Random set of the day: Rapid River Village

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Rapid River Village

Rapid River Village

©2002 LEGO Group

Today's random set is 6763 Rapid River Village, released in 2002. It's one of 3 Western sets produced that year. It contains 343 pieces and 7 minifigs, and its retail price was US$70.

It's owned by 618 Brickset members. If you want to add it to your collection you might find it for sale at BrickLink or eBay.


36 comments on this article

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By in Australia,

How popular were these re-releases?
I feel like they would absolutely go off nowadays.

A cool set anyway, those teepees are lovely.

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By in New Zealand,

Wow! What a play set! Painted horseys, baseplate and look at those tree trunks! Woo woo woo woo! That snake looks delicious too.

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By in United States,

TLG really needs to bring back a Western theme. Just think how good all these old cowboy and Indian sets could look with today’s pieces and building techniques.

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By in United States,

Insert all the people wanting this theme back.

I'm not saying it isn't possible but forever ago there was a Random Set of the Day that sparked a conversation about a theme resergence: https://brickset.com/article/38781/random-set-of-the-day-boulder-cliff-canyoncomments It's worth the read, there's a lot of good points brought up.

I definitely don't think it would be possible in this same way. People are a lot more conscientious about culture and this is a mishmash of so many different Native American cultures that it's just not a good idea today. With enough care, I think we could see a return of the Western Theme with everyone included from cowboys, banditos, frontiersman, and natives, and a few other groups of people that weren't included in the initial theme like prospectors and miners, steam engine train folk, and just plain old storefront town citizens, but you would also need to have a market for it that wasn't so niche.

How well would Western themed sets do in anywhere but North American markets? It's a very specific thing ingrained in Americana because it takes place here and it's not exactly something that I see being very global. Castle is typically European, but the North and South American Markets are primarily composed of European descendants and there are amazing tales with wizards and magical creatures and not just warring countries of humans. Martial Arts became so widespread thanks to exploitative films and every major city in the US having a Karate studio for kids that it makes anything Ninja related cool, and right now, Ninjago is still blowing up because of the fantastical elements added like elemental powers and hoard villains composed of monsters half the time. If ever there was an Adventurers reboot or successor, that's an excuse to travel all over the world, I'm sure everyone has that fantasy at one point or another. And space is just universally enjoyed because it can be whatever you want from hard science to wacky aliens. What makes Western sell beyond North America, and are kids even interested in such a thing these days? I'm really curious.

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By in United States,

@MCLegoBoy: "Forever ago" being actually one year today...

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By in United States,

Alright! Western! One of my top 5 favorite themes! Unfortunately this is one of 2 or 3 western sets that I don't own :(

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By in Australia,

I feel like a western theme would work if you omitted the Indigenous residents of the prairies and open plains. Yeah, exclusion kind of sucks, but otherwise you get a cowboys and Indians (gun violence and native genocide for the kids!) narrative which is arguably worse.

Like you said, the ideas of bandits and cavalry and miners and railway folk, I mean, that all works just fine. But these days, including Indians as a sub-theme as well is a can of worms that I don't see Lego being in a hurry to open.

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By in United States,

The Lone Ranger was a bit of a western revival, much like Pirates of the Caribbean was a bit of a pirates revival. The sets were actually good, but the movie did poorly. With licenses being a big draw now, I don’t foresee a western revival anytime soon. Plus, as mentioned, the pc nature of today’s society would find a lot of fault.

Having said all of this, the entire western theme was one of my all time favorite themes.

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By in Australia,

^ Oh, my desire for a real solid Western train set was satisfied by the Constitution Train Chase (add the locomotive to some of those green MOT passenger carriages, and viola!), no question.

Still needed a station, though.

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By in United States,

I still remember turning down my parents offer to buy me Fort Legorado's re-release in 2003 during our Legoland visit... because I wanted the exclusive pre-release Rahkshi available there instead.

Like I love Bionicle still... but seeing I can get Rahkshi cheaply on Bricklink compared to the price of either edition of Fort Legorado... it hurts. It really hurts.

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By in New Zealand,

@MCLegoboy: I think the Western theme could be made to work in other markets, but it will always be an issue for so many reasons. The Cowboys, Soldiers, Townspeople, Prospectors/Minors, etc., idea works in the American Southwest, Alaska, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, and parts of South America. But the main problem with the idea of the theme is that it's colonial in nature, no matter what way you look at it. American Southwest is colonial against Mexicans and Native Americans. Alaska is colonial against native Alaskans. Australia and New Zealand are colonial against Aborigines and Maori. And Mexico and South America are colonial to Native Americans. The American Southwest also has the undercurrent of post-Civil War America, which has its own troubling problems. So while I love the theme personally and consider my nearly complete collection of Westerners LEGO one of my prize collections, I don't see how it can really work as a future theme outside another movie tie-in like The Lone Ranger. It needs to be a marketing tool—something where any criticism can be redirected to the film studio—rather than an organic production. Otherwise, LEGO will justifiably be criticised for being offensive to one group or another.

A possible solution is to do a historic Gold Rush-themed series. Gold rushes happened all over the world and brought people of every ethnic group and nationality together in a very unique kind of way. Many of the popular aspects of the Westerners theme could be integrated, but through the lens of a gold rush. While indigenous populations were certainly impacted by such rushes, I feel the impact was much less and it could be more safely ignored for the sake of the theme. You could still have sheriffs, soldiers, criminals, prospectors, townsfolk, and the like, just through a very unique viewpoint. I'd buy everything if they were designed well and affordable.

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By in Turkey,

Todays politically correct world truly gone overboard. It's much harder to make movies, cast artists or in this case produce toys, for gods sake. Social media doesn't help either. I mean look at this set, it's such a beautiful scene. I'm lucky to have couple of smaller sets of this theme.

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By in Singapore,

@monkyby87 Toys should be the least of their worries. If they want to be politically correct, they can start by giving the Native Americans their lands back.

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By in United Kingdom,

Waaant! Bring back Lego Western!

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By in Hong Kong,

What a beautiful set!!! But yes, no way we can ever go back to those "innocent" days of cowboys and Indians, and a good thing too. If you look back at the Western sets, it's interesting to note that although the cowboy/cavalry sets were mainly "shoot 'em up" sort of sets, (as far as I know) Lego wisely never released any sets with mixture of cavalry and Indians in the same set.

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By in Russian Federation,

It's so messed up that we won't see indian set in the near future, unless Disney shoots Pocahontas movie or something.

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By in Germany,

Here is an Idea;
Lego loves licenses right?
So why not make some Back to the Future (1-2-3) sets?
BttF 3 had the most authentic western village. Saloon, Courthouse, Farm, Emmett's black smith barn, ofcourse the background buildings and even a western train.
And we allready got a Back to the Future set (a couple if you count the Dimentions packs)

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By in United Kingdom,

Oh hey, I had this set! ...*mostly*, at least. This was the other one that I got in the mixed lot of Lego from some friends that I mentioned on the Royal Knights' Castle when it was Random Set of the Day a while back. The lot was missing one of the teepees, one baseplate, the horses, the canoe and all but one-and-a-half minifigures, but was otherwise fairly complete ^^

I still have the set around, too! I honestly didn't know much about American Natives and such, though, so I never really played with it a whole lot even as a kid; it's sort of been just THERE this whole time xD;

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By in Germany,

To answer (only on my part) regarding how important this theme (not Lego, but in general) is in the rest of the world, I stumbled over a birthday party moving from a to b in the streets, all the 10 kids (about 4-6) were dressed up really nicely as cowboys and native Americans. And that happened in a very left liberal / green area of Berlin. I was a but surprised cause I thought that this topic is completely forbidden and not PC anymore, but the kids seemed to enjoy dressing up to this theme.

So - I guess there is some relevance still.

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By in Moldova,

I really don't see why LEGO doesn't make Western sets anymore. I mean come on, it's been 20 years already since we had LEGO Western... it's about time you reboot it.

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By in Germany,

Its funny how fast this lego set causes a discussion about political correctness... I never ever met a person who had negative or violent thoughts when thinking about Cowboys and Indians nor a kid thinking about colonial things when playing with lego western sets. Perhaps come down to earth....

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By in United States,

@Grosskalb88
I think everyone is down to earth here, but other people wouldn’t be if they made these sets. Some idiots were offended by the Chinese New Year figures being yellow.

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By in United States,

Anybody remember KB Toys in the USA? Piles upon piles of these moved through for $35 each, on deep closeout discount. I bought sooooooooo many.

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By in United States,

I hated this theme as a kid (and loved the Western sets). This is just a series of BURPs and cloth pieces with not a whole lot of actual building.

Lego also still releases Native American minifigures in the Collectable Minifigures line, so the topic is not forbidden. I think they are just skeptical over it selling.

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By in United States,

The tricky thing about real life western history is its different than the films made it out to be. Its really a two decade long flash of history, from a mix of 49's, religious refugees, military men, trappers, etc. settling the west after the Mexican-American War. All mixed with the sticky issues of Colonialism. Then twenty years later the railroad was built and suddenly things started shifting dramatically as the west was industrialized. More railroads were built, and while there was a brief flash of train robbers and railroad wars it all quickly ended as soon as federal agents from back east arrived in town.

I can't pin exactly when the wild west certainly ended. I can pin for sure when it ended where I live in Utah though, when we covered the territory in railroads, ended widespread practice of polygamy, gained state hood and finally finished the temple in Salt Lake changing the identity of the town from a dusty western city to a modern Edison Electric age town of streetcars and granite buildings.

I don't think Lego is exactly dying to build a Utah statehood history set, but my point is real history often offers themes and ideas that just don't make an exciting Lego theme.

So to avoid becoming either a history lesson, or a potentially PC blunder (if the Maori can complain about the misuse of Tohunga in Bionicle... it could certainly happen again if Lego poaches a native culture poorly). There is a simple solution...

Sergio Leone. The Spaghetti Western. Don't make the west as it was, but as we wish it was. The hero standing in a dusty street. It's high noon, and a man in black faces him. This is Lego though, so instead of using his pistol to shoot the villain he takes a shot at a precarious tub on a rooftop with a bathing man sitting in side. The tub and its occupant slide off and splash in soapy glory over the villain in pure slapstick fashion. No history lesson, but fun Lego times.

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By in United States,

I was lucky enough to get the older version 6766 (1997) from a thrift store several months ago. At a glance the sets look the same, but I just noticed the older version has 10 more pieces...not sure what the differences are. It was missing a handful of pieces which I've mostly replaced, but still need a couple of large light gray rock pieces. It seems like a very awesome set and I'm looking forward to building it once I get the last couple pieces I need.

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By in Germany,

Still have this. It is pretty easy to bricklink, too, except for the tipis (spelling?). It is a really nice set, with a lot of play value and a nice baseplate that can be re-purposed for many other ideas.

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By in United States,

I misread it as “Raped river village” xD

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By in United States,

Could you do a wild west theme? Sure, if handled appropriately, but like others have said it would be a bit of a mine field.
As for the TLR sets, LEGO did the sets with mixed results. Sure people liked them for the army builder set, and the train. But many sets had to be really discounted to get them to move. Now you could try to blame that on the movie, but I think it was more that the idea was 20-30 years too late. In the secondary market they have risen a bit, but I think the wild west type sets have a hard time selling now (and even in the 90's) because the 'Wild west' genre had its time in the US (the 40-60's; early 70's), even before political correctness came into its own regarding 'the West'. It was fading away with those generations. Given the fact that it seems like the younger generations know very little about (and appear to not want to know) history at all (let alone the 'expansionist era' of North America in the 1800's) that we are seeing a lot of other issues with ignorance of other cultures and people.

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By in Russian Federation,

@Lego.lord
It's not "political correctness gone mad", it's called respecting other people and understanding nuance.

Grow a conscience, for crissakes.

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By in Hungary,

Yup, I expected the comments to be a mess.

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By in United Kingdom,

@grossKalb88 why did you have to be that guy?
The one that joins every conversation at somepoint just to make out like they are smarter and more mature than everyone in the comments.... it's toxic and nobody needs it... it makes people feel less inclined to share. Plus it's so boring

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By in United States,

Hey everyone, thanks for all the different perspectives and helping me understand the interest levels more globally, I've even learned a few things, too. For the most part it's been a really well handled discussion and you're all great.

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By in United States,

I see a lot of comments saying that a Wild West theme could work, just without Native Americans.

Well that doesn't make any sense. How would that solve the perception of glorifying colonization and genocide? If anything, leaving out Native Americans would be even worse.

What about the opposite? Bring back the Wild West WITHOUT/before Europeans and colonization. Just different Native American nations, no cowboys and settlers.

@whaleyland: love the idea of a gold rush theme. That would definitely avoid a lot of social issues.

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By in United States,

I actually wrote a college paper about this set because honestly it gave me the European version of how the native Americans were

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