Review: 42110 Land Rover Defender

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Technic fans have never had it so good. Not only is the most technologically advanced and largest set being released in a couple of weeks (42100 Liebherr R 9800), so is the excellent looking 42110 Land Rover Defender, the subject of this review.

It's said to have the most complex gearbox in a Technic set yet so it should be a challenging build. Let's find out...


Parts and instructions

The set contains 2573 pieces, making it the 9th largest Technic set to date. Thankfully they are packaged in numbered bags, 1 to 4, which simplifies construction considerably.

Instructions are provided in a single 494-page manual which contains 860 steps. They are, or will be, also available via the LEGO Life app.

View image at flickr

While we wait for LEGO to publish the inventory so we can easily see what's new, here are the inventory pages from the back of the instructions.

Note the 7x11 rectangular beam, in black, which was first seen when SPIKE:Prime was announced.

There is an extensive selection of olive green Technic parts, including beams of length 1, 5, 7, 11, 13 and 15 as well as both sizes of 'L' beam and 5x11 panels.

The olive green mudguard/fender pieces and the wheels are the only brand new part designs in the set.

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Sticker sheets are par for the course in Technic sets like this, but thankfully it's not too daunting.

View image at flickr


Construction and gearbox

To replicate the gear-changing functionality of the real vehicle, the model contains two gearboxes. The first is built around the rear axle assembly and implements a 4 speed sequential gearbox using the same shifting mechanism introduced in the Bugatti Chiron last year.

It's a complicated build and you will want to make sure that you make no mistakes.

View image at flickr

The second part, however, is even more complex. The front of the chassis contains the reverse/neutral/drive and high/low gear shifting as well as the steering and the engine.

View image at flickr

Take your time with this because mistakes are likely to require the whole thing to be dismantled. Did I build mine correctly? Find out later...

View image at flickr

Now is the time to investigate how the gearboxes work because shortly they will be buried under seats and bodywork and inaccessible.

The controls are surfaced by the driving seat, as you'd expect. The lever on the left selects reverse, neutral and drive, the one on the right selects high- or low- gear ratios and the knob at the back twists to shift between the four gears in the rear gearbox.

View image at flickr

Here are closeups of the front gearbox:

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And the rear...

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The 6-cylinder engine features a crankshaft which pushes the pistons up and down as its rotated. The speed at which they do so is dictated by the gearbox.

View image at flickr

Pictures can't really do justice to its complexity so I recommend taking a look at RacingBrick's excellent video that demonstrates how it all works, and determines whether it works correctly (the jury is still out, I believe...)

Did I build mine correctly? Actually, I'm not sure. I think so, but I experience a lot of gear 'cracking' in higher gears, which I believe is due to friction. It's discussed in the video above, and Sariel mentions friction preventing the engine from running in his video, so I might be in good company.

The dashboard and seats are added and already half the gearboxes complexities are buried away. The back seat pads look way too high here but they are not visible once the bodywork has been added.

View image at flickr

Once parts from bags #2 are exhausted the chassis and interior is complete, so the rest of the build should be plain sailing.

Indeed, things do become much simpler now as the bodywork begins to take shape.

View image at flickr

After bags #3 are empty there's just the front, bonnet and roof rack to complete.

View image at flickr

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The completed model

The white roof was getting bit lost against the white background so I switched to a grey one for pictures of the completed model. I had hoped to take it outside today for some action shots but it's pouring with rain for the first time in weeks in the UK, so they will have to wait...

View image at flickr

The spare wheel attached to the back has a hidden function which you'll discover below.

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The vehicle is fitted with roof rack and equipment for a remote adventure but these can easily be removed if you'd rather model the Chelsea Tractor variant.

View image at flickr

The olive green looks excellent and suits the vehicle perfectly. It's not quite the right shade of green compared to that on the real vehicle but it's close enough.

LEGO System parts have been put to good use on the side of the vehicle and on the bonnet to form slopes and curves not possible with Technic pieces alone.

View image at flickr


Functions

Apart from the aforementioned gearbox, which is now buried inside the vehicle and unlikely to be played with again, functionality is scant, as you'd expect for a vehicle of this nature. However, all the features you'd expect to find have been implemented: steering, suspension and opening doors.

The 4-wheel suspension works particularly well and does not suffer from sagging. Take a look at Sariel's video for a demo.

The doors open to reveal an impressive level of detail inside the cab, and on the inside of the door. The steering wheel is functional, and steering control is replicated on the roof via the gear visible on the pictures above.

View image at flickr

View image at flickr

The back door is opened by turning the spare wheel which operates a spring-loaded catch.

View image at flickr

The bonnet can be lifted to view the engine and operate the winch, via the gear on the left and a red lever bottom right, just out of view, that operates a simple ratchet mechanism to prevent it spooling out unintentionally.

View image at flickr

The stairs on the left of the vehicle can be lowered to give access to the roof.

View image at flickr


Verdict

I think it looks absolutely beautiful. The boxy shape of the real vehicle lends itself well to being modelled with Technic, and in many ways it looks better than the real thing. The colour suits the style of vehicle perfectly, even if it's not exactly like the prototype. I don't usually like a lot of System parts in my Technic sets but I do appreciate their judicious use here to help with the styling.

The first stage of construction is arduous and care must be taken to ensure the gearboxes are built correctly but once they are out the way things become more enjoyable as the bodywork comes together. There's very little repetition, other than left- and right-handed sub assemblies, but that's unavoidable.

The gearbox is, frankly, a bit pointless. It's incredibly complicated and mine fails to run smoothly in all circumstances. Of course I could have made a mistake, or perhaps built it more carefully to minimise friction, but if I, with 20+ years of Technic building experience, have trouble, what hope does a kid have. Perhaps the boundaries of what's possible with Technic have been pushed just a bit too far.

Like the gearboxes in the Chiron and Porsche, it's nice to know it's there and that you built it, I suppose, and your friends will be impressed when you tell them what's inside, but it has no practical value at all.

The other functions -- winch, steering, suspension and doors -- all work well, though, and are much easier to play with.

Overall, though, there is a lot to like here: a challenging build, complex mechanisms and an attractive end product: everything you could want in a Technic set.

42110 Land Rover Defender is launched on October 1st and can be ordered now from LEGO.com for £159.99 / $199.99 which, compared to similarly sized Technic models, seems quite reasonable.

View image at flickr

Here's the Chelsea Tractor variant, with roof rack removed.

View image at flickr


Thanks to LEGO for providing the set for this review. All opinions expressed are my own.

53 comments on this article

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By in United Kingdom,

I would assume that this doesn't have a B model? But it does look great.

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By in Netherlands,

"The lever on the right selects reverse, neutral and drive, the one on the right selects a high- or low- gear ratio and the knob at the back twists to shift between the four gears in the rear gearbox."

Lots of functionality in one right lever!

Very detailed review, but I think this one is not for me. Too much style over substance, the 8880 supercar is still the holy grail for me. You can still see what's going on there.

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By in United Kingdom,

It's an ambidextrous gearbox!

No B model, but then licensed sets like this never do.

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By in United States,

Here's a question for Technic gearheads: What "is" the "point" of a gearbox in a Technic car anyway, if not to be there and cycle through the gears? What else could hypothetically be done with it? On heavy equipment, the gearbox drives the various functions, but on cars it simply transmits power to the wheels at different speeds. Would you prefer there not to be a gearbox at all in the Land Rover, Porsche, etc, because there's no point? But then the white Porsche loses points because it has no gearbox. I don't understand. Also, this review says functionality is scant apart from the gearbox. But it's got HOG steering that connects to the steering wheel, a winch with ratchet, full suspension, a tailgate with a mechanical lock, plus some cosmetic details. What else do you want? What else could there be? I've seen a MOC that had power windows, but that's a bit much to ask for in a retail set ....

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By in United Kingdom,

I don’t normally buy Technic sets, but this kind of fits the Landrover. I have bought the Creator vehicles and think this’ll look good with them, so this might be my first Technic purchase!
Thanks for the review.

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By in United Kingdom,

I said functionality is scant because unlike cranes or diggers there's only so much can be added to a vehicle like this. Everything that should be implemented has been, I admit, so perhaps that word is unjustified.

I don't believe I docked points from the white Porsche because there was no gearbox in my review.

And, would this set have been better without a gearbox and £50 cheaper? Some would think so. I'm not sure.

The gold standard for functionality is still https://brickset.com/sets/42054-1/CLAAS-XERION-5000-TRAC-VC , IMO.

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By in Australia,

>No B model, but then licensed sets like this never do.

The Mack Anthem and Volvo sets have B models I guess.

I don't expect one here since most Rovers look very similar.

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By in United Kingdom,

They are not sets like this.

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By in Germany,

The steering is not right ;-)

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By in United Kingdom,

What's wrong with it?

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By in Ireland,

"...a crankshaft which pushes the cylinders up and down as its rotated."
Yikes! I would hope it's the pistons that get pushed up, not the cylinders...

At the end of building the Porsche I felt like the escaped fish at the end of Finding Nemo:
Now what?
I'm afraid I'd have the same here after covering everything in panels...
My favourite Technic car is still 8448, the perfect mix of visible engineering and styling, and the perfect mix of studless and studded Technic.

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By in Germany,

For a british company I would have expected to be installed on the proper side of the car...

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By in Canada,

I think the model looks pretty good but I think I would have almost preferred the gearbox be omitted and the price dropped a bit. It seems from all the reviews that it doesn't even work properly and if you can't play with it or show it off what is the point really? I guess for some the fun of building it.

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By in Germany,

This is a perfect example for everything that is wrong with Technic nowadays and why the theme doesn't sell anymore (and why I will also not buy anymore Technic sets unless TLG releases sets that deserve the name).

- the set looks good - Technic sets are not about looks. If they also look good it is an added bonus.

- the functions are hidden in the final model - Technic sets are about showing the functions clearly.

- the build is extremely complex yet what for? - Technic sets are about teaching how things work and making it easy to understand.
After having built this set the average builder still needs someone knowledgable (preferably someone with a degree in advanced engineering) to explain how the thing works. Mission failed. Especially when even expert builders like Sariel can't get the thing to work properly, there is something very wrong with the design.

I don't get who is supposed to buy this. Land Rover fanboys? Engineering students? Certainly not LEGO Technic fans. For those, 8880 and the like will always be a thousand times more desirable. Or when it comes to newer sets, something like 8043, the Volvo Wheel Loader or the Arocs are what can truly be called proper Technic sets.

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By in United States,

It's a tough thing for that gearbox.

If you remove the gearbox, then you'll get complaints about it being just a regular car with no special or unique functions as most Technic sets should focus on.

If you put the gearbox in, then you'll get complaints about it doing nothing, as all other gear boxes we have seen in other big sets like this.

Again, the battle between play and display continues, but whether you like it or not, I do applaud the designer for doing such a wonderful job engineering the whole thing.

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By in United Kingdom,

@chefkaspa, right... yes, that did gall me a bit, too. It would be very difficult to convert to right hand drive, requiring quite a lot of rebuilding, otherwise I would have.

@Duq, well spotted. I wondered who'd be first :-)

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By in Netherlands,

A Bugatti with suspension it can't handle. A Porsche with a faulty gearbox. A Bucketwheel Excavator that can't pick up "dirt" and struggles to work at all. A Land Rover with a poorly working gearbox...

So far a lot of flagship Technic models have had issues with the things they're supposed to be good at. This Land Rover doesn't seem to be any different. The sets are getting bigger but instead of being more impressive they just get frustrating instead. The technic part of Technic seems to get lost.

I've no idea what the point of these sets is anymore.

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By in Germany,

As a technic builder (MODder) the set is less appealing:
We already got three shades of green (bright, dark & earth) for technic parts and now 'olive'. This does make sense to me. Any colour from existing palette is welcome.
I would buy for the technic aspects and maybe setup the chassis (similar to 8860 or 8856).

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By in Germany,

Even taking into account that this is not a "real" Technic set and belongs into the same category as the other models that gather dust on a presentation shelf or the corner of an office desk, the set does not even look cool.

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By in Germany,

I gotta admit, I like it. I'm probably not going to buy it, since I don't have space, but it's looking great and seems to be a fair priced set. I also like the colors ; )

One thing though: And this has been asked but I believe not properly answered: What's the deal about the gearbox, why is it in there and hidden? Wouldn't that only make sense if you had a motor? The only visible cue as to what gear you chose is how fast the cylinders would go, or am I wrong?

It's not crying or critic, I'm just curious why they put it in. I'm sure there is a reason for it.

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By in United Kingdom,

No, you are exactly right, hence me stating that I think it's a bit pointless.

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By in United States,

Question, and I may be repeating @yamaki, but what is the function of a gearbox in a Technic set? Wouldn't it make more sense in a PU/Control+ enabled set?

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By in Canada,

Of course 8880 is a classic - and a first in so many categories. But, like Duq, my favourite supercar is still 8448. Most component of the car is detachable ((1)frame attached to rear drivetrain ans suspension - (2) front steering and suspension - (3) transmission - (4) engine and (5) a few possibilities for the frame.) - how about that for learning purposes! I will buy this and try to put the gears back in order - also need to change the high/low gears. For my 8448, I built a stand that lift the back wheels slightly and I have a motor powering the engine - as I shift the gear in sequence, the wheels turn faster and faster - as it should be. I will try to do the same with this build.

What I truly believe is missing in the Technic range are sets like 8094, 8485 and to some degree 8074. Older builders don't need something on wheels to fake-drive around. Those (I believe) are people who wants to discover new mechanisms and see/understand how they work - and potentially to improve them.

They could do a walkers set. How to make robots move using different techniques from the most basic to incredibly complicated (motorized set). It does not need to have a computer in it. Showing the mechanical concepts of getting something to move on leg is sufficient - builders can add the controller they want (mindstorm, arduino, raspberry pi) to control it. I bought quite a few Fisher Technik sets and I would like to see most of the "plant" and "industrial robots" sets reproduced in Lego form (would require very useful new parts).

I would love to see one "mechanisms" or "things" (as opposed to vehicle) set per year. Have a look at: http://507movements.com/index12.html . While most are covered, many are still impossible in Lego form. I believe (I sure hope) there is a market there.

A similar problem will surface again with 42100. As each function is attached to a different motor, the complexity of the model will be close to zero. It will be fun to play around with (for a time) but it won't be a technical marvel that most Technic fans will drool over. And there is that thorny issue of the app which, for sure, will eventually be dropped.

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By in United Kingdom,

Is it just me, or does it look like it's got a battery box attached to the roof?

Nice looking model, but it should have some power functions for the RRP.

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By in Germany,

@Supersonic
My BWE works very well! You only have to build it correctly...
:-)
Udo

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By in United States,

Before this review I was leaning no, but now I'm leaning yes. Technic gearboxes have always been anti-useful, but I still like them, and this one takes the cake by essentially filling up the entire chassis! I love the video demo using an L motor. The irony here, of course, is that electric cars don't even have trannies. This should be the final Lego transmission in my opinion.

There is an unofficial B model on the designer's own YouTube channel. I can't remember how I came across it, but he builds it and shows each step in the video. There are no traditional instructions that I'm aware of.

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By in United States,

A BWE is not designed to pick up dirt from the bottom of a pit, it is designed to tear into the face of the mine and remove the material and all the features on my BWE work including the spills conveyor. The only issue is the gear slap, but considering the medium that is fine with me. My Bugatti sits fine and I have not noticed any difference in it's stance.

As to the question why include these features?

For me it is not necessarily the end product but the build. I am amazed at how Lego can produce sets with these features and the designers who design them. I love seeing how it all comes together, just having suspension, engine steering and opening doors, gets pretty boring, but add the complex gearbox and it's a done deal for me.

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By in Netherlands,

Shame indeed the functions are hidden. I would understand the use of a gearbox, albeit hidden, if the cylinders would work properly, but the way they operate should be used for valves. It just looks pretty dumb to have such a complex mechanism to get these things to pop up every once in a while.

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By in United States,

I think i'd prefer they release the Liebherr later, as that would be a lot of money to spend!

The white background looks great also.

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By in United States,

On second thought, Lego has yet to release an automatic transmission. THAT will be the final transmission!

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By in United States,

I'm surprised the wheels haven't gotten more attention. The more realistic pivot point in these wheels, as well as the new wheels for the Creator Ford Mustang are the best things that have been coming out of LEGO for builders. I'm excited to build and see what others can achieve with these more realistic hubs.

Great review! I'll probably just get the new wheels and make it out of my own parts, I'm definitely not in love with the olive green...

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By in United States,

Oh, and a clutch. They've never done a clutch. I built my own clutch in 1980. Not sure why Lego skips out on clutches.

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By in United Kingdom,

I'll definitely be getting this at some point, and yes, once built it will sit on a shelf looking good. I am glad it has a gearbox though, as it's good to see what can be done, although I very much doubt I'll understand it!

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By in Australia,

If I buy this it will be for the superficial reasons that AustinPowers talks about. I do like Land Rovers and it would be a display piece not a technic marvel. So people are right. This is an expensive set that doesn't quite hit the mark. I still want one. And I want to make it post apocalyptic

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By in United States,

That amazing gearbox sounds like a worthwhile building challenge. It may not be very accessible once the whole vehicle is built, but just knowing it was there would be quite a thrill for me! This review has definitely put the Defender on my wish list.Thank you, Huw.

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By in Germany,

@sklamb and @legowerba: the problem is that nowadays when you build a Technic set with their overly complex and fault-prone mechanisms you tend to just follow the instructions, build the mechanism, but unless you are an engineering expert you don't really get what you do until it's finished. And even then, more often than not the finished product doesn't deliver (or isn't even properly constructed, like the Porsche gearbox).

Take the infamous 42070, that among its many faults can't even clear the smallest obstacle, let alone lift anything slightly realistic with that flimsy crane.

Or the new 42100, which can't even climb the slightest hill or clear small obstacles despite its rugged appearance.

Or the Bugatti, that does indeed appear to be too heavy for its suspension. Perhaps some production runs had better (i.e. stiffer) springs/shocks than others.

Or the aforementioned BWE that indeed slips more often than not and appears to suffer from a general lack of power. Perhaps separate motors would have helped.

It is hard to find a Technic set of recent vintage, let alone among those that call themselves "flagship sets", that would be worthy of the name Technic, let alone be desirable products in and of themselves at all.

And honestly, if they want to make a Land Rover properly, why not make a Creator Expert one. At least that would be about looks, and no one would need to spend all the effort designing an overly complex gearbox that in the end does nothing, isn't seen, and barely works as it should.

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By in Germany,

Chelsea Tractor with a winch? I don't think so... :oP

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By in United Kingdom,

^ It might be needed for hauling other people's cars out of parking spaces so you can park in their place :)

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By in United States,

@AustinPowers: I question whether the older Technic sets were really as perfectly functional and easily understandable in comparison to current sets as you seem to think. Looks like a clear case of rose-colored glasses to me.

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By in United States,

@iwybd You are correct. Functions have been hit or miss since the beginning. The original helicopter, for example, pitch system did actually work, but if you let go of the stick it will gravity reset. Not to mention the fact that it doesn't actually fly. So, I see Technic functions as sort of interesting Rube Goldberg contraptions, and I love it!

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By in Germany,

@iwybs: no, it is not rose-colored glasses. I still have all my Technic sets of old built up and on display and even after all these decades they still work better than many of the new ones.

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By in United Kingdom,

It's a nice looking model, but those two gearboxes are a ridiculous amount of complexity.

I hate how modern technic is all about a ludicrously complicated pile of gears. They all look and feel like you're trying to build a replica of one of Babbage's Difference Engines until the very last page where some wheels go on and you realise "oh, it was a car all along".

A couple of forward speeds, neutral and reverse is far and away the most you would need even if you powered a LEGO model. In this case if they want to implement the separate Hi/Lo selection then you only really need forward and reverse on the other selector.

No-one's going to learn anything useful about gearboxes from such complicated designs. They should keep it simpler so you can at least learn how one functions and maybe replicate it in your own builds.

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By in Jordan,

This might be my first proper Technic set! I think it looks great, has good functionality, and a decent price. I also very much like that the gearbox isn't totally covered, so that I'll be able to appreciate at least some of it once the model is assembled.

I find it interesting how Technic gearheads seemed to be quite divided by this set.

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By in Ireland,

@JoeFish Very good point. Technic started with a slogan 'engineering like in the real world' or something along those lines. In the early days that was the case. Kinda. The old bulldozer wasn't very realistic but it worked, and it taught you how gearing worked.
With a lot of modern Technic sets they either have no gears at all or so many in a tight space that during the build you have absolutely no idea how things work and how they link together.

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By in United Kingdom,

^ That is certainly the case here.

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By in United States,

On the other hand, the older Technic sets from the 1970s-1990s were designed such that the gears, bushings, etc required very delicate hand-alignment that was next to impossible to get right in the step wherein the gears and axles were first placed. None of the older Technic sets larger than what would cost $30 today have worked right for me - their drive trains all crack and bind, and the linkages are all stiff, unreliable, and cranky because of those alignment problems in assembly. That makes it hard to learn anything from them.

Today's Technic sets are designed with ease of assembly and alignment in mind, and the linkages are generally pretty easy to follow if you want to understand how they work. The only reason the gearboxes are troublesome (besides having incorrect gear ratios sometimes, but that's another question) is that the gears are closely packed, so it's harder to see them than it was in the older sets, wherein there were comparatively few gears in comparatively large studded frames. That may raise the bar a little bit for the amount of effort you need to put in to learn the principles of gear ratios from your Lego Technic car, but it doesn't mean the set is no longer educationally useful.

I still don't understand where the complaints are coming from that the Land Rover and other modern sets with similar functionality aren't "real Technic"; are insufficiently realistic or overly complex; etc. If seeing every detail of every mechanism without cosmetic encumbrances is a requirement for "real Technic," then the great Technic sets of the 1990s don't count. They sure used a large amount of parts for cosmetic details. If "realistic functions" are a requirement (eg being able to handle the same terrain as the source), then the great Airtech Claw Rig from 1992 doesn't count, because it sure doesn't have any more all-terrain capability than the 42070 6x6 tow truck from 2017.

As for the desire for simpler gearboxes - the 2017 go-kart had a nice little two-speed gearbox, forward and reverse, for $40. Is that really all the gearbox you Technic gearheads want? I've been seeing that a lot in forum discussions about the 42110, and it's a real surprise given the excitement-disappointment cycles over the 42056 and 42083 gearboxes, the nostalgia reviews of 8880 that were published in 2016, and the fact that every large Technic MOC car I see makes sure to have at least a four-speed gearbox.

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By in Germany,

@iwybs: I dare to say proper Technic probably is not for you if you had so many problems with your old sets. I can't follow your description at all. Even as a kid I didn't encounter the problems you described. Properly built none of these points hold true.

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By in United States,

In old Technic, I refer to 853 Car Chassis (1977), 8860 Car Chassis (1980), 8277 Giant Model Set (1997), and 8480 Space Shuttle (1996). In new Technic, I refer to 42024 Container Truck (2014), 42043 Mercedes-Benz Arocs (2015), 42053 Volvo EW160E (2016), 42054 CLAAS XERION (2016), 42066 Air Race Jet (2016), and others. Because axles and gears are often introduced to the instructions of the older sets as floating assemblies without spacer elements, it's very difficult to properly align the gear trains on the older sets, and that makes it very difficult (for me) to get the gear trains and sometimes the mechanical linkages to run without cracking and binding. That leads to more frustration than education. Of the new sets, only 42066 hasn't run well straight out of the box based off my reading of the instructions.

All my creative building is digital right now and I can't figure out how to build and simulate Technic mechanisms digitally, so maybe "proper Technic" isn't for me. I don't dispute that; nothing I build will ever land in the Eurobricks Technic Hall of Fame. I just don't believe that, in a general sense, modern Technic is any less functional or less educational than 80s-90s Technic; and therefore I don't believe that it makes any sense to say that modern sets "aren't real Technic." Calling 8880 Super Car (1995) "real Technic" while saying that 42110 Land Rover (2019) isn't "real Technic" reminds me of the endless complaints over whether or not the prequel trilogy, then the sequel trilogy, are "real Star Wars." That kind of gate-keeping isn't useful because one AFOL (or TFOL, or KFOL)'s "real/good" sets are another one's "rubbish."

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By in Australia,

Wow such lively debate!

Consider: search for 8440 and 8466; awesome supercars for their time, still commanding premium prices today, even when you want to buy then 3rd, 4th, 5th hand off ebay. You pay as much as todays 4000+ technic sets. A 'back to basics' Flagship sets is in order, with B, C, D and E models in the same manual!

No more fancy shmancy! looks like the pendulum is swinging the other way, the pendulum been swinging in this direction from 2011-2010 Unimog I feel, technic fans are revolting now!

(personally, I do love these current complicated sets of today also, as I do love my old flagship 1999-2001 sets as mentioned above, even if the mechanisms are obstructed from view, but you can see where the wind is blowing now)

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By in Germany,

To be more precise, probably, (remember I am not a native speaker of English so sometimes I find it hard to get my point across properly): I find building current Technic sets more frustrating than enjoyable. In the older sets I saw what stuff was going to be for in the final product while building. Nowadays, even though the instructions are dumbed down to the max, I build page after page of gears and axles and subassemblies while all the time wondering what on Earth it will be for in the end. To me that is not enjoyable building, hence why I don't intend to buy more Technic sets. From what I gather from talks with friends who own toy stores I am not the only one who thinks so. Might be one of the reasons why Technic is doing so poorly nowadays.

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By in United States,

Not to belabor an internet argument too much, but Technic is consistently listed as one of the top five themes in the financial reports. Shrug. I agree to disagree, and will shut up now.

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By in Canada,

Props for using “Chelsea Tractor” ??. Ready to conquer a weekend of shopping haha. Great review.

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By in Sweden,

Would want this, except that it's the 90 model. Really would've loved it if there was an 110 as the alternative build... :P Is it actually possible to buy two sets and figure it out? Or would that take longer than impeaching Trump?

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