Press release for 21318 Tree House

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Tree House

Tree House

©2019 LEGO Group

Here's the press release for 21318 Tree House, which tells us a lot about the materials used but not much about the set itself. Hopefully our review will provide any information not covered here.

21318 Tree House, 3036 pieces
US $199.99, CA $269.99, DE/FR €199.99, UK £179.99, DK 1799.0DKK
Available to VIPs tomorrow, everyone else from 1st August 2019

Since the LEGO Group launched its first bricks made of plant-based polyethylene last year, the sustainable bricks have increasingly been included in new LEGO sets. The Treehouse contains the highest number of sustainable bricks ever in a LEGO set and is another important step to fulfill the LEGO Group’s sustainability ambitions.


A gathering point for family and friends. A secret hideout. A fortress. A sleepover.

LEGO fans can now immerse themselves in the intricately detailed LEGO IDEAS Treehouse. A challenging build, the exclusive set, made up of more than 3000 elements, including 180+ botanical elements made from plant-based polyethylene plastic using sustainably sourced sugarcane, is the largest LEGO IDEAS sets to date.

The Treehouse is packed with play-inspiring features and comes with a landscape base and removable treetop to reveal three detailed cabins. A special feature of the set is that all 185 plants and leaves are made from sustainable materials sourced from sugarcane. This includes the treetop canopy, which has interchangeable sets of green summer leaf elements and yellow and brown fall leaf elements.

Tim Brooks, Vice President, Environmental Responsibility, the LEGO Group, said:

“When I first saw the model, I was blown away. Not only because it looks amazing, but also because it connects strongly to the very reason we are investing so much time and effort in identifying new and sustainable materials, which is to preserve natural resources and fulfill our planet promise. It really is an important step in our ambitious target of making all LEGO elements from sustainable materials.”

During 2018, the LEGO Group began making botanical elements, including trees, leaves and bushes, from plant-based polyethylene using sustainably sourced sugarcane. Children and parents will not notice any difference in the quality, durability or appearance of the new elements, because plant-based polyethylene has the same properties as conventional polyethylene. These elements represent the first milestone in the LEGO Group’s ambitious commitment to making products using sustainable materials by 2030.

The Treehouse is an example of how the LEGO Group uses co-creation to foster innovation, as the original idea was submitted through the LEGO IDEAS platform, where LEGO fans can upload their creative builds. Users then have a chance to review and support the model and, given sufficient support, the build can end up as a certified LEGO set with the help of LEGO master designers. In this case, the model was submitted by fan designer Kevin Feeser from Nancy, France. Kevin’s motivation for creating a treehouse stems in particular from his passion for the great outdoors combined with pretty sophisticated LEGO building skills.

The LEGO IDEAS Treehouse model is available directly from LEGO Retail Stores and shop.LEGO.com exclusively for LEGO VIP members beginning July 24, 2019, with general public availability beginning August 1, 2019.

FACTS: The LEGO IDEAS Treehouse & LEGO Group sustainable materials mission

LEGO IDEAS Treehouse

  • The LEGO Ideas Treehouse celebrates Kevin Feeser’s design for its endless creativity that its unique to the LEGO System in Play and its embodiment of the LEGO Group’s sustainable materials challenge.
  • All 185 leaves and plants in the treehouse are made from plant-based plastic – the largest number of plant-based elements in a LEGO set so far.
  • A list of the elements made from plant-based plastic is included on the top of the packaging.

The LEGO Group’s sustainable materials mission

  • The LEGO Group is on a mission to make all LEGO bricks sustainably by 2030.
  • For the LEGO Group, a sustainable material must have a reduced environmental footprint, be produced responsibly using renewable resources, and meet our high standards for safety, quality and durability.
  • High standards for sustainability, safety, quality and durability mean that there are no simple replacement materials on the market, and the LEGO Group is working with suppliers, research institutions and other industries to develop new materials to be used in the LEGO bricks of the future.
  • The LEGO Group has an ambition to find sustainable packaging alternatives by 2025 that are renewable, efficient and recyclable.

LEGO elements made from plants

  • All the trees, leaves and bushes and many of other elements in our LEGO sets, more than 80 types, are now made from green polyethylene, which is made from ethanol produced from sustainably sourced sugarcane.
  • The sugarcane is grown in Brazil, is sourced responsibly and does not compromise food security.
  • Polyethylene is just one of many materials used in LEGO elements, and the LEGO Group expects the materials of the future will be made from both plant-based and recycled sources.
  • Customers can expect the same high quality of our plant-based elements. The elements do not biodegrade…because we want to make safe, functional and durable products that can be played with for generations.

You can find additional images on the set database entry.

27 comments on this article

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By in Norway,

Finally!! A bit expensive tho..

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By in United States,

What interests me is that IDEAS went for a set that has more than 3k elements, could this be a new standard?

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By in Hungary,

I'm all for TLG continuing on going green, but this press statement kinda overshadows the fact that it's a fan-submitted model a little...

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By in United States,

Welp, I'll need to get two so I can have one ready for display in the spring/summer and then another in the fall. Maybe I'll get three so I can leave off the foliage for a winter set.

No, not really.

I'm really excited to get this one. It will be a great display piece.

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By in Finland,

The pile of autumn leaves looks like a glitch in the photo. :P

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By in United Kingdom,

WOW, LEGO is really upping their game on this theme.

2019 has been with out a doubt the best year for Ideas sets. The Flintstones was spectacular, the Steamboat Willey was iconic and now this new best of a treehouse, hopefully LEGO keep up the great sets for this hugely popular theme. I thought 2018 was a great year for the theme but 2019 is so much better. I hope to get this set eventually as I am so much more into the theme, at the start of 2019 I only had the 2014 Research Institute now I have 5, Pop Up book, Steamboat Willey, Flintstones, Tron Legacy and the Research Institute.

Love the fact you can change the leaves from Spring/Summer to Autumn, the three rooms are detailed to the brim, plus three minifigures a total of 3036 parts for just £179.99 (£0.05 per part)

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By in Turkey,

The official name is "Treehouse", not "Tree House" :)

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By in United Kingdom,

We know but the concatenated word is not a proper word in the dictionary.

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By in United States,

@Thunbear, the way I see it, the actual idea of doing a treehouse came from the Ideas platform as opposed to the model itself. It was a good idea for them to be able to really showcase their plant initiative. So I think they kind of glanced over the Ideas aspect since the model wasn’t as much of an inspiration as just the idea itself.

At least that’s my thought ;)

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By in United States,

While the changing leaves thing has an appeal, I’d much rather those parts been used to make the the tree more robust (more branches and leaves). The submission looked like a tree and this one looks a bit sparse.

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By in Canada,

Canadian exchange rate is killing it here. Will still get it but its almost $100 more than those south of us.

Looks like a fun model to have around the house.

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By in United States,

This is nice. And $200 for 3,000 pieces is a pretty good deal (though a lot of those parts seem rather small, so I guess it all evens out).
Haven't decided on this yet. I can see myself changing out the leaves for the seasons, though. If I did get it, I may even want to make a winter scene for the treehouse with snow piled on the branches and roofs.

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By in Sweden,

I love the color scheme (with the autumn/fall set of leaves it stands out in particular), I also appreciate Lego's sustainability policy, despite being a bit overdue in my opinion. Definitely one of the more interesting sets released this year as it looks a bit MOC-ish, which adds to its charm :)

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By in Canada,

@tallblocktoo I think your conversion is way off. XE.com currently has 199.99 US = 263.05 CAD; American are saving $7 compared to us.

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By in Canada,

It contains the most plant based elements but does it contain the most pieces that represent flowers, plants, leaves, foliage... ?

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By in Italy,

I have just purchased the 70840 set for € 240, it is still a high price but a little better than the full price of € 300. However I like this tree house, maybe I'll buy it for Christmas, if I have some money ...

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By in United States,

I enjoy it but I won't buy. 200 feels a little expensive. For that price i'd rather buy the Saturn 5.

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By in Singapore,

@Huw: With all due respect, I'm not happy with the deliberate naming inconsistency with official LEGO set names in the Brickset database. For one, it makes it harder to search for sets for which the user may not know the set number unless they look it up elsewhere beforehand (Brickset's search engine doesn't do stemming or fuzzy matching at all AFAICT). Minor differences such as the inclusion of a space in this case I can overlook, but then there are sets that have completely different names on Brickset compared to everywhere else (such as #10717-1 Bricks Bricks Bricks that has never officially been known as Extra Large Brick Box to my knowledge — my charitable interpretation is that the latter was merely a placeholder that never got updated to reflect the official name).

The reason I can overlook this particular set's name is because LEGO themselves don't have any semblance of consistency among sets with "Tree House" and "Treehouse" in the name either (#41335-1 Mia's Tree House, one of my favorite 2018 sets, immediately comes to mind). But if you're going to give such a reason as "Treehouse isn't a proper word", why not correct CapnRex101's review in which they consistently use "Treehouse" for the name of the set while using the correct phrasal noun "tree house" to refer to the eponymous structure? And you'd want to correct the names of #31010-1 and #31053-1 as well — those are relatively old sets that you might have missed or might have pre-dated whatever this naming policy is.

But I digress. There is no real grammatical reason why LEGO should ask us to write their name in all caps, yet we do it anyway out of respect for them. So it just seems like unnecessary effort to go out of your way to spell the name of a set differently, not just here but also in the set database, just because you're not used to writing it a certain way.

I will share my thoughts on the set itself, of course — just I'll do it under CapnRex101's review where it belongs.

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By in United States,

This will be the first set I buy not licensed under Star Wars, LOTR, or Harry Potter.

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By in United States,

Here’s a fun game. While reading this press release, Drink every time there’s a reference to “plant based” or “sustainability”.

*Hint* (Don’t do this you’ll die.)

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By in United States,

@Huw: I am with LegoSonicBoy on this one. Linguistic pedantry is no reason to ignore the official LEGO set names. And I've seen numerous examples of that myself — including bizarre cases where instead of older sets using the official American set names or even the official British set names, they use the American names with British spelling (Examples include #6245-1 and #6265-1)!

By insisting on a prescriptivist insistence on linguistic accuracy — you undermine the site's accuracy of reporting and documentation for both current and past set names.

And anyhow, it's not even like favo(u)ring British English spellings is reason to object to "treehouse" as a compound word — while the Oxford English Dictionary doesn't list the compound spelling, the Collins English Dictionary, Longman English Dictionary both do:
https://www.collinsdictionary.com/us/dictionary/english/treehouse
https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/treehouse

But anyway, delightful set design! I saw the designer video and it has lots of great details about easter eggs and how the set designer made sure to include creative input from the project creator: https://youtu.be/A-RDSa_cj4Q

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By in United States,

I'm with @Thunbear. Plant-based plastics are great, but from reading this you'd think they're announcing the sustainable program, not an Ideas set.

I also agree with @Aanchir. Even if "treehouse" isn't in your dictionary of choice, most dictionaries are descriptive, nor prescriptive. They don't claim that words that aren't listed aren't real words.

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By in United States,

In addition to Aanchir's post... if you insist on every set name only including words in the dictionary, there are quite a few set names with entirely fictional words that would need changing as well (even going back to classic sets like the "Battrax" from the Blacktron theme). Seems like a weird thing to insist on if you ask me.

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By in Canada,

I like that it's not a licensed product, it's actually an original idea. Which I do believe was the premise of Ideas in the first place.

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By in United States,

@Aneurysm_2: Literally the first two Ideas sets (back when it was still called "Cuusoo" and exclusive to Japan) were licensed recreations of real-world technologies. The idea that Lego Ideas was ever meant to exclude licensed properties, or that a well-done model of a fictional subject is any less "original" than a model of something based on the real world, has always been a misconception.

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By in Serbia,

In response to the linguistic pedants, I suggest switching all Brickset set names to their Danish versions. Those should be original and undisputed, right? ;)

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By in United States,

The water in the bathroom is trans black in the pictures, while in all the reviews, it is trans blue

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