Random set of the day: Remote Controlled Points Right 12 V

Posted by ,
Remote Controlled Points Right 12 V

Remote Controlled Points Right 12 V

©1980 LEGO Group

Today's random set is 7858 Remote Controlled Points Right 12 V, released in 1980. It's one of 28 Trains sets produced that year. It contains 12 pieces.

It's owned by 680 Brickset members. If you want to add it to your collection you might find it for sale at BrickLink or eBay.


18 comments on this article

Gravatar
By in United States,

Like the majority of the old 9/12V electrical sets shown; I am sure that I found one at a flea market today (or ordered it off of Bricklink) that was in good condition; it would still work. My LEGO is in a fairly damp basement, and I have no problems with my Power Functions (I always take the batteries out if the battery box isn't powering something). But I bet even in 5-10 years, a Powered Up! set won't due to its dependence on third-party technology (Bluetooth) and smartphones, which seem to be superseded with a new model every six months.

Gravatar
By in United States,

Oh man, it seems like only yesterday we got Remote Controlled Points Left 12 V as random set of the day! It's good to see Remote Controlled Points Right 12V finally get its day, being the clearly superior model, but I can't help but feel a bit of nostalgia for ol' Points Left. Good times.

Gravatar
By in United States,

^it was WAY back on 4/22/18, before the unexpected Clikits invasion.

Gravatar
By in Australia,

I do miss the points that allow trains to continue to run side-by-side, though. The newer ones leave about 8 studs (IIRC, don't quote me on the exact figure) between the two subsequent lines.

Gravatar
By in United States,

I’m a director of software engineering. Keep software away from my Lego.

Gravatar
By in New Zealand,

Was there a Left?

Gravatar
By in United States,

^ Was there ever!

Gravatar
By in Turkey,

Just yesterday I was mending my broken signal post that came with 7860. These old pieces really get brittle by time.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Thank goodness- Huwbot is back on the right track again.

Gravatar
By in Hungary,

CliveyB: Pun intended?

Gravatar
By in Czech Republic,

40 years later...

Gravatar
By in Italy,

@tspike: what software? That's 1980, "remote" means "buttons with a long wire" :D
Although... you can probably hook it to the original DACTA Technic Control Center and control it with a DOS PC, Apple II, or Acorn BBC Micro.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

Proper Lego, proper Lego trains:-)

Gravatar
By in United States,

Make sure you add some tile to cover up the studs on that controller for the perfect SNOT aesthetic.

Gravatar
By in Germany,

It is very disappointing and sad that something like this is not possible for Lego today!

Gravatar
By in Canada,

Cleaned and re-built my 12V collection during the summer break, after years in the attic. Still working great, daughter was excited with the lights/switches/crossing remotes. It's a truly marvellous system, even today.

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

definitely prefer the design of the grey 12V to the blue- although the control modules of the blue were more compact, the switches were less positive and power supply between them was surface contacts, not the pins of the grey.

Plus Blue only ever got points, the grey range had a 2 aspect signal with automatic train protection (!), a decoupler (reportedly a bit unreliable) and a full barrier crossing- I've still got this in mainly working order, except for the unit that caused the lights to flash and made a siren noise (could probably take it apart and poke at components) and a red light (damn things were filament bulbs!)

Gravatar
By in United Kingdom,

These were great but the problem was that it did not also switch the power to the track. With the 9V trains when you changed them, the power was also switched to the other track - so you could easily stop a train in a siding or passing loop. It was harder to run multiple trains on one track with 12V, you needed several signals 7860.

Return to home page »