Random set of the day: 9V Train Track Starter Collection

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9V Train Track Starter Collection

9V Train Track Starter Collection

©2006 LEGO Group

Today's random set is 2159 9V Train Track Starter Collection, released in 2006. It's one of 2 Trains sets produced that year. It contains 24 pieces, and its retail price was US$29.99.

It's owned by 251 Brickset members. If you want to add it to your collection you might find it for sale at BrickLink or eBay.


 

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17 comments on this article

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By in Venezuela,

Justifiably nostalgic LEGO Trains enthusiasts in 5, 4, 3, 2...

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By in United States,

I pity anyone who set up their 9v display with this set, only to have 9v go extinct a couple years later.

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By in Australia,

It is kinda frustrating that, every few years, the Trains brand gets a do-over, and everyone has to start from scratch. 9V was great, sure, and how many different types of control/power have they had since then?

Yes, it's Lego (I remember someone once saying, "It's Lego. You could make Pizza To Go into a 12V train carriage if you wanted." I never did see the end result of that, I should've asked), which is probably a saving grace.

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By in United States,

I got a bunch of these (or a similar track pack on discount at the Lego store to go with 4559! They were sooooooo cheap in 2010 lol:)

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By in Germany,

16 curves, 2 straight tracks. Yeah, exactly what everyone needs after buying a train set with 16 curves and no straight tracks.

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By in Canada,

I was/am 12V tracks guy, something about the design of [most] 9V train put my off Lego trains completely, only with the PF trains I found them nice again. The whole system was a bit off, at least my PF trains can run on my 12V tracks, 9V couldn't.

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By in United Kingdom,

I wonder why the magnets were included?

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By in Netherlands,

Yeah I'm confused by the magnets as well (insert "magnets how do they work" meme). I can't think of any use they would have here aside from replacements, but then that's weird that they included them with a track set, and include the magnet part only, without the holder.

As for concerns about train system do-overs, at least 9v had a pretty good run at (over?) 15 years.

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By in United Kingdom,

I can only assume kids like curving twisting tracks a lot more than straight runs.

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By in Hungary,

Suddenly i thought that is a new set for this year, but nay :O meh :)

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By in United Kingdom,

Still love my 9v track. Every now and then an amazing train is released which easily runs on 9v. The last one was the Horizon Express....

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By in United Kingdom,

I think the reason for the odd content is it's selling off left-over parts or bags from the 4534 'LEGO Express' train set, which is itself a bundle of 'My-Own-Train' packs from LEGO's experiments with modular on-line set delivery dating back to 2001.
https://brickset.com/sets/tag-My-Own-Train

It's not a track accessory pack; it's the pack of track when you bought the set.

(Note that there are some bundles like 4534 that aren't tagged 'My-Own-Train' and probably should be).

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By in United States,

Funny considering all the 9V trains that were in the most recent Catawiki auction.

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By in Portugal,

The best train tracks.

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By in United States,

@elangab:
Technically you can run 9v on all track types, if you don't mind giving up direct control. I'm also not sure how you'd adjust the speed, but you can always wire a battery box directly to the 9v train motor. I know people who do this for PF trains at public displays, though the rechargeable boxes do have a dial that allows you to adjust the speed. The upside is it costs less, and there's no chance that someone in the crowd will pull out a PF remote and start playing with your trains.

For this pack, the two straights would probably be compensation for having to store another stack of curves, and the magnets are a bonus.

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By in United States,

@Zordboy I must disagree. LEGO has been very careful not to make everyone start from scratch.

When 9v was retired in favor of the first generation battery powered Remote Control trains, the battery base was compatible with 9v train motors. It had the same connector. And of course it could run on the 9v tracks.

When the Remote Control trains were retired in favour of Power Functions, all the 9v and Remote Control motors were compatible with the new PF battery boxes, as the connector was 9v compatible. And again, you could continue to run on 9v tracks.

In fact still today with Powered UP it still uses all the same tracks. You can run your new PUP trains on 9v tracks if you want.

It is only with Powered UP that LEGO has made the first truly incompatible connectors, meaning you need all new powered components. Considering 9v was released in 1991, I think 26 years of electronic and track compatibility is pretty good. Technology has to move on eventually.

I think a lot was lost with the move to 9v in the first place (The 12v system had remote control signals, turnouts, lights, train crossings), but up until now LEGO has always offered pretty good backwards and forwards compatibility.

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By in Australia,

Still the best looking track, even if you are using them unpowered. With a bit of custom work, I have seen setups using powered track to recharge the battery on a PF run train.

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