Review: 42082 Rough Terrain Crane - Part 2

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View image at flickr

Two days ago I started my review of 42082 Rough Terrain Crane.

At 4057 parts, 42082 Rough Terrain Crane has the most parts of any Technic set. You will probably need to set aside a few evenings to compete this Goliath model.

Read on as I complete my review and offer my overall opinion of this huge set.

New and rare parts

I have taken a more detailed analysis of the parts inventory for this set. While there are no new parts, there are two parts in a new colour and several rare parts.

Parts in new colours:

Rare parts that appear in four or less sets:

The full inventory can be seen at Rebrickable.

Book 2

Book 2 builds the crane's superstructure. There are 12 bags for five build steps. In this section you will also add the Power Functions L Motor and battery box.

View image at flickr

Build Step 9

Build step 9 assembles the frame of the crane's superstructure and contains the main gearbox that controls whether the Power Functions drives the chassis options or the boom options.

View image at flickr

Note that there is a grey ball with cross axle on the gear lever but this will later be hidden under the panelling.

Build Step 10

The Power Functions components are added to the superstructure in build step 10. The battery box acts as the crane's counterweight.

View image at flickr

I used a figure-of-eight knot to anchor the string to the winch.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

Build Step 11

The extendable, red boom and hook is assembled in build step 11.

Here is a view of these components prior to attachment to the superstructure.

View image at flickr

And this is what the model looks like when the boom is connected. A figure-of-eight was used again to the anchor the string to the end of the boom.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

There is a clever rope guide laying the string onto the winch.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

Build Step 12

The motor and gearbox covers are assembled in build step 12.

View image at flickr

Build Step 13

The model is completed in build step 13. Here is the cab.

View image at flickr

The model comes with four prefabricated grey panels that joins together to build a roofless cabin.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

Completed Model

I have applied the stickers to the completed model.

The crane cab has a non-functional lever to the right of the steering wheel and also a fire extinguisher is located in a bracket behind the cab.

The door has a clever way of pivoting open.

View image at flickr

I believe that OK Lifting Services acknowledges Olav Kroigaard as the LEGO designer for this set.

Olav Kroigaard started [working for LEGO] in September 1987 as a LEGO Technic designer. After 12 years [he] changed to LEGO System and designed LEGO Sports, CREATOR, Batman, Spider-Man, and other LEGO licensed lines.View image at flickr

When the crane is slewed to the side the exposed V8 engine can be seen.

Throughout the model are small safety stickers that warns people not to get their hands or bodies caught in the exposed gearing. I am not sure whether they represent real-world safety stickers or they are there to warn young people not to get their small fingers caught.

Either way, the stickers provided the same function.

OK branding has been added to the engine and the white oil filter has a sticker.

The rubber tyre at the rear operates the four-wheel steering.View image at flickr

View image at flickr

Power Functions

Whether this is a draw back or not, all the Power Functions are driven by one L Motor housed in the crane superstructure. As a result, there needs to be some clever gearing to enable you to operate each particular powered feature. There are four gearboxes in this model: two in the crane superstructure and two in the chassis.

The switch on the battery box has been modified so that polarity can only be switched one way.

The principle gearbox is on the top-left of the crane superstructure. This determines whether power is directed to the chassis (left) or the boom (right). Earlier you saw that the gear lever had a grey ball with cross axle. Here you can see that the lever is controlled using a red selector.

The boom gearbox has three options: boom up/down, boom extended/retracted, and winch hoist/lower.

View image at flickr

I cannot figure out why there are two rubber bands just next to the battery box. They do not perform any function.

Edit: It would seem that the rubber bands provide friction to the hoist and boom-extension functions when these options are disengaged.

Down on the chassis are two gearboxes. The gearbox on the left-hand side operates the slew ring. There is also a small locker for a toolbox and set of tools.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

On the right-hand side of the chassis is the gearbox for the outriggers. A locker contains a box of rigging chains. It is possible to extend/retract the outriggers while the crane is slewing.View image at flickr

View image at flickr

Overall opinion

There are a few really great features. One of the best designed features is the rope guide just above the winch.

The two grey wheels slide back and forth on the 5M axles and this effectively, and neatly, lays the rope onto the winch.

View image at flickr

The outriggers are really strong and could lift the crane clear of the ground. However, configured the way they are, they do not lift the wheels up because they are too short.

The outriggers need the four 6x6 pads under their feet otherwise the outriggers won't reach the ground.

The outriggers are very slow to deploy. The price paid for their strength in being capable of lifting the model clear of the ground is that the gearing down of this feature makes it incredibly slow.

In the real world, deploying outriggers is very slow; however, I'm expecting this slow feature will be frustrating to some people.

You can see the detailed wheel hub here.View image at flickr

View image at flickr

The drive train for the Power Functions to the chassis goes through two sets of small 12-toothed bevelled gears. Here are the bevelled gears above the slew ring.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

And here is the bevelled gears immediately below the slew ring (this sub-assembly is upside down in the photo).

I just hope these small bevelled gears are up to the task they are put to.

View image at flickr

This set includes lots of red Technic parts in the crane superstructure. Some of these parts are rare and will appeal to Technic and Mindstorms enthusiasts.

While not specified in the instructions, the chains used to lift the grey pre-fabricated panels can also be utilised to secure the hook.

The boom does not lower down to a horizontal position. This is the lowest it goes.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

I wanted to view this crane alongside 42009 Mobile Crane Mk II.

Admittedly, 42009 Mobile Crane Mk II's boom is not fully extended - it has been displayed at quite a few LEGO shows and the mid boom section has jammed - this image shows the sheer size of 42082 Rough Terrain Crane against the yellow crane from 2013. It is refreshing to have a modern Technic crane that is not yellow.View image at flickr

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

Finally, here's a bird's-eye-view of the crane. I needed to rig a special backdrop as the model would not fit on my regular photographic backdrop.

I have enjoyed building this model. Having the parts separated into numbered bags made the building process straight forward and ensured that the eventual building outcome was error free.

This is a solid, sturdy crane and the Power Functions operate easily and smoothly. However, they operate a bit slow due significant gearing down.

View image at flickr

40 Years of Technic Cranes

I saw a post made a few hours ago by a friend of mine that made the connection between 42082 Rough Terrain Crane and the original Technical crane set of 1978 - 855 Mobile Crane. The post implied that 42082 Rough Terrain Crane celebrates 40 years of Technic cranes.

Here is my 855 Mobile Crane that I received on my twelfth birthday. For sentimental reasons, it is truly one of my favourite Technic sets of-all-time.

You can see how far Technic has developed in forty years.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr


Thanks to Toyworld Henderson for supplying 42082 Rough Terrain Crane at 20% discount for the purposes of this review.

Thanks to Paul 'Bricktrain' Critcher for specialist crane advice and helping with the crane terminology used throughout this review.

 

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26 comments on this article

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By in United Kingdom,

That is a serious bit of kit!
Great review, Mr Flag - I shall look forward to building this.

Wonder what those elastic bands are for though...

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By in France,

Very impressive model. This second part confirms what I said at first : even as a non Technic fan, I just can applause this master piece, which IMO represents all the science of Lego Technic design and possibilities. Good review and pictures again thank you. This must be a real enjoyment to play with this as a child... Even if building process needs adult's hands. GG Lego!

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By in United Kingdom,

Good review thank you. I’m not a Technic builder so this may be a silly question, but presumably one could replace the outrigger arms with slightly longer Technic bars, I suppose with some reinforcement, to lift the crane off the ground?

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By in New Zealand,

Good onya Toyworld Henderson.

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By in United Kingdom,

Excellent review of an excellent set.

Looking forward to getting this (like a bit of Technic every now and again just to mix things up).

As they serve no purpose on this build, I wonder if the elastic bands are meant for the pile driver model and are put on this build to be kept out of the way/in shape. It seems very odd to have them and then not be used in some way.

EDIT: had a look at the instructions for the 'B' model and the elastic bands are incorporated into the build in much the same way.
From looking at the instructions, the only thing it reminded me of (in the way in which they are placed in the build) is of an old style friction brake for the 3rd axle in the gearbox assembly. Probably miles off but it's difficult (for me) to suss out exactly what it does from the instructions alone.

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By in United States,

I believe The Brothers Brick said in their review of the set that the elastic bands were used in some way to provide friction to one of the axles in some way.

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By in United States,

I definitely recommend watching Sariel’s video review as he and I both feel the same about this set. It’s nice that this set marks 40 years of technic cranes, but it just wasn’t needed. The set 42009 Mobile Crane is even more functional and debatedly, even more complex. This set 42082 doesn’t stand out, there’s nothing special or unique about it. It’s not even that big. At least it’s an improvement from last year’s flagship set

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By in Russian Federation,

Thanks for the review, but set is not impressive at all (but still better than last year 42070). If you have 42055 and couple of prior top technic sets, you`ll be able to build this one without problems. But most probably in yellow:)

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By in Portugal,

In my opinion this is the best LEGO technic set in this year.

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By in United States,

Great review.

I've already got a 42009 Mobile Crane and a 42042 Crawler Crane set up in my office. So I think I'll stick with those as this one doesn't really seem to add a whole lot. As I had suspected, even though 42082 has 56% more pieces than 42009, it really isn't THAT much bigger. The pic comparing them side by side is a little misleading as 42009 base is long while the 42082 base can't be seen but is stubbier. The pieces must all be small pieces. And I would prefer 42082 to have a 3 section extending boom similar to 42009. Not to mention the incredible 4 axle steering system of 42009.

I'll be passing on 42082 but I'd buy a re-released 855 Mobile Crane in a heart beat.

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By in Jordan,

Not a Technic fan, but there's no denying that this is a most impressive model!

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By in United Kingdom,

This set is definitely on my wish list and I will buy it once it’s decently discounted at amazon or Argos, I recently picked up 42055 from amazon for £103 and 42070 for £120 from Argos both of which are absolute bargains!!!
I enjoy watching Sariels reviews but I always feel he is just too harsh and has unrealistic expectations of what a set should be able to do, it is after all just plastic held together by pins that are meant to come apart again, none of the gears are lubricated or sealed from the elements. They are impressions of the real thing to show you how things work and be fun to build rather than serious scale models. I really couldn’t take his views of 42070 seriously at all as Lego models are clearly not intended for outdoor play and it’s certainly not supposed to be a rock crawler RC truck!!!
This set looks brilliant to me and will provide many, many hours of building enjoyment as the nights draw in for the winter. Great review as always from brickset!!!

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By in United States,

Excellently detailed review. Do you know how much the crane can lift?

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By in United States,

@Your Future President, according to sariel’s review it lifts just over 1kg.

@mrdoofa, I totally agree with you, he does seem really harsh on LEGO sets. You should totally comment him on that on one of his videos.

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By in Viet Nam,

@Huw: Milan doesn't design this set. He said on his FB page that for the 2H 2018 he only worked on a prototype of the Forklift 42079. Besides, Milan only puts OK on aircrafts. Land-based models that he designed like 42069, 42071, 42078 get MR instead.

I think this OK stands for Olav Kroigaard instead. His latest models include 42053 in 2016,
42062 in 2017, and the recent TIE Fighter.

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By in Philippines,

See, I think the Bucket-Wheel Excavator is the more brilliant mechanical achievement, but this set is impressive all on its own, and I think it supersedes the old multi-axle crane (though somehow if they're able to make a 9-axle mobile crane with a 4-foot long boom...).

Now, for a quick question...I've been meaning to create a City-scale or microscale mobile crane with more than one extension, using the pre-fab crane part (https://brickset.com/sets/containing-part-4263583) on LDD, but can only get to one extension. It's hard to figure out how Robert Heim was able to nail that one-stud-wide last extension on his mobile crane (https://www.flickr.com/photos/robiwan_kenobi/5118109292/), which is the only thing I need to fill the big crane part. I've tried simpler solutions using window panels but they leave awful gaps. How?

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By in United States,

I'm surprised that they didn't use the new Power Functions.

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By in United States,

I'd like to better understand the purpose of those white rubber bands. Maybe for looks, representing some belts on a real crane? I was ready to purchase this set until I saw them. They don't last, losing their elasticity and stretching out over time. After the 7469: Mission To Mars set, which was dependent on those rubber bands for the suspension, I won't buy any set where those rubber bands are an essential element.

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By in Germany,

On those rubber bands:
When you power the input wheels of the gear box the output when not engaged to either side might be driven by friction between the red cogwheel and the axles.
This will drive winch respectively boom extension in unforseeable direction if no rubber band is used. It is a means of adding friction so that the gear box output will not be driven by input wheel if they are not engaged.
Has anyone removed them yet to see what is going on?

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By in Greece,

Thanks everyone for your supportive comments.
@ nguyengiangoc: Thanks for indicating the true designer of this set. I have amended the text to give credit where it is due.

@ chefkaspa: I have added that comment in the main text. Thanks.

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By in Canada,

I am going to get it . As a technic fan I have to have the biggest set. Nice to see the pictures with the old cranes to compare.
Looks like there is actually the old style studded bricks being used in the boom.
I wish they would used the old studded bricks way more , even if it is only in the main frame of most sets.

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By in Morocco,

Amazing model, impressive 40 years evolution, it's already in my wishlist, but still I hate stickers. Why does lego still using stickers at that sets level ?
All my sets older 7-8 years are loosing their stickers... So Since 5 years ago, I avoid as much as possible to paste stickers :(

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By in Austria,

This is impressive... I seldom have the urge to get a Lego set nowadays, most newer sets have lost the 'magic' but this one, managed to bring it all back. I can imagine myself playing with it and looking at all the parts moving. The process of constructing this sturdy design is definitely going to be enjoyable. I think I'm going to get it!

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