The LEGO Zoo

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The LEGO Zoo by Jody Padulano has just been published by No Starch Press. It was originally published in Italian by another publisher last year, I believe.

The 200-page softback contains instructions to build 50 colourful zoo animals almost entirely from basic pieces, and that is a large part of its appeal.


There are dozens of books published nowadays that provide building instructions for models but often they require new or hard-to-find parts. That's not necessarily a problem for you and I because we we have thousands of pieces and know how to get any that we don't have, but for the average family or KFOL who's not likely to have such a broad collection of bricks, it can be offputting and disappointing.

This book, then, is ideal for the younger or casual fan, because the models use common parts: bricks, plates, slopes, eye tiles and so on that they are much likely to have or can get hold of easily in the easily obtainable Classic sets.

It's divided into 5 chapters, with models getting progressively larger and more complex as you go through the book. However, even those in chapter 5 will not cause anyone too much difficulty as there's no complex SNOT or other advanced techniques employed.

The instructions are clear and concise and are preceded with a description and photo of the model, and parts list, which includes LEGO element numbers.

To be honest this is not a book that most AFOLs will get excited about but they are not the intended audience. It is, however, absolutely perfect for young builders and would therefore make an ideal Christmas gift for one.

It's available at Amazon.co.uk for £16.99 and Amazon.com for $13.36 and from No Starch Press directly. If you buy a paper copy there you'll get a free eBook version.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

View image at flickr


Thanks to No Starch Press for providing this book for review. All opinions expressed are my own.

 

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9 comments on this article

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By in United Kingdom,

What a great book - I was going to buy it but unfortunately have been put off by the price which I think is on the high end.

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By in United Kingdom,

I hope it is coming to Norway!

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By in United States,

Some of the models look great! such as the mouse. The chicken (which is what I suppose it is) just looks like a big block with a head and legs. I would not have displayed that model for one of the pluses of the book. I agree with Huw that the assortment of bricks needed to build some of the models is highly exclusive and might be hard to come by. But looks cool for kids! And since it IS for kids, who's to stop the from making a multi-colored giraffe with short legs?

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By in United States,

The Royal Turkey looks beautiful.

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By in United Kingdom,

As you say these books are great but annoyingly difficult to make exactly..... I notice the wings on the Bee are only in 15 sets but are very cheap and available on Bricklink. I tried to make something this week that appears in a Lego game only to find they have never made that part in black........

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By in United Kingdom,

I'm not sure if ^^^ read my review properly. I said "the models use common parts: bricks, plates, slopes, eye tiles and so on that they are much likely to have or can get hold of easily in the easily obtainable Classic sets." which is in contrast to many other books with instructions.

I did not, of course, check every part and it could be that a few are not that common but the majority look to be.

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By in Hong Kong,

Love brick-built animals!!!

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By in United Kingdom,

Interestingly, I think I learned something new in the comments here. I didn't know that a Peacock was called a Royal Turkey in the US (nb. I am assuming @Lordmoral represents the entire US in his comment haha)

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By in United States,

Um... never heard of a Royal Turkey, but can I get one in time for Thanksgiving Dinner? Btw I love the whale w/rabies on bottom left of page 5 :) On a serious note I can see my daughter (age 9) digging this book. I can also see myself getting rather perturbed at her requesting to disassemble my creations for the required pieces... what a Christmas gift conundrum.

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