kingdom,

To be fair, if what I've read is accurate, the 'Town Jr.' line wasn't a result of any inadequacy on the part of the set designers; I remember hearing that, rather, Lego's management had got the mistaken impression that what kids wanted in that day and age was an 'instant gratification play experience', so they did the most they could to provide that without removing the concept of building entirely.

I think we can agree that the end results of that experiment speak for themselves... and Lego did realise the error of that line of thinking a few years later. Still, I personally find it interesting that there was specific reasoning behind their trying of this approach, no matter how flawed it may have been.

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By in Germany,

"334 pieces and 6 minifigs, retail price was US$76" looks like we got another Imperial Star Destroyer here ;)

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By in France,

rather like a disney princess set

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By in United States,

@darthnorman

Even the build is, in the words of Henrik Andersen, "Not a hard build, just long"

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By in United States,

Not LEGO's finest hour... although look at all of those great road signs! Does anyone remember the road signs accessories set (6315)? It was only a few dollars and had all of those accurate Speed, Stop, Parking, etc. signs to really made a city look good. LEGO, if you're listening, please bring them back.

Ps. And baseplates, lots of baseplates in several colors and sizes avail. at the same time! Thanks :)

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By in United States,

You know, it's tempting to compare the incredible simplified blockiness of the design to, say, Assembly Square, or comment on how $76 for 334 pieces is an economic disaster, or maybe just point out the weird asymmetry of the small baseplate used on the trike repair shop. But, this set is probably really fun for five-year olds, and they can build their first town by connecting other baseplates to the ones they have here. I don't go around bashing Duplo for being overly simplistic, and hopefully the kids whose first System sets were Town Jr. in'99 grew up into AFOLs building Modular.

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